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A Horse Tale

by ceebs Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 03:30:34 AM EST

We've had a week of fun at the Leveson Inquiry, we're now onto the second module of part one which covers the interactions between the police and the press.  The first section seemed to consist of heroes and villains, the innocent and their tormentors in the press and their victims.  The second part has appeared to consist of villains on both sides of the argument.  Dodgy reporters and corrupt cops, with the occasional stellar performance by the honest copper.

The big news this week has been all about a horse, although it should have been all about corruption between journalists and the Metropolitan Police.  But this story's duck house is a horse called Raisa.  And Raisa was a retired police horse who was placed with Rebekah Brooks.  In less intense periods the fact that a newspaper editor whose husband owns a stable was looking after a retired police horse would go almost unremarked, but this isn't a normal time.


At the beginning of the week it seemed to be a momentary detail that would flutter away in the wind of details emerging from the Inquiry.  Stories linking the senior echelons of News International to the apparent interference in the investigation of the axe-murder of a private investigator.  But the horse story had legs.  Firstly the press people at Number 10 were most evasive when pressed on whether David Cameron had ridden the horse.  We knew that the prime minister had a history of riding out with Ms Brooks, Paul McMullen had talked about having hidden in a hedge to report on Cameron and Brooks riding together in the tape that Hugh Grant had recorded:

How Raisa the ex-police horse could come to symbolise the phone hacking scandal - Telegraph

Mr McMullan had told Grant: "Cameron went horse riding regularly with Rebekah. I know, because as well as door-stepping celebrities, I've also door-stepped my ex-boss by hiding in the bushes, waiting for her to come past with Cameron on a horse . . . before the election to show that - you know - Murdoch was backing Cameron."

After Three days we had this statement From Cameron at a press conference, which the media is taking as an admittance:

Note how the Prime Minister specifically doesn't deny going out riding with Rebekah, rather his entire denial is built around riding with her husband, it's all very carefully worded, and makes me think that if the press keeps pushing there's rather more to this story still to come out.

However all of these stories are very distracting and managed to distract the press from police and press appearing utterly corrupt, or utterly inept.  (And sometimes both.)  You have to think that the PR firms retained by the Met have earned their money and then some by managing to keep the media focussed on a knackered old horse rather than evidence that they weren't doing their jobs.  In the middle of the week, the police put out a statement that when the horse had been returned to them, it had not been in a very good condition.  You'd have to ask if this was fair, or rather was it a PR attack trying to make Ms Brooks look cruel to animals and hence make the Met look to be the good guys in the horse story.

Of course no story is complete without its own Downfall parody:

Strange coincidences and gangsters.

Could this story get any weirder, well someone reminded me yesterday of a seemingly unconnected detail.  (Unfortunately I don't remember who so can't give them the appropriate praise.)  Back in the year 2000 there was an on-going feud between two figures in the London Underworld.  On the one hand we have "Mad" Frankie Fraser a famous 1960's gangster, and on the other side we have Dave Courtney another famous former villain.  Now Frankie claims that Dave has both embellished his criminal career to improve his standing with the book-buying and movie-going public, and also claims that he is a police informant.

VIEWPOINTS

My disrespect for 'Dodgy' Dave is not confined to the fact that he was exposed as a 'grass' in open court, but it also extends to the nature of the case that put him in court.

The case was particularly nasty. A young mother involved in a custody battle with the father of the child was 'fitted-up' with a Class 1 drug by the father, a crooked policeman, a 'dodgy' private detective, and it was alleged Courtney.

The innocent mother of good character was arrested on a false charge based on 'planted' evidence, She was the put in a prison cell and arraigned in court. The dreadful stress this must have caused to this woman, and her family would have to be experienced to fully understand its depth, and all because of her love for her child.

The police responsible for refusing to accept what appeared an open and shut case deserve credit for instigating an undercover operation and proving the innocence of the young mother.


Now those of you following this Murdoch story might find that detail somewhat familiar, the dodgy private investigator is one Johnathan Rees with close links to Andy Coulson who worked for the News of the World both at the time he was arrested for this action, and was re-employed after he came out of prison, something that Andy Coulson, ex-editor of the News of the World, and later David Cameron's press secretary signed off on.

Now I say strange coincidence, because Frankie writes this outrage because this has come to light as the trial is a detail in a TV program about "Celebrity villain" Courtney.  The TV program is made for a UK firm called Carlton TV and their Director of Corporate Affairs at the time was one David Cameron.

Is there more to this?  And is this what the editor of the Times was hinting at with his story about the cleaner in his evidence to the Leveson Inquiry?  Private Eye has said that the person detailed in that story, although unnamed in evidence, is Cameron, so was it another jigsaw piece that is a step towards linking Dave to Villains and Murderers if he doesn't back off? Only Dave knows.

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As he said in Downfall: "You couldn't make this shit up!!". That is doubtless why this whole sordid mess surrounding News of the World phone hacking makes such a compelling story. Of course it could be made up out of whole cloth, but this has lots of very real, very sordid details that will just keep emerging. It wasn't a Genie in that bottle. It was Murdoch and Cameron's nemesis, and for every celebrity or public person who got tormented by NOTW gossip it seems as if Nemesis is visiting ten times the anguish on those two. At this rate Cameron could be gone by the fall.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 12:27:03 AM EST
It wasn't a "knackered old horse". It was a bright, shiny white horse with fair hair and blue eyes that quite understandably divertattracted public attention.

It's a detail but, if it was only on loan to the Brookses (since it was later returned to the police), that hardly fits with the well-known tweet about saving an old horse from the glue factory, does it?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 03:42:38 AM EST
another small detail, this week the met's website page about retired horses has mysteriously changed. a couple of days ago it all said that these horses were retired and were not to be ridden, mysteriousy now its ok in some cases....

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 07:21:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This scandal is straight out of Blackadder...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:01:36 AM EST
well people have suggested it's been scripted by Chris Morris, the guy behind Brass Eyey and Four Lions.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:21:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Oh my, there's still much insanity on British TV waiting to be exported :-)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:40:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
if you've not watched it, wate till you get to the drugs episode (Where he managed to persuade an MP to ask questions about an imaginary drug in parliament) or the paedophilia special

the whole series is really about what ridiculous things you can get  Celebrities to say on TV.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:47:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I never watched the latter series of Morris because, for some reason, the sound quality was so poor I could barely make out anything that was said. too much whispering away from microphones.

Jam was completely unwatchable for that reason

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:01:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Jam is one I have to go back and watch. It happened when I was on a TV free year.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:05:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
here's a piece of the Courtney Documentary


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:26:54 AM EST
That sounded like a round of knowing laughs after Courtney proclaimed his faith in the British Justice System.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 12:24:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
HACKGATE DAY 418: ANDREW NEIL CLAIMS MURDOCH WILL MOVE BSKYB TO EDINBURGH | The Slog

In a remarkable opinion expressed this afternoon on the BBC's Sunday Politics, former Murdoch editor Andrew Neill (left) stated that he had "gleaned" while in Scotland last week that Rupert Murdoch will push very hard for a pro-Scottish independence vote "because he can then take BSkyB to Edinburgh and be clear of English justice".

Neill's comment will add fuel to rumours circulating for days that there was some form of Hackgate advantage for the Chippy anti-British Digger in backing Alex Salmond so overtly on Twitter, and then scuttling north to meet him a few days ago. For Slippery Salmond himself, of course, the kudos and employment likely to come from the shifting of at least part of News International to Scotland makes the deal extremely attractive.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:37:37 AM EST
http://dizzyshambles.wordpress.com/2012/02/25/leveson-inquiry-portraits/

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:43:13 AM EST
The thing I find rather baffling is the extent to which other newspapers, with the exception of the Guardian, are, if not ignoring Leveson, then treating it as an irritant that will one day go away and leave poor innocent NI in peace.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 08:58:24 AM EST
well the Independent and the telegraph have both been covering it reasonably, and the odd article in the mail

I think the majority of the tabloids are ignoring because they have all got their own skeletons in the closet. (If you go back and look at the ICO reports "what price privacy" and "What price Privacy now" they show massed blagging which papers have refused to justify under public interest defences, and all of that is just based around the investigation of one private investigator, so far in Leveson at least five PI's have been acknowledged as working with Tabloids)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:16:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It was more during the newspaper review on the Marr show this morning. They reviewed the Sun on Sunday without even touching the issue of Leveson, just as a normal paper

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:24:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The BBC's reporting on this has been notably quiet. It always amazes me that at the drop of a hat the Tabloids attack the BBC like a pack, but when a tabloid presents an open goal, the BBC seems to hold fire to a ludicrous extent, when you'd think that the thing to do is put the boot in for revenge

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:53:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Let he who is without sin cast the first stone...

There's plenty of anecdotal evidence that phone voicemail hacking was SOP for tabloid journalists in general...

Besides, they are all still scared of Rupert and his minions...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:20:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Still, as my Dad is one of the Murdoch 4,500 sacked in 1984, I'm just glad he's still alive to enjoy the unraveling of the Empire. glad that it's happening slowly enough to represent slow torture for Darth Murdoch

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:27:26 AM EST
on the Daniel Morgan Murder



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:28:55 AM EST
is the part that links to NOTW



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:35:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The entire Los Angeles Police Department was run as a criminal organization under color of law back in the 1920s. The Clint Eastwood movie Changeling, staring Angelina Jolie as the real life Christine Collins, whose son Walter went missing, is a stunning presentation of one incident in which the police could not be bothered to investigate a missing child, which turned into a serial child murder spectacle known as the Wineville Chicken Coop murders that involved the kidnapping and murder of dozens of boys in the greater Los Angeles area in the late 1920s. Instead of investigating the police just found another boy which they presented to Mrs. Collins at a press conference, and then proceeded to accuse her of mental derangement for not recognizing her own son and put her in the mental ward of County General Hospital where they had a cooperative psychiatrist as head of that unit.

From the review linked above:

Colm Feore plays chief James E. Davis, one of the more notorious leaders of the LAPD. Among his more infamous acts in office was forming a 50-man "gun squad" whose purpose, in Davis' words, was to "hold court on gunmen in the Los Angeles streets; I want them brought in dead, not alive, and will reprimand any officer who shows the least mercy to a criminal."

Crusading protestant minister Rev. Gustav Briegleb (John Malkovich) declares, however, that the real purpose of the gun squad is to cut down on the "competition." Prohibition is the law of the land, and well-connected gangsters and policemen are making a fortune from the illegal manufacture and sale of alcohol. Briegleb calls the LAPD the "most violent, corrupt and incompetent" police force west of the Rocky Mountains, and continually exposes their nefarious activities from his pulpit and on his local LA radio program.

The screen play was based on transcripts of hearings at LA City Hall that were about to be destroyed. I have heard LAPD officers 'joking' that theirs is the best gang in town. One cannot say this cannot happen as it has already. The problem is that we don't know how widespread and deep it has been as a function of time from then to now, though the Ramparts Scandal bodes ill.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:52:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, drugs are the new Prohibition an, if there's profits to be made, being the police gives you a special edge. So Rampart was inevitable.

But, as the book "brought to light" detailed, the shadow services have been using the profits available from the drugs trade to fund their little "projects" for decades.

I believe that most of the pressure to retain the illegality of drugs in the face of the massive evidence of the harm such a status causes comes from such sources. It's rather like Al Capone paying off the Senate to ensure prohibition stayed

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 03:05:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well from talking to people on the enforcement side, at one point the authorities in the Uk were taking in a random sample of packets from all drug busts, and before doing anything else doing a chemical test. this revealed that a significant percentage of all packets were positive for fingerprint powders, so had already been through the system at least once. And this wasn't a small percentage, it was either 40% or 60%

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 04:07:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
After I watched that film three years ago and read up on the real events I commented that the real events were even worse than in the film.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 04:17:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Kafka could just as easily have been writing about events in LA in the '20s.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 03:53:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I saw the news that the horse had been returned in poor condition on Jancis Robison's twitter feed.

It occurs to me that a lot of horsey people gr the establishment whi may have thrown their eyes up about the scandal of the retired police horse being given a home for a while will be much more annoyed by that little detail.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 09:54:19 AM EST
it's a truism that people can do all sorts of things to their fellow humans with almost no impact to their socail standing, but mistreat a pet and its entirely a different matter.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 10:08:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
 It may just be me but a police horse is one of the few real working horses left: mistreating one would be especially dishonourable. It's not just mistreating a pet.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 10:12:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
definitely, having finished a working life, the horse should be treated with respect, as if it's a pet or member of the family.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 10:36:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the newspaper Industry and the police

Police are linked to blacklist of construction workers | Technology | The Observer

The police or security services supplied information to a blacklist funded by the country's major construction firms that has kept thousands of people out of work over the past three decades.

The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has revealed that records that could only have come from the police or MI5 have been discovered in a vast database of files held on 3,200 victims who were deemed leftwing or troublesome.

The files were collected by the Consulting Association, a clandestine organisation funded by major names in the construction industry.

Its database was seized nearly three years ago, but the extraordinary nature of the information held has only now emerged, following an employment tribunal for one of the victims, Dave Smith, a 46-year-old engineer who had a 36-page file against his name and was victimised repeatedly for highlighting safety hazards on sites, including the presence of asbestos.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 10:53:42 AM EST
In terms of human suffering, I found the construction thing felt more evil.

(That's an emotional judgement, not a rational one.)

They've been systematically destroying people's lives, just for being a left-winger, or in some cases for reporting H&S violations around asbestos...

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 04:37:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
in some ways, because it's actual physical acts, but the phone hacking tabloid culture is more an enabling thing that produces a culture where things like the construction problems are possible.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 04:57:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Admittedly, I haven't been following this story as closely as some, and I see it from a non-euro point of view, as well as that of someone who rides.

But what am I missing here? Yes, Rupert's minions are dreadful people, still doing dreadful things and will be until the spavined old geezer is gotten rid of. And, yes, Young Mr. Cameron is a slippery sort.

The horse, however, seems blameless. If the Met has elderly and thus redundant police horses and sent them to whatever the modern glue factory is (probably dog food factory), there would be huge public outcry.  

So if someone takes in, even "rents," a horse for a time, agreeing to turn it out to pasture and excercise it, I should think that would be good. Ms. Brooks is someone who rides, and Young Mr. Cameron has been part of her social circle since before he became PM.

Thus, if they go riding together before he's PM, so?

This is probably why I read but don't comment a lot here, because I have enough trouble keeping up with the weirdness of the US. I pretty much get lost in some of the European ins and outs.

by Mnemosyne on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 02:21:58 PM EST
My impression is that though such a program would be good, that is not the case. The horse is instead an example of special treatment and the very close relationship between the Met, Brroks and Cameron.

Horses are so much more visible and solid then information exchanges, dropped investigations and the other aspects of the sordid relations. But I have to admit that I am not brittish so details may be wrong.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 03:47:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You're both right, other horses appear to have mostly gone to a retired horse charity, with the stipulation that the horse remains the property of the Metropolitan police and that they just get to wander around to their hearts content and not get ridden.

that the met has suddenly changed its webpage to make riding of these horses possible, is an unusual coincidence it's all a bit suspicious, but nothing you could really prove.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 04:05:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ha new from todays Leveson, Rebekah Brooks just happens to have been lent the horse coincidentally on the day she had dinner with Sir Ian Blair, commisioner of the Metropolitan police, back in the day....

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 12:28:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Shocking.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Mar 7th, 2012 at 12:31:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that may be, you should excuse the expression, a horse of a different color. Or colour.

However, if the horse-placement program (programme -- see? I'm trying) includes both too-old-to-work horses and somewhat more fit animals, it makes sense for the very old ones to be turned out to pasture.

But for a horse still fit for riding, it's better to exercise it fairly regularly. Is it possible Sir Ian was being friendly and didn't know about the shenanigans not yet exposed between the Murdock empire and the coppers?

by Mnemosyne on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 11:41:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Twitter / @SkyNewsBreak: Attorney General investiga ...
Attorney General investigating Deputy Assistant Commissioner Sue Akers corruption evidence to Leveson Inquiry, fears of contempt of court


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 6th, 2012 at 05:46:41 PM EST
Can Rebekah Brooks get a fair trial, asks her solicitor | Media | guardian.co.uk

Rebekah Brooks's solicitor, Stephen Parkinson, argues that his client cannot expect to get a fair trial because too much "prejudicial material has come into the public domain."

In a Daily Telegraph article, he complains that witnesses giving evidence at the Leveson inquiry have made accusations against Brooks, the former chief executive of News International, without any challenge. He writes:



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 03:59:10 PM EST
News International could probably engineer a mistrial by hacking everyone's phone and publishing the result on the Sun on Sunday...

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 04:08:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I've just been told that OFCOM are stepping up their fit and proper person test investigation of the Murdochs

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 04:18:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sun and NoW publisher had 'enthusiastic involvement' with police | Media | guardian.co.uk

News Group Newspapers, the publisher of the Sun and the now-closed News of the World, has been described by a high court judge of having an "enthusiastic involvement" with the police and of failing to protect the sources of a story involving the prison conditions of Soham killer Ian Huntley.

Judge Pearce-Higgins said in a pre-trial judgment that the publisher had "acted at all times in a way to protect their own interests" and "took no steps to claim the protection usually afforded to journalists in respect of their sources" during a leak enquiry handled by Durham police.

The pointed comments were made in a pre-trial judgment handed down on 28 February in Birmingham where Rupert Murdoch's newspaper group is being sued for £100,000 by a secret informant.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 05:19:04 PM EST
Trinity Mirror journalists may be victims of NoW phone hacking - police | Media | guardian.co.uk

A handful of journalists working for Trinity Mirror's Sunday titles have been told that they may have been victims of phone hacking by News of the World, in an apparent sign that the Murdoch title sought to eavesdrop on to news being gathered by its principal competitors.

Lee Harpin, head of news at the People, is among three newsdesk executives at both that newspaper and the Sunday Mirror, who have been told by the Metropolitan police that their details appear in the notebooks kept by Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator who undertook hacking for News of the World.

Trinity Mirror - the owner of the People and Sunday Mirror - has long suspected that its employees were targeted given the intense rivalry that exists in the Sunday redtop market. But it is the first time the company has learned that any of its journalists or other executives may have been victims.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 8th, 2012 at 05:20:38 PM EST
Now this is actuslly a big deal.  Coulsons NOTW through spoiling and spin wrecked a Mirror(maybe sunday) story of George and a dominatrix, and george went on to reccomend coulson for camerons spin chief post.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Mar 9th, 2012 at 07:52:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You mean this?

George Osborne feels the pain of dominatrix's claims - Crime - UK - The Independent

George Osborne faced more questions yesterday about his role in the decision to bring the former News of the World editor Andy Coulson into the heart of the Conservative Party. It followed new claims about the newspaper's treatment of a story linking the Chancellor to a former dominatrix and allegations of drug-taking.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Mar 9th, 2012 at 09:23:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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