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Despair ye who look upon my works! Part ω+1

by Colman Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:08:13 AM EST

The Irish Oireachtas (Dail and Senate) is holding hearings on the upcoming referendum. Today we have assorted ambassadors telling us why it's such a good idea:

Danish ambassador Niels Pultz said his government believed the fiscal treaty was a necessary instrument in the EU’s “common toolbox” and “should be seen as an important part of the EU’s wider efforts to combat the debt crisis”.

Addressing the first meeting of the Sub-Committee on the Referendum on the Fiscal Stability Treaty, which continues today, he said: “If all European countries had conducted sound and sustainable economic and fiscal policies in accordance with the fiscal compact, Europe would most likely not have experienced the sovereign debt crisis.”

This in a country that would have been unaffected by the constraints in the run-up to the crisis. As if the EU would have been telling their poster child for "reform" to do things differently.

The Greek Ambassador tells us:

Greek ambassador Constantina Zagorianou-Prifti said “the treaty was relatively easy for us” and “almost natural for us to accept” because “we knew the need for a new tool” for the EU.

She said “the sacrifices of the Greek people are producing results”. The primary deficit had been significantly reduced within just two years, and it had significantly regained competitiveness.

Yup, results. I guess a 77 year old shooting himself in Syntagma counts as reducing pension spending. Or possibly as a sacrifice.


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At this stage I'm rooting for the return of the Great Old Ones.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:09:27 AM EST
Do they think having the Greek Ambassador coming to sell you the treaty is going to work with the voters in the referendum?

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:16:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have no idea.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:17:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suppose it makes them feel really serious.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:17:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And yes, our dear leaders are driving thousands of Europeans to suicide and the best i can do is snark.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:19:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Athens News: Note found on Syntagma suicide victim
"The Tsolakoglou government has annihilated all traces for my survival, which was based on a very dignified pension that I alone paid for 35 years with no help from the state. And since my advanced age does not allow me a way of dynamically reacting (although if a fellow Greek were to grab a Kalashnikov, I would be right behind him), I see no other solution than this dignified end to my life, so I don't find myself fishing through garbage cans for my sustenance. I believe that young people with no future, will one day take up arms and hang the traitors of this country at Syntagma square, just like the Italians did to Mussolini in 1945"   the note said.


There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 02:22:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ahtens News: Small bomb explodes outside Simitis' office
A small bomb exploded outside the office of former prime minister Costas Simitis on Tuesday in an attack the government denounced as an attempt to destabilise the country ahead of an election.

...

The government condemned the attack.

"Any attempt to dynamite the country's road to elections will fail. Democracies aren't terrorised," government spokesman Pantelis Kapsis said.

Democracies can only be terrorised by the Troika, that is.

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 02:25:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Apparently the hashtag with the suicides name is now No 1 trending topic in Spain. It struck a chord apparently?

The riot police tonight, never wanting to be accused of excessive sentimentality or respect towards the dead, beat the hell out of a number of protesters who didn't suffocate quick enough on their tear-gas, at a massive vigil turned demo in Syntagma. The deceased was a politically active retired pharmacist, truly representative of a middle class collapsing to pauper status. The politicians he wanted to see hanged upside down like Mussolini - insisted that this was an act of personal despair, with no political significance whatsoever...



The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom - William Blake

by talos (mihalis at gmail dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 05:51:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Currently the #3 trending topic. Interesting.

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 06:10:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The riot police tonight, never wanting to be accused of excessive sentimentality or respect towards the dead, beat the hell out of a number of protesters who didn't suffocate quick enough on their tear-gas, at a massive vigil turned demo in Syntagma.

Public deaths have a way of becoming catalysts for social unrest. Witness the "Arab Spring".

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 06:13:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who is Tsolakoglou and why is everyone calling Papandreou by this name? (OCTOBER 14, 2011)

Basically, Tsolakoglou is Greek for Pétain.

Over the last few days Greek blogs have baptized Greek Prime Minister George Papandreou calling him a a "Georgios Tsolakoglou". The obvious question... Who is Tsolakoglou? The latter figure had signed the armistice treaty with the Wehrmacht and was appointed as chief of a new Nazi puppet collaborationist regime in Athens during the 1940s. He was a formal army officer who went against Greek national interests, as well as sided with foreigners against his very own people and literally surrendered the Greek Army to the Axis Occupation in 1941-1942. The result of this "betrayal" was the German plundering of Greece's resources,  which later caused food shortages, massive inflation and a devastating famine that killed as many as 100,000 Greeks.  

What a coincidence, so did our prime minister, only 70 years later!!



There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:42:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The present run in Italy is about one suicide a day. Today there were two.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 05:22:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes in Greece too, the rate has been sky-high for a while now... This was significant because it was a political statement, a bloody protest, a sort of modern-day Kostas Georgakis

The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom - William Blake
by talos (mihalis at gmail dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 05:56:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Association of Small Businesses CGIA Mestre just released stats on suicides caused by economic reasons: up 24,6 % between 2008 and 2010. I imaine it has gone up much more this year.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Apr 5th, 2012 at 05:03:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's a bit late for that, isn't it?

(Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Merkel R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn, etc.)

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 08:47:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You speak Irish now?

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 10:04:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
[nods slowly]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 10:20:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"If all European countries had conducted sound and sustainable economic and fiscal policies in accordance with the fiscal compact, Europe would most likely not have experienced the sovereign debt crisis."

False. The European crisis is a crisis of internal balance of payments and of private debt buildup. Neither of the two are constrained by any of the existing EU rules or by the proposed Fiscal Pact, because private debt is always and everywhere self-regulating because of the technical superiority of the market.

Or something.

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:14:54 AM EST
AAAS Science Insider: Greece May Not Be Able to Afford CERN

So, to keep Greece in the Euro they'll kick it out of CERN?

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:18:32 AM EST
Don't need third world countries in CERN.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:19:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They are barbarians. They will destroy everything good about the European project to make it align with their twisted world view.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:20:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Who wants to be in CERN, anyway, now that the Higgs has already been found (plus or minus 12 months)?

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 09:25:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EU Observer: Europe entering age of 'aid austerity'
Figures released Wednesday (4 April) by the OECD, a Paris-based thinktank, show that debt-ridden Greece - the recipient of two international bailouts - slashed its foreign aid by 39.3 percent in 2011.

Spain, now in the midst of an unpredicted recession and under EU pressure to sharply reduce its budget deficit, made a 32.7 percent cut last year.

Austria (-14.3%) and Belgium (-13.3%) also made significant cuts. Of the 15 richer EU member state that are part of the OECD's development assistance committee, only three - Germany, Sweden and Italy - increased their donations to poorer countries last year. Italy is on record for a massive 33 percent increase. But this is mostly due to debt forgiveness and increased refugees coming to the country.

By contrast, the six eastern, and poorer, EU member states that are members of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development all increased their foreign aid in 2011.



There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 09:48:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Spain, now in the midst of an unpredicted recession

Yeah, Who Could Have Predicted?

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 10:02:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
AP: Greek track and field body suspends operations
The move - the latest twist in Greece's nearly three-year financial freefall - is the first such action by any of the country's major sports bodies. It immediately halts all domestic track and field competitions, including track meets May 12-13 in several Greek cities.

The decision will not, however, affect the May 10 flame-lighting ceremony at Ancient Olympia, in southern Greece, for the 2012 London Olympics, or have any immediate effect on the selection of Greek athletes for those games.

...

The agency is expected to meet again in two weeks and could toughen its stance even further to include international meets like the European Championships if the Greek government fails to respond.



There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 07:39:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Almost total assimilation of European governments by the financial Borg.

Or maybe the politicians' necks should be checked for control crystals.

Invaders from Mars

Even when their nations are bleeding to death they're sticking with the overlords.

by tjbuff (timhess@adelphia.net) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 10:25:10 AM EST
Presseurop: Child labour re-emerges in Naples (Le Monde, 30 March 2012)
The Italian economic crisis has played a major role in all of this. Since 2008, a succession of financial reforms have introduced drastic cuts. In June 2010, the Campania region put an end to its minimum welfare scheme, plunging more than 130,000 families into poverty.

...

At the head of an association called Il Tappeto di Iqbal, "Iqbal's carpet", named after a Pakistani child-slave who led a revolt and was subsequently murdered, Giovanni Savino has angry words for the mafia, a failing education system, and a state "which abandons its children." In Italy, there is no automatic access to benefits. Support for the young people and their families is distributed by 150 associations, which are wholly dependent on local government financing.

Since the onset of the crisis, funding for such initiatives has been cut by 87 %: and the 20,000 educators in the Campania region, who have not been paid for two years, have to rely on their own resources to do their work. If no alternative funding is found, Il Tappeto di Iqbal will soon be forced to close down.



There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 10:54:34 AM EST
Pampered bloody southerners and their excessive welfare systems. Why should good northerners support them?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 11:02:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EUObserver: ECB cheap loans no substitute for reforms, Draghi warns
ECB chief Mario Draghi on Wednsday (4 April) said talk of an exit strategy from the one-trillion-euro cheap loans programme was "premature", but warned that this was no substitute for reforms.

...

But he insisted that governments should "take advantage of this window of opportunity and relative peace on the financial markets to undertake structural reforms".

Raising borrowing costs in Spain were a proof of "markets expecting reforms" rather than market 'volatility', Draghi said. "They (markets) are asking these governments to deliver on fiscal and structural reforms, and I don't mean Spain only," he added.



There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 4th, 2012 at 02:11:29 PM EST


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