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Weekend Open Thread

by afew Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 11:33:07 AM EST

On into the grey month


Display:
Let me mess up the place.  Too neat and clean here.

There, that's better.

by stevesim on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 11:35:39 AM EST
You forgot the nematode over there in the corner. Get the damned thing off its back for Chrissakes!
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 11:42:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Someone turn the lights on.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 11:38:33 AM EST


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 12:06:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What grey?

This afternoon in Normandy

This week-end has some high tide coefficients, so we cam to check if the caslt built last week would survive. So far, it has, even if was a real fight today.

Bu no grey anywhere.

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 12:01:25 PM EST
Plenty of grey here. I just brought in a load of firewood - just in case. A light rain was falling, even though the temps were close to 20C. Those temps are forecast to drop steadily and the precipitation is forecast to end shortly and reappear around dusk. Fortunately, freezing rain is no longer in the forecast.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 12:30:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My dad said it was 32 degrees Fahrenheit in Ventura, CA, today. (Casitas Springs, actually.)

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:16:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is nervous time for Southern California growers.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:18:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm sweeping snow here. (I actually like doing it.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 02:31:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]


"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 12:15:49 PM EST
there are some excellent french movies on youtube, in their entirety.

I habe just watched some of Lelouch's work which I hadn't seen before.

by stevesim on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 12:42:56 PM EST
Watch movies that were shot  by Henri Decaë.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 05:44:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Youtube is changing. You used to have to go to Netflix to get stuff, but recently they have lost some licensing battles and a lot of stuff is no longer available. Meanwhile, Youtube seems to have backed off the censoring and as you say, there are a lot of non-American movies on there now.

My problem is that when I try Youtube on Safari, I get "missing plugin" which just started yesterday after I removed Flash from my computer. What a surprise.

by asdf on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 07:15:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Flash has already been upgraded, you can install latest and use with confidence. Not one hundred percent certain, but my OSX loaded a new version of Java in the background and re-activated itself.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 06:52:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So, back from my little travels and managed to go through each new diary I hadn't yet read on Eurotrib (pats self on back) and I feel so informed I may not be able to sleep.  Don't want to take a train through the Netherlands anytime soon, either. Such a shame.

My visitor/best friend didn't get to see any snowfall, then flew out of Munich on Friday and, of course, the snow immediately began to fall and has hardly quit since. And people don't think nature has a sense of humor.

Nice to be back; won't leave again until early March.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:15:16 PM EST
Got your snowshoes?

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:20:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Heh... bought some when I moved here and STILL haven't used them. When the snow gets a little deeper, I'll give them a try. Maybe I'll make a (unintentionally funny) video.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:24:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:29:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mine are bit higher-tech-looking, but probably no more effective.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:30:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
(Having done it.)

Snow shoes are effective at moving across snow - much better than 'post holing' - as long as one is fine with not getting anywhere, very fast.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:40:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm retired. I no longer have to get anywhere fast. It's a luxury I highly recommend.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 02:27:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have my Polish army boots equipped with a heel spike that hinges under the instep when not required. Excellent when walking on ice.  I bought them long ago before shooting a commercial that required junior ice-hockey players in action and the camera speeding round a rink.

The native Finns seem perfectly capable of walking on smooth ice in dancing shoes - me not.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 08:31:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A friend and I were once "guiding" (LOL) three city-dwellers on a low-mountain winter hike. Snow set in seriously more than expected. We were not equipped for heavy snow. My friend and I took turns making a passage the others could follow. We were making "post-holes", as ATinNM says, about knee-deep at first, then thigh-deep, and it was becoming exhausting. Night was falling as we reached an abandoned hut (on the map but hard to find under the snow).

There was nothing in there but the remains of a large bed made of branches. We used some to light a fire in what passed for a fireplace, and got some warmth and a lot of smoke. There was no door so we built one with snow. Then got into sleeping-bags as best we could and stretched out on the "bed". Exhaustion knocked everybody out.

[During the night I opened my eyes to see light flooding in above the snow door. I got up and looked out (the "door" was about shoulder height). There was a huge full moon out there shining on the perfect white snow. A silver fox chose that moment to slink across the tract of snow in front of the hut, and down towards the stream. If life is a movie, that was a good sequence.]

By morning the clouds were back and it was snowing again. We had to get out, but getting lost in the transformed landscape in continuing snow was a distinct possibility. On the other side of the valley the map showed a track that led to a hydro-electric dam higher up. We decide to cross to it and follow it down.

By this time the "post-holes" were waist-deep. Then we happened on some holly bushes under the snow, dug them out and cut withies that we interlaced to make snowshoes. We fixed them on our feet with strips torn from a towel someone had brought along. The hassle was that they kept coming apart and had to be interlaced again. But they worked. We could walk without sinking too deep.

By afternoon we reached the other side of the valley (no, we weren't fast). We got on to the track. At that moment, a snowplough came zooming up, clearing the track to the hydro-electric stuff above. Goodbye snowshoes! Two hours' easy walk down and we were out.

Moral 1: even if they look funny, snowshoes can be useful.

Moral 2: always check the weather forecast thoroughly before going out, even in low mountains, and be properly equipped. But we were young and foolish, and I'd give a lot to be young and foolish again. (Beats being old and foolish, anyway).

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 06:02:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So many of us have had such amazing adventures in life shared on ET, one reason i love it here so much. only wish we had afew more stories.

"hey Grandpaw, tell us about the time the Mohawks attacked the S-Bahn."

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 06:56:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
from a very active holiday, where I covered ground in both wintry and tropical climes.  Moreso in the former than the latter.  The train ride down the Hudson was very nice, although the sun had set during the last stretch.  Sorry to hear about this mishap; I was on that particular ferry catamaran scarcely two weeks ago and thought it was going to tip over during the windy stormy day I chose to travel on.  Perhaps the captain needs a bit more training.

As for the tropical part of my excursion, let's just say I was here.  I'm currently back home and at the office getting absolutely nothing done! ;-)

"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne

by maracatu on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:38:30 PM EST
Ericsson joins the patent troll bonanza:

Unwired Planet, formerly Openwave Systems, said in a regulatory filing today that it has received more than 1,900 patents, including 753 US patents, from Swedish telecom company Ericsson.

There's not much to Unwired Planet beyond its patents. The operating parts of Openwave were sold off before the transformation to Unwired last April. In September, Unwired launched patent suits against Apple and Google, following a time-tested recipe: use patents on old, unsuccessful technology to ask for royalties on new, popular technology. It also had cases against Apple and RIM at the International Trade Commission, but dropped them in October.

Unless something is done, fairly soon, this nonsense is going to smother new product development.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 01:54:14 PM EST
interesting job offer

https://jobsearch.direct.gov.uk/GetJob.aspx?JobID=634623&JobTitle=Wolf+Boy%2fGirl&q=circus&a mp;rad=20&rad_units=miles&pp=25&sort=rv.dt.di&vw=b&re=134&setype=2&AVSDM =

by stevesim on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 02:40:29 PM EST
Must have a minimum of 60,000 hairs growing on the face and linking up with the hairline, hair on the head is not included.
Google informs me that the average number of hairs a man has on the face is around 30,000.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 02:45:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Euro Election poll

Twitter / MarkJLittlewood: Latest ComRes poll: Lab 35% ...

Latest ComRes poll: Lab 35% UKIP 23% Con 22% Lib 8%



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:01:13 PM EST
With those numbers, the Coalition experience will wipe out the entire Lib Dem representation in the European Parliament. And they are a truly committed, hardworking bunch of pro-european politicians. A pity, really...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:04:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Holy shit.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:23:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's meaningless; come the election the media will be lockstep for the Tories, sowing fear, uncertainty and doubt about labour.

It'll be really close

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:37:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When looking at the poll, you saw Lab at a towering 35%, I saw two crazy parties at a combined 45%...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 02:38:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Or one crazy party with a vicious fascist wing and an utterly insane fascist wing - much like the US, and most other Western 'democracies'.

I've seen serious mutterings in the UK about:

  1. The creation of an independent Youth Parliament, with no policy power but plenty of PR influence.

  2. The creation of independent 'Not the Usual Lot' candidates who have a loose national affiliation but are all locally based.

I don't think either would change voting patterns, but they might make a start on breaking the toxic lock-down of newsie PR herding and neofascist monetarist policy that passes for representative democracy here.

Then again, I quite like the idea of the coalition MPs losing their jobs to UKIP with a clear Labour majority - at least for one cycle.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 03:14:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
ThatBritGuy:
The creation of independent 'Not the Usual Lot' candidates who have a loose national affiliation but are all locally based.

sounds like the italian 5* movement.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 08:26:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The point is that this is a European Parliament election poll, so the UKIP is likely to do well as the system is proportional representation and, being a second-order election, people are not afraid of "wasting their vote".

If this were a poll for a general election, a lot of those polling UKIP would revert to voting Tory on election day, as you say.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 03:35:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
From NYT (so might not load)
Aaron Swartz, Precocious Programmer and Internet Activist, Dies at 26


Aaron Swartz, a wizardly programmer who as a teenager helped to develop code that delivered ever-changing Web content to users and later became a steadfast crusader to make that information freely available, was found dead on Friday in his New York apartment, an apparent suicide.
....
At 14, Mr. Swartz helped create RSS, the nearly ubiquitous software that allows users to subscribe to online information. Later, he became even more of an Internet folk hero, pushing to make many Web files free and open to the public. But in July 2011, he was indicted on federal charges of gaining illegal access to JSTOR, a subscription-only service for distributing scientific and literary journals, and downloading 4.8 million articles and documents, nearly the entire library.

Charges in the case, including wire fraud and computer fraud, were pending at the time of Mr. Swartz's death, carrying potential penalties of up to 35 years in prison and $1 million in fines.

"Aaron built surprising new things that changed the flow of information around the world," said Susan Crawford, a professor at Cardozo School of Law in New York who served in the Obama administration as a technology adviser. She called Mr. Swartz "a complicated prodigy," and said "graybeards approached him with awe."



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:16:07 PM EST
The tragedy is most of the papers on JSTOR came out of research supported by public funds.  JSTOR itself was a response to the explosion of academic journals with astronomical subscription prices.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:51:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, JSTOR....

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 04:48:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There was a time when people could use public libraries without having to break into them.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 06:41:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Pretty much.  I'm somewhat fortunate, because my alma mater is just down the road, and as an alumnus I can get access to pretty much anything they have.

I think the general public can too, but they have to jump through a few hoops.  But even setting that aside, most people don't have that kind of access to academic literature where they live.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 11:55:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The University of Iowa library, in Iowa City, was open to all residents of the state of Iowa.  Only to prove residence for them to issue a card, granting full access.  This was before J$TOR, don't know what the deal is now.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 12:14:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think that's basically the deal at FSU.  Fill out some forms to show residency or (if you still have it) show them your old student ID to prove alumni status, and you're good to go.

Not so bad for what you get.  It's an all-world awesome library.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 12:51:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Matt Stoller on Naked Capitalism.
But he was driven by a desire for justice, and not just for open information. He wanted an end to the drug war, he wanted a financial system not dominated by Bob Rubin, and he wanted monetary policy run to help ordinary people. Some of his last tweets are on monetary policy, and the platinum coin option for raising the debt ceiling (which is a round-about way of preventing cuts to social welfare programs for the elderly). Aaron was a liberal who saw class and race as core driving forces in American politics. In a lovely essay on how he organized his career, he made this clear in a very charming but pointed way.
So how did I get a job like mine? Undoubtedly, the first step is to choose the right genes: I was born white, male, American. My family was fairly well-off and my father worked in the computer industry. Unfortunately, I don't know of any way of choosing these things, so that probably isn't much help to you.

But, on the other hand, when I started I was a very young kid stuck in a small town in the middle of the country. So I did have to figure out some tricks for getting out of that. In the hopes of making life a little less unfair, I thought I'd share them with you.

Making "life a little less unfair." Those aren't the words of a techno-utopianist, those are the words of a liberal political organizer. They remind me of how Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren has described her own work. Aaron knew life would always be unfair, but that was no reason not to try to make society better. He had no illusions about power but maintained hope for our society if, I suppose, not always for himself. This is a very difficult way to approach the world, but it's why he was so heroic in how he acted. I want people to understand that Aaron sought not open information systems, but justice. Aaron believed passionately in the scientific method as a guide for organizing our society, and in that open-minded but powerful critique, he was a technocratic liberal. His leanings sometimes moved him towards more radical postures because he recognized that our governing institutions had become malevolent, but he was not an anarchist.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Jan 14th, 2013 at 11:22:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Mr. Wolf said he would remember his nephew, who had written in the past about battling depression and suicidal thoughts, as a young man who "looked at the world, and had a certain logic in his brain, and the world didn't necessarily fit in with that logic, and that was sometimes difficult."


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jan 14th, 2013 at 11:34:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My Dad's 90th birthday today. My enjoyment of the proceedings has been somewhat dampened by having a relapse on my virus.

I managed to join in the afternoon but am now in bed

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:19:08 PM EST
well many happy returns to him, and get better, to you!
by stevesim on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:28:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Damn, that's a pretty solid run.  Many happy returns!

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:38:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Uproar over plans for Starbucks in Montmartre - Telegraph

It was a favourite Parisian haunt of Hemingway and Picasso, and today is a hive of painters, street artists and cartoonists.

But defenders of Montmartre's Place du Tertre warn past artistic luminaries would be turning in their grave to learn that the Paris district's fabled square is about to become home to a Starbucks coffee shop.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:30:34 PM EST
Sounds logical: the place is full of Americans anyway...
"Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded."
by Bernard on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 04:02:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It depends when you go there, Jan 1st it was packed, but on 3rd it had been raining during the day so the restaurants hadn't put out tables and most artists hadn't bothered to set up. But it had stopped raining, and xmas lights were still up and were reflected by the damp cobbles. It was lovely:

a-pl-tertre-paris-jan3-2013-0448

There have been too many Americans all over Paris for decades, Hemingway and friends complained about it in the 1920s. Apart from sometimes being rather loud, today the younger ones irritate when they "like, use 'like', like almost every other, like, word".

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 06:28:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm, like, WTF?!?

I don't think I've ever seen the Place du Tertre that empty, though (like LEP) I used to live in Montmartre.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 02:17:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't know how it is over there, but at least in the U.S, Starbucks employees get decent benefits. I'm thinking of quitting my regular job and becoming a barista just for that reason alone.

It is simply amazing what U.S. corporations are doing to their employees on the medical benefits front this year. I don't think the implications have sunk in for a lot people yet, but they will over the next few months as people go in for their pills or sore knees and come out with bills for $3000 for a few minutes of consultation time--$3000 that they have to pay out of their own pocket.

All blamed on Obamacare which doesn't really go into effect until next year, mostly.

by asdf on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 07:19:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is what happens, rather predictably, when corporate friendly regulations are in place and the writing of rules is left in the hands of industry insiders. It is as though the Obama Administration did not care that the predictable reaction of the insurance industry would make the reform repugnant before it went into effect.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 12:52:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
US Govt petitions - This Isn't the Petition Response You're Looking For

"The Administration shares your desire for job creation and a strong national defense, but a Death Star isn't on the horizon. Here are a few reasons:"

They neglect to add that building a Death Star would require the disarmament and enslavement of the whole American people so that they can be compelled to work on the project. This would require the organisational skills of a person capable of levels of evil previously unimagined. Sadly Mr Cheney has chosen not to make himself available.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:32:48 PM EST
Really was an excellent response.  One thing ill give the Obama folks: They do have something resembling a sense of humor.  Missing far too often in Washington.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 03:40:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mother Jones: Glenn Beck Building Ayn Rand-Inspired Utopia (January 11, 2013)

No, really...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 04:36:08 PM EST
These things are popping-up all over since Obama was re-elected in November.  (An amazing coinky-dinky, I'm sure.)  Unfortunately all of them go down to massive FAIL! and we don't get rid of the morons.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 05:22:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would call one a success were it just to get rid of the morons involved.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 12:59:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know why he needs to built this, because it already exists. It's called Orange County, California.
by asdf on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 11:30:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Typing from my new iPad mini.  Why the hell was Apple not making them this size from the beginning?  Glorious.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 04:50:55 PM EST
Steve Jobs had to die for Apple to realise that Samsung had the perfect 7 inch form factor.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 04:58:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Because in a few weeks you'll realize that it's still too big, and that what you wanted was an iPod Touch all along?
by asdf on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 07:20:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope, it's perfect now.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 07:34:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Boringly - but I suspect conceptually linked to the cold fusion diary I haven't read yet - they hadn't worked out how to make it that size and have a decent battery. And screens were not up to the job at the time. etc. A bunch of engineering implementation challenges.
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 03:20:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect that was definitely a major factor.  They might've been able to do it, but even if they could've, it would've been too expensive.

I think the larger form factor was probably also helpful to establish it in consumers' minds as something more than simply a large iPod Touch.  Had the mini been the original, that criticism would've been much louder and more credible.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 11:52:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Because it's too small. And the screen is shit. And they couldn't build it anyway: they built the iPhone when they could, the iPad when they could and the Mini when they could.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 11:58:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Whatever the many reasons, it's exquisite, as I'm sure Sam has told you.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 03:49:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm digging my note 2, which is a mini-mini tablet. (I won't use the word that has been coined for the form factor)

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 10:04:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Came across Billmon's explanation of the Speaker, the House, the Leninism and how it all came to be in the last decades.

Daily Kos: House broken: How the GOP legislative machine turned into a doomsday device

The upshot of all this is that the House of Representatives--one of the two heads on the shoulders of our bicameral congressional beast--has been rendered largely irrelevant. The GOP majority can't even negotiate with itself, much less with anyone else.

How did we reach this point? And can a broken House be put back into some kind of working order in time to head off a fiscal disaster? I have serious doubts.



A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 07:08:40 AM EST
...grey?

I'll admit that the first week the Dutchlands were a drab messy affair, particularly weather-wise. But the winter queen has now arrived here in full majesty.

Below picture is a little rough, as I'm still adjusting to smart phones, but here's yesterday's announcement of clear skies to come:

I'll add today's glorious, cloudless sky - after I come back cycling. It's a crisp minus two C - and I'm off.

by Nomad on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 07:54:55 AM EST
It rained all last night and all today here. But the rain is needed, so OK.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 11:51:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Delft, 13 January
by Nomad on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 12:26:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
NRA Still Winning the School Safety Debate

Despite being mercilessly mocked by the MSM for suggesting armed police officers be put in schools -- a program the NRA dubbed the National School Shield program -- the idea has quickly taken hold all around the country. From Texas to Virginia to Staten Island to Sandy Hook Elementary itself, parents are demanding that their children be afforded armed protection rather than trust their luck to gun-free zone designations that determined murderers tend not to comply with.

Speechless.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 02:36:55 PM EST
why?  when have the American people seemed sane wrt guns?
by stevesim on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 02:49:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Two weeks ago I posted a diary on stories of ancestors I recorded in my wider family, on the occassion that I drew family trees as Christmas present. Shortly after, I got in contact with a very distant relative on another continent (my twice-step-great-aunt-fifth-grade-in-law, no less), who for years has been trying to clear up the same family tree mystery I was.

As we set out to re-check sources with renewed enthusiasm, we discovered that the genealogy-fanatic Mormons, who put church records all across Europe on microfilm (something both of us learnt about years ago), put a large part of their insanely big database online.

I spent every night last week browsing it, but I'm far from finished with the records of just one location (among about half a dozen relevant to that branch of my ancestry). Still, I could already confirm every detail of a letter written by a then over 90-year old woman about her grandparents to great-great-grandparents in the 1960s and go back one further generation; and found that all the encyclopaedia are wrong about the birth dates of two of my more well-known distant relatives.

This is difficult detective work: in the period I'm intested in and the site has sources for (18th and early 19th century), the pastors who kept the books had script of changing quality, all of them preferred different spellings for the same names, some of them made several errors (like baptising a son under one name and burying him a year later under another name), most parents had 8-10 children (more than half of whom died early and their names were given again to younger siblings), and parents used the same 5-6 male resp. female given names (so there were several name-sakes even in a single village). I think I'll be at it for months at least.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 03:13:24 PM EST
Bolzano is usually bilingual, but they sometimes recognize the third.

by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 03:20:15 PM EST
http://www.theclashblog.com/the-1970s-in-4-hours/

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 08:07:09 PM EST


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