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1 February 2013

by In Wales Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:38:50 PM EST

Your take on today's news media


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by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:13:49 PM EST
Human Rights Watch: Russia crackdowns worst since Soviet era | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

The US-based organization Human Rights Watch has called 2012 the "worst year for human rights in Russia." It called the level of repression on civil society comparable to that of the Soviet era.

Measures to silence government opponents reached "unprecedented levels" last year, due in large part to Russian President Vladimir Putin, who began his third term in May, according to the Human Rights Watch Europe and Central Asia Director Hugh Williamson on Thursday.

The assessment of human rights in Russia accompanied the New York-based organization's report on the state of human rights worldwide.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:21:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bad I can accept, but worse then the years of outright maffia rule on the streets? Worse then when Jeltsin couped the state and starved the people after sending tanks to shoot at the parliament? Worse then the years of outright warfare in Chechnya?

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 04:02:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's the difference between anarchy (and war) and repression. "Human rights" implies a functioning government (there are no measurable human rights in Somalia because there is no government)

Going to the source :
Russia: Worst Crackdown Since Soviet Era | Human Rights Watch

(Moscow) - The Kremlin in 2012 unleashed the worst political crackdown in Russia's post-Soviet history, Human Rights Watch said today in its World Report 2013. The authorities introduced a series of restrictive laws, harassed and intimidated activists, and interfered in the work of nongovernmental organizations, crushing hopes for reform following the winter 2011 mass protests.

So this has been paraphrased by DW. In fact "worst political crackdown in Russia's post-Soviet history" is clear, and clearly true.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 04:30:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That is a more limited claim. Still have a hard time seeing what happened in 2012 as a worse political crackdown then what happened in 1993.

2012:

A June law introduced limits on public assembliesand raised relevant financial sanctions to the level of criminal fines, re-criminalized libel, and imposed new restrictions on internet content.

A July law forces nongovernmental organizations that engage in advocacy work and accept foreign funding to register as "foreign agents," a move Human Rights Watch said aimed to demonize nongovernmental organizations in the public eye. Another law, adopted in November, expands the definition of "treason" in ways that could criminalize involvement in international human rights advocacy.

In December, Putin signed a law allowing the suspension of nongovernmental organizations, and the freezing of their assets, if they engage in "political" activities and receive funding from US citizens or organizations. Organizations can be similarly sanctioned if their leaders or members are Russian citizens who also have US passports.

1993:

The "second October Revolution", as mentioned, saw the deadliest street fighting in Moscow since 1917. Police said, on October 8, that 187[citation needed] had died in the conflict and 437 had been wounded. Communist sources named much higher numbers: up to 2,000 dead.[citation needed]

More 1993:

In the weeks following the storming of the Russian White House, Yeltsin issued a barrage of presidential decrees intended to consolidate his position. On October 5, Yeltsin banned political leftist and nationalist organizations and newspapers like Den', Sovetskaya Rossiya and Pravda that had supported the parliament (they would later resume publishing).[46] In an address to the nation on October 6, Yeltsin also called on those regional Soviets that had opposed him--by far the majority--to disband. Valery Zorkin, chairman of the Constitutional Court, was forced to resign. The chairman of the Federation of Independent Trade Unions was also sacked. The anti-Yeltsin TV broadcast 600 Seconds of Alexander Nevzorov was ultimately closed down.

Putin bans ngos from receiving foreign funds, Jeltsin banned hostile organisations outright. Putin jails opponents, Jeltsin shot opponents. And so on.

So even sticking to the first 21 articles of human rights and ignoring social, economic and cultural rights, as western human rights organisations often do, it is incorrect. Furthermore it builds on the narrative where Jeltsin times was some kind of high point of Russian democracy and Russia is slipping further and further into dictatorship with Putin as president. This conveniently ignores that Russia was not a democracy under Jeltsin, it was a looting-friendly dictatorship.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 08:40:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But as you note, 1993 was a constitutional crisis, bordering on civil war, not a "political crackdown". It's best described as an authoritarian putsch by Yeltsin, who broke the power of parliament (unconstitutionally) and finally only gained control through the army. And thus was able to proceed with gutting the Russian economy for the profit of his cronies.

The consequences for human rights were undoubtedly overwhelmingly negative, at least in theory, but the country was in chaos, so in practical application that's debatable. And the apologists for an inherently authoritarian Russian nation will tell us that it was all for the best, because Russians need an authority to obey in order to behave themselves.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 08:56:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
eurogreen:
The consequences for human rights were undoubtedly overwhelmingly negative, at least in theory, but the country was in chaos, so in practical application that's debatable.

In theory?! Is driving people into poverty not a violation of human rights for you? But hey, for the apologists the country was "in chaos", so that seems to be okay.

by Katrin on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 09:14:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, actually on reflection I concede ASKOD's point that the 1993 events were far worse for human rights, especially insofar as they put an end to any hope of a parliamentary democracy. And I concede his other point that HRW's agenda in minimising 1993 by comparison with 2012 is prety clear.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 09:19:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not really going to comment on most of the content in this article, as I've no basis to judge it one way or the other.  However, I do want to say that "interfering with the work of NGO's" should hardly qualify as an infringement of basic human rights.

Anyone can create an NGO, and lots of people with rather suspect agendas have done exactly that.  Some NGO's act as the propaganda arm of the US government and large corporations.  Some of them have no purpose other than to push the neo-liberal agenda.  For a country like Russia to interfere with those sorts of NGO's is a legitimate part of basic counter-espionage.

by Zwackus on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 09:21:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is not a particularly credible organisation.
by redstar on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 04:41:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
oh, and human rights are just fine, and improving, in Russia?

I mean, choose any thermometer you like, but they point out some objective phenomena, Russia is moving away from the direction of a liberal democracy.

Or perhaps your objection is less a question of credibility than of objective.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 04:51:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think human rights in Russia are great, but I don't think they are, say, as terrible as a country which employs the same torture techniques for which certain Japanese officials were executed as war criminals 60 odd years ago. It is also an organisation with an historical grudge against communist régimes, which has informed its stance on things it should have been all over (remember the Coup d'état against Hugo Chavez ten years ago? What did HRW say about that? Nothing.)

They're pretty good on Middle East affairs, but their record is spotty outside of that. And anyhow...it's hard to believe Russia's Human Rights record is worse now than what most westerners think of as Soviet times (eg, Stalin). That sort of rhetoric should be a clue that something isn't particularly serious in this report.

by redstar on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 05:33:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What their report actually says is that last year was the "worst political crackdown in Russia's post-Soviet history".

Do you actually disagree, or are you more interested in shooting the messenger?

As I said, they are promoting an agenda (liberal democracy or whatever; generally, communist regimes don't rate high on that scale); and they concentrate on government domestic policy : a failed coup doesn't even register on their human-rights scale; nor does foreign interference.

I'm not suggesting they are even-handed. But unless you buy the Putin defense (any suggestion of a human rights problem is a violation of Russia's sovereignty) they seem to be right on the money with respect to Russia in 2012.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 05:50:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
eurogreen:
As I said, they are promoting an agenda (liberal democracy or whatever; generally, communist regimes don't rate high on that scale); and they concentrate on government domestic policy : a failed coup doesn't even register on their human-rights scale; nor does foreign interference.

HRW appears to disagree, though they by and large expresses understanding of Jeltsin's actions.

UNHCR | Refworld | Human Rights Watch World Report 1994 - Russia

The Supreme Soviet had throughout 1993 undermined President Boris Yeltsin's reform program and executive power in Russia. Although President Yeltsin's September 21 decree suspending parliament, which sparked the armed uprising, violated key articles of the Russian constitution, he was supported in his action by the heads of state of many democratic governments including the United States. But the consequences of Yeltsin's decision and his actions in the aftermath of the violence were very damaging to human rights in Russia.

Lots and lots about the coup there.

eurogreen:

But unless you buy the Putin defense (any suggestion of a human rights problem is a violation of Russia's sovereignty) they seem to be right on the money with respect to Russia in 2012.

That they are right on substance 2012 does not mean that their narrative is right.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 08:52:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
repression similar to Soviet times. So you are incorrect.

And it doesn't matter- HRW is not credible.

by redstar on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 09:53:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, that "Worst Crackdown Since Soviet Era" quote was directly pulled from their press release. To show that I'm incorrect, you'll have to quote something in the report referring to "repression similar to Soviet times". I can't find it. The Russian section starts at page 460 of the HRW report.

And as has been discussed, one doesn't have to agree with HRW's narrative to find their report useful. It's full of facts which illustrate that 2012 was indeed a very bad year for human rights in Russia.

But we already knew that.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 10:04:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
blurb we're all responding to, in which:

The US-based organization Human Rights Watch has called 2012 the "worst year for human rights in Russia." It called the level of repression on civil society comparable to that of the Soviet era.

Straight from the article.

by redstar on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 10:17:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
initial response that this was a mischaracterisation by DW, not an actual quote from anything from HRW.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 10:30:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
eurogreen:
Russia is moving away from the direction of a liberal democracy.

Russia never was there. Russia more and more is a state again, and this state is authoritarian. A considerable part of the Russian population (possibly a majority) finds that better than what they had before, when nobody stopped the looting.
by Katrin on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 05:54:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I see no connection between repressing individual freedoms and halting economic banditism; except insofar as an authoritarian ruling clique wants to establish a monopoly on both.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:14:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And I don't see a powerbase for anything better, at present that is.
by Katrin on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:29:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As long as they can get away with clamping down on human rights, by definition no other power base can emerge.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:45:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you really think so? If people thought that they had a chance to something better, they would fight for it. At present the only existing alternative are liberals.
by Katrin on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 08:07:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators were prepared to turn out against Putin in 2012 (were they merely "liberals"?). This scared him enough that he significantly hardened legislation against protest. It's been clear for years now that he will not allow any political party with a serious chance of popular support to be created (except for the good old Communists of course, and his own partisans and stooges).

The only door left open for those who wish for a change in regime would seem to be violent revolution. But Putin is a jump ahead on that score too : he is reintroducing Cossack militias :

Russian Cossacks test their powers in Moscow street patrol | Reuters

By tradition, Cossacks protected Russia's borderlands, but on Tuesday descendants of the Tsarist warrior caste patrolled a patch of central Moscow as part of a resurgence encouraged by President Vladimir Putin.

A handful of men in high lambswool hats and epaulettes paced a slushy square around a major railway station, looking for illegal trade and other infractions in what they called a trial run for further patrols in the heart of the Russian capital.

While a few venders in a chilly underpass left when Cossacks approached, the patrol - unarmed and outnumbered by journalists - was uneventful for a group with a reputation as whip-wielding horseback warriors protecting frontiers from foreign threats.

But it was a sign of a Cossack revival that plays into Putin's calls for patriotism and his praise of Russian traditions - and which critics say aggravates the ethnic tension the president has struggled to keep under control.

"Our aim is very clear: we want there to be law and order in the capital, for people to live and work honestly and for crime to be punished," said Vladimir Timofeyev, who identified himself as a "Cossack colonel" and wore a green camouflage coat.



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 08:28:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hundreds of thousands is not that impressive out of a population that large, Eurogreen. I note that discontent with Putin simply doesn't translate into considerable support for an opposition that is liberal.

Why do you use quotes for "liberals"?

by Katrin on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 09:19:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As mentioned below, "hundreds of thousand" represent less than one percent of a population. I suspect there are more UKIP supporters in UK, and they are repressed more thoroughly than thousands you refer to. Plus, no Russian newspaper gives UKIP as much voice and support as these guys get in Guardian and NYT, so UKIP supporters must be treated even more unfairly.

Today's Cossacks are just an ethnographic curiosity. To refer to "a group with a reputation as whip-wielding horseback warriors protecting frontiers from foreign threats" is a gross fear-mongering, like comparing Norwegians to Vikings or Hungarians to Magyars of a millennium ago. Not a big surprise, this being reporting about Russia where everything goes.  

by Sargon on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:50:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
eurogreen:
I see no connection between repressing individual freedoms and halting economic banditism; except insofar as an authoritarian ruling clique wants to establish a monopoly on both.

Regime that represses human rights and allows economic banditism was praised by the west, regime that represses human rights and halts economic banditism is pillored by the west. Putin has actually covered both cathegories, he was good until he went after the oil.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 08:54:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Court allows murder charges against NSU suspect Zschäpe | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

The Munich regional appeal court has reportedly allowed murder charges to be brought against alleged National Socialist Underground (NSU) member Beate Zschäpe. The decision followed her indictment in November.

Judges determined on Thursday that there was sufficient evidence in the far-right terrorism case to bring Zschäpe before a court on murder charges, according to reports in numerous German newspapers. However, the court's spokeswoman declined to confirm the news.

News agencies DPA and AFP said two defense attorney - Wolfgang Stahl and Anja Sturm, respectively - had confirmed that court's decision.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:22:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver.com / Defence / Nato chief: EU must spend more on military

BRUSSELS - Nato chief Anders Fogh Rasmussen has urged EU countries to spend more on defence despite the economic crisis or risk losing US solidarity.

He said in a statement in the alliance's report on 2012, out on Thursday (31 January), that: "If current defence spending trends were to continue, that would limit the practical ability of Nato's European nations to work together with their North American allies. But it would also risk weakening the political support for our alliance in the United States."

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:29:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There's nothing in that statement I don't see as a good thing

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:53:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
With the Nazi War Machine poised to ....  uh

With the Red Army in ... er

A-rabs!  A-rab TERRORISTS!!! MOOSE-LEMS ON THE RAMPAGE!

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 01:08:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver.com / Social Affairs / German court confirms social rights for Bulgarians
BERLIN - EU citizens from Bulgaria and Romania are entitled to healthcare and social benefits in Germany even without a valid working permit, a German court has said in a ruling that may overturn welfare restrictions sought by the German government.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:30:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good morning Mr Cameron, hello Mr Osborne

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi
by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 02:18:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
even so, I wouldn't wish being a "customer" of the UK "benefit" system on anybody

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:54:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver.com / Economic Affairs / EU railway law to halt 'stagnation, decline'

BRUSSELS - The European Commission has proposed breaking up national railway monopolies to save passengers money and to stop industry "stagnation."

The draft law, put out on Wednesday (30 January) in Brussels by transport commissioner Siim Kallas, says state giants, such as Germany's Deutsche Bahn or Italy's Ferrovie della Stato, should be split in two, with one part responsible for infrastructure and the other part to run passenger services.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:30:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe they could first detail what stagnation and decline is being suffered and how being split in two will address that. Besides "freedom", of course

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:56:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They completely fail to mention that France, which had implemented the separation in exemplary fashion, is now going back on it, in the interests of efficiency and cost saving.

Perhaps more significant in that article :

EUobserver.com / Economic Affairs / EU railway law to halt 'stagnation, decline'

In other measures, the European Railway Agency (ERA), based in Valenciennes, France, is to issue EU-wide "safety passports" for railway vehicles and operators.

The commission said EU countries have 11,000 different safety rules in place and that it can take two years and cost €6 million to get permits for a new locomotive to operate abroad.

It said the ERA move will save firms €500 million by 2025.



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:59:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cheered in Mali, Hollande still losing the war at home - FRANCE - FRANCE 24

President François Hollande faced on Thursday the first nationwide strike by French civil servants since he took office last May. Hollande, a Socialist, has been hailed at home and abroad for routing Mali-based Islamists with a lightening military intervention, but he is quickly falling out of favour among his key voting constituencies.

Thousands of civil servants, including hospital personnel and teachers, took to the streets in Paris and across the country to demand better pay and more jobs. Unions organising around 120 marches throughout France said they would rally around 100,000 people.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:32:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tories tell PM: lift poll ratings or face revolt | Politics | The Guardian

Downing Street has been warned that David Cameron risks facing a confidence vote over his leadership in the summer of 2014 if his poll ratings fail to improve and the party performs poorly in the local elections.

A diehard group of party rebels, who would like to remove the prime minister immediately, will significantly grow in numbers over the next 17 months if the Tories fail to achieve a breakthrough, according to MPs inside and outside the government.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:34:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's called a performance incentive, in modern parlance.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 04:32:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think these rebels compare themselves to the groups which led to Mrs thatcher's resignation and the surprise election win afterwards.

However, the difference is that Thatcher was becoming too extreme for the country and was replaced by a moderate (who privatised railways, for which we're still paying).

Cameron is the moderate now, and his only possible replacements come from the lunatic wing of the party. they may think the poll numbers under Cameron are bad, well replace him and see them really plummet

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:00:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@MigeruBlogger
Migeru Shimbun is out! http://paper.li/MigeruBlogger/1351816577 ... ▸ Top stories today via @GFVara @sdanthine @infobancaetica


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 06:26:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence Daily Morning Newsbriefing: El Pais says 70% of the donations were illegal (01.02.2013)
More allegations have surfaced in the bribery scandal, as El Pais claims that most of the donations violated Spain's party funding laws; more than 30 donations recorded in the list exceeded the official party funding cap that was in place between 1987 and 2007; the People's Party will convene its executive committee for an extraordinary meeting this Saturday; Mariano Rajoy threatens to take anyone to court "who spreads lies"; he insists that he has complied with the law at all times; the high court judge, who investigates the case, has asked prosecutors to look into the latest allegations; a poll shows that 96% of Spaniards believe that corruption is rampant; the president of Spain's Senate appears to have confirmed one of the allegations made in El Pais; the IMF expects Spain to propose stimulus policies, as the economy sinks deeper into a depression; Spain's stock market regulator lifts the short selling ban; Mario Monti is seeking to benefit politically from the Monte dei Paschi di Siena scandal by attacking Pier Luigi Barsani and his party's connections to the foundation that owns MPS; Bersani said this was a bit rich coming from someone who used to be in the employ of Goldman Sachs; Berlusconi's PdL has continued to close gaps in the polls, the latest of which shows a 5 point lead for Bersani's PD; President Giorgio Napolitano seeks to play down the MPS scandal, and says it is time to look to the future; the Bank of Italy seeks to ringfence Mario Draghi from the scandal; prosecutors launched two more probes - one in respect of insider dealing, and another over supervisory failures; German inflation fells to 1.7% in January, as price-level adjustment in the eurozone comes to a halt; German unemployment is down to 6.8% in January, close to the lowest post-unification level, but German retail sales slumped 4.7% yoy in December; Latvia adopts legislation to prepare for the adoption of the euro in 2014; Eurostat has launched a new EU-wide housing index, which showed a 2.5% fall in house price yoy in Q3; Philip Stephens, meanwhile, says predictions of the eurozone's demise have been exaggerated, and says the future was neither a federation, nor a breakup.


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 05:28:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:14:09 PM EST
Merkel meets with Italy's Monti, "optimistic" on EU budget deal | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has met with Italy's prime minister, Mario Monti, in Berlin a week ahead of renewed EU budget talks. Merkel said she is "very optimistic" that a deal will be reached.

Meeting with Italian Prime Minister Monti on Thursday in Berlin, the German chancellor expressed optimism that a deal on the European Union's 2014-2020 budget would be reached during next week's summit.

"I am very optimistic that on the question of the long-term EU budget, we will be successful, that we will get an agreement," Merkel said, standing next to Monti in the Chancellery in Berlin.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:16:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EU foreign ministers to resume aid to Mali | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

Foreign ministers from the 27-nation bloc have agreed to reinstate the economic aid program to Mali in light of recent political progress. They have also called for a quicker deployment of African troops.

The meeting in Brussels concluded on Thursday with a series of recommendations to international forces on how best to move forward in the intervention, which aims to restore peace to the Sahel country. Notable among the EU's plans was the gradual renewal of over 200 millions euros ($275 million) in economic aid, which had been suspended last year after a military coup plunged Mali into chaos.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:20:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Grimsson: IMF learned new lessons in Iceland | Business | DW.DE | 31.01.2013
The global financial crisis brought Iceland to the brink of collapse in 2008. Since then, the country has recovered well by doing many things differently from the rest of the world, President Olafur Grimsson tells DW.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:23:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good stuff.

(I love how when he mentions taxpayers his first example is "fishermen".)


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:29:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"When all is said and done, life is first and foremost salt fish." -- Halldór Laxness

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:44:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As long as you don't feed it to your dog and let the dog in the house.

"Ten steps to happiness? I reckon I can do it in three and two of those are gin. The third is pickled fish, in case anyone interested."
-Sandy Toksvig, on the News Quiz


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:51:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of my Friday Night pleasures is to listen to the podcast of the News Quiz as I fall asleep.  

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:58:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Herring in wine sauce ...

yummie

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 01:24:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Struggling Spain looks to tackle corruption | Europe | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

Corruption wasn't openly discussed in Spain for years, but now as many struggle economically the issue is coming to the fore. However, the big question of whether anything will change remains.

Rodrigo Rato is both happy and worried. The former Spanish economic minister and International Monetary Fund director recently landed a job as a consultant to Spanish telecommunications giant Telefonica but has also been hauled into court for his mismanagement of Spain's second largest savings bank, Caja Madrid.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:28:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:14:24 PM EST
Russia, Arab League criticize 'Israeli airstrike' on Syria | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

The Foreign Ministry in Moscow has said Israeli airstrikes in Syria, if confirmed, would constitute "a grave violation of the UN charter." A US newspaper reported that officials in Washington were forewarned by Israel.

Russia's Foreign Ministry said on Thursday that it was urgently investigating reports of Israeli airstrikes in Syria (note: the Israeli jet pictured above is taking part in a December display in Israel), saying the attack would be a breach of international law.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:16:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Egypt political factions condemn violence, urge dialogue | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

Egypt's rival political factions have uniformly condemned the violence that has killed dozens over the past week. The groups pledged their support for a national dialogue to resolve the country's political crisis.

Egypt's top Muslim scholar, Grand Imam Ahmed al-Tayyeb, chaired talks between the factions Thursday at the headquarters of Al-Azhar University in Cairo, Sunni Islam's highest seat of learning. Present at the talks were liberal opposition heads, Islamists, youth groups, independents and church members.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:19:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
New York Times reports China hacked their computer system | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

The New York Times has reported that their computer systems were repeatedly attacked by Chinese hackers. The US newspaper linked the hacking to its investigation into Chinese Prime Minister Wen Jiabao's family wealth.

The US daily paper the New York Times on Thursday said hackers, possibly connected to China's military, stole their reporters' email passwords, alleging it was linked to an earlier feature article exploring Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao's amassed wealth.

The computer security firm Mandiant, which was hired to investigate and block the breach, found that the attacks used strategies similar to ones used in previous hacking incidents traced to China, the New York Times report said.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:20:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
New York Times hacking revelations shed new light on China cybercrime | Media | guardian.co.uk

Revelations that China apparently targeted the New York Times in a campaign of cyber-espionage have cast a rare spotlight on attempts by Beijing to crack down on any criticism of its ruling elite.

The move, which was detected and then monitored by the Times's digital staff, is believed to have been linked to the newspaper's hard-hitting October exposé on the vast wealth accumulated by the family of leading communist and outgoing president Wen Jiabao.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:33:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The move, which was detected and then monitored by the Times's digital staff, is believed to have been linked to the newspaper's hard-hitting October exposé on the vast wealth accumulated by the family of leading communist and outgoing premier Wen Jiabao.

I find that rather hard to believe.

Pentagon's new massive expansion of 'cyber-security' unit is about everything except defense | Glenn Greenwald | Comment is free | guardian.co.uk

Wildly exaggerated cyber-threats are the pretext for this control, the "mushroom cloud" and the Tonkin Gulf fiction of cyber-warfare. As Singel aptly put it: "the only war going on is one for the soul of the internet." That's the vital context for understanding this massive expansion of Pentagon and NSA consolidated control over cyber programs.



Von überall könnte das Volk, Urbrut alles Undemokratischen, Zelle des Terrors, über die gewählten Hüter von Wachstum und Wohlstand® kommen. - flatter
by generic on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 09:36:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And it's becoming A Thing.

Chinese Hacking of US Media Becoming a "Wide-Spread Phenomenon":

Computer systems operated by The Wall Street Journal have been penetrated by Chinese hackers for the apparent purpose of monitoring the publication's coverage of China, the newspaper reported Thursday.

& blah-dee-blah-blah

Lot that could be going on.  The first is the Chinese are actually hacking into US (and probably other) media computers.  The second is somebody is spreading dis-information - a standard espionage and counter-espionage activity - for some unknown reason(s.)  Third is the WSJ & etc. are climbing on a pop culture bandwagon.  Fourth: some mixture of the above.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 01:05:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Bundestag extends German military mission in Afghanistan | News | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

German parliamentarians have overwhelmingly approved a 13-month extension to the Bundeswehr's activities in Afghanistan. The mission is being gradually downsized, and is currently due to end by 2015.

The extension of the Bundeswehr's mission in Afghanistan, which requires regular parliamentary approval under German law, was passed by a clear majority on Thursday in Berlin.

At the Bundestag lower house of parliament, 435 politicians voted in favor, 111 opposed and 39 abstained.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:21:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mali eyes post-conflict elections | Africa | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

Over the last three weeks, France has helped Malian government forces halt an Islamist rebel advance and recapture their urban strongholds. Mali is now under pressure to renew its democratic credentials.

Yehia Ag Mohmed Ali finds it difficult to contain his impatience. "We can't wait until the war is over before we start preparing for the next elections. We've already started," he said. Appointed minister for tourism in the interim cabinet of Prime Minister Diango Cissoko, Yehia Ag Mohmed Ali believes there is no time to be lost. Progress must be made at the political level, parallel to the military intervention, he insisted.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:23:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A coffee between enemies | World | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

The Munich Security Conference has been an annual fixture in the calendar of global decision-makers for the past 50 years. Once again, this year promises a heady mix of urgent issues and high-profile speakers.

The Munich Security Conference was founded in 1963, in the midst of the Cold War, as a strategy meeting for NATO countries engaged in the East-West conflict. Since then, it has undergone numerous transformations.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:23:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Obama's foreign policy and the loyal opposition | Transatlantic Voices | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

The conventional wisdom after the election is that there was little light between President Obama and his Republican challenger Mitt Romney on foreign policy, but that conclusion would be incorrect writes Henry R. Nau.

The foreign policies of Obama and Romney, or what is now the loyal opposition, could not be wider apart. Obama's foreign policy is inordinately piecemeal, even picayune. It lacks a vision that draws connections between specific issues, such as terrorism, and broader American interests to protect and promote freedom. The loyal opposition, by contrast connects the dots between terrorism and authoritarian challenges to American and global freedom. 

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:25:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
hahahahahahahahha

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:03:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Now, now.
"If we don't like them: keep them out, lock them up, kill them all" is actually pretty consistent.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:27:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Israel must withdraw all settlers or face ICC, says UN report:
Israel must withdraw all settlers from the West Bank or potentially face a case at the international criminal court (ICC) for serious violations of international law, says a report by a United Nations agency that was immediately dismissed in Jerusalem as "counterproductive and unfortunate"


"Beware of the man who does not talk, and the dog that does not bark." Cheyenne
by maracatu on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 06:48:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
On Immigration, GOP Elites Tell Their Base to Pound Sand
The fight over immigration reform is a fascinating legislative drama
[...]
The Republican party's strategic decision thus far has been to avoid any rethinking of its economic program at all, and instead try to woo Latino voters by supporting immigration reform. This is a choice that, whatever its merits, makes lots of sense to Republican elites and very little sense to Republican voters
[...]
The party's obsession with tax cuts for the rich is driven entirely by its donor class and Washington leaders.
[...]
they are disposing of something their voters care about a lot, while holding onto something the voters would be happy to let go.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:54:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:14:51 PM EST
Canada's First Nations fight for their heritage | Globalization | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

A vocal indigenous movement has burst onto the Canadian political scene. "Idle No More" demands recognition of the land rights of Canada's First Nations peoples and improved living conditions on their reserves.

Victoria Island lies in the Ottawa River, at the foot of the Chaudiere Falls. The falls were dammed two centuries ago to power a sawmill. As the lumber trade blossomed, it transformed Ottawa into the capital of a new nation, Canada. The city's name comes from the Algonquin First Nations word adawe, meaning "to trade."

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:27:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
China's smog continues to wreak havoc - video | World news | guardian.co.uk
The haze which has consumed much of China for weeks continues to cause major disruption to civilians. A 40-car pile-up in the northern Tianjin Municipality caused major delays, with 100 more cars being abandoned on the highway. Air pollution, which has reached 'hazardous' levels, has also caused health concerns and airport delays
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:36:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
that's the growth that europe should aspire to!
breathing is a luxury they'll be able to afford later, when they've lifted themselves out of poverty...


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:29:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hey, if oxygen sales takes off think of the potential GDP increase!

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 09:02:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tokyo and Beijing are the cities noted as having "air stations". The only one that gets a writeup is in Toronto.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 10:31:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Carbon tax v cap-and-trade: which is better? | Environment | guardian.co.uk
Economists argue that, if the market is left to operate freely, greenhouse gas emissions will be excessive, since there is insufficient incentive for firms and households to reduce emissions. As such, they recommend applying the polluter pays principle and placing a price on carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. This can be implemented either through a carbon tax (known as a price instrument) or a cap-and-trade scheme (a so-called quantity instrument).
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:37:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Burger King reveals its burgers were contaminated in horsemeat scandal | Business | The Guardian

Burger King has revealed that some of its burgers were contaminated in the horsemeat scare, as the tainted food crisis threatened to undermine the confidence of consumers, and major retailers tried to protect their reputations.

The fast food company, whose products were not tested in the food standards checks by Irish authorities that sparked the furore earlier this month, moved production from the Silvercrest plant in Ireland to Germany and Italy as a precaution. On Thursday night it said test results at the plant revealed "very small trace levels" of horse DNA in its products, but burgers taken from restaurants had tested negative.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:38:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well, on the rare occasions when I have a burger, it's a cheeseburger. I don't specify the meat

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:05:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Once waited 15 minutes because I said "no cheese".

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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:28:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Couldn't the horse DNA have shown up if they used horse milk for the cheese?
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 10:44:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Theoretically perhaps. Horse milk is expensive, and I guess that none of it has been used for the cheese of cheap burgers.
by Katrin on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:00:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Horse milk is expensive", as I once found out (and not very nice. I'm sure afew WoB & Heinze are still amused at the memory of my reaction

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:06:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yup.

A whinny of indignation and pour the stuff down the drain. Pretty much.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:25:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Holly: Lasts longer than any other type of milk, dog's milk.
Lister: Why?
Holly: No bugger 'll drink it.

-Red Dwarf, Queeg.

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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:57:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Kryten", not "Queeg".

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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:58:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I see you're hardcore.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:10:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, just old.

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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:51:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Anything like goat's?


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 11:59:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If you think of got's milk as a beer, then mare's milk is like a gueze beer, acid, rancid and definitely an acquired taste

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:29:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thus the territorial expansion of the Mongolian Hordes, desperately seeking a lunch that wouldn't cause them to lose their breakfast.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 01:12:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Plan Bee: Brussels pitches two-year pesticide ban | EurActiv

"We are requesting that member states suspend for two years the use of these [neonicitonoid] pesticides on seeds, granular atom sprays and for crops that attract bees - sunflower, maize, rape and cotton," Frédéric Vincent, a spokesman for the EU health commissioner, Tonio Borg, told a press conference on Thursday (31 January).

The EU's proposals are based on an EFSA finding that the three seed-coating treatments - clothianidin, imidacloprid and thiamethoxam - could potentially harm bees where they are attracted to crops, or exposed to pesticide dust or guttation fluid.

>> Read: Common pesticides a threat to bees, EU watchdog says

Around 16% of Europe's honeybee colonies disappeared between 1985 and 2005 - with greater losses recorded in England, the Czech Republic, Germany and Sweden - according to the EU-funded Status and Trends of European Pollinators (STEP) project.

Insects such as honey bees and wild bees help pollinate around 84% of Europe's 264 crop species and 4,000 vegetable varieties, contributing an estimated €22 billion to the EU's economy, STEP says.



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:03:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:15:14 PM EST
Eyewitness accounts shed light on Stalingrad | German history | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

Seventy years after the battle of Stalingrad, a historian has published long-forgotten eye-witness accounts by Red Army soldiers and civilians. The sources open up a new perspective on the events of winter 1942/43.

In a long chain, starving and ragged men departed from Stalingrad, the metropolis on the Volga. The German soldiers were watched over by armed Red Army troops, though they were too weak to flee. Their eyes were empty; they could barely stand.

These images from the first few days of February 1943 are burned into the German collective consciousness. National Socialist propaganda painted the defeat as a great act of self-sacrifice.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:24:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Only 6,000 of the over 100,000 prisoners taken, ever saw germany again.

My parents attitude is, given what the nazis did to the russians on the way in, they aren't prepared to criticize if the russians got their own back

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:08:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The "German Fawlty Towers" had a Russian Manuel called Igor. Goodness knows why it wasn't picked up for series.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:38:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Colombia's middle class powered by loans | Globalization | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

Colombia's economy has improved over the past two decades, but the new middle class has only profited to a limited extent. Their social and economic situation is insecure.

Colombia's middle class is growing. The World Bank estimates that the percentage of Columbians who count themselves middle class has risen to 28 from 15 percent over the past 10 years.

A study on social mobility in Colombia led by Alejandro Gaviria, former dean of the economics department at the University of the Andes in Bogota, found that around two million Colombian households moved out of poverty and into the middle class over the past decade, doubling the size of the middle class to 30 percent of the population.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:25:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is that a canary in your trousers or... ? | Sci-Tech | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

A new Australian study suggests that erectile dysfunction can indicate underlying cardiovascular problems. Researchers say the penis is an early warning system - like "the canary in a coal mine."

While earlier studies suggested connections between severe erectile dysfunction and heart attacks and strokes, new research conducted by scientists in Australia and published in the journal "PLOS Medicine" is the first to show links with mild moderately severe erection problems. DW spoke to the study's lead author, professor Emily Banks of the Australian National University, about investigating the links between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:26:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:15:41 PM EST
David Beckham returns to Europe with a move to PSG | Sports | DW.DE | 31.01.2013

David Beckham has joined Paris St. Germain. The 37-year-old, who will donate his salary to charity, signed a five-month contract for the Qatari-owned French club in the latest stop of a long and storied career.

PSG unveiled Beckham Thursday at a press conference in the French capital. Rumors about the English superstar's next destination began swirling the moment he announced he was leaving the Los Angeles Galaxy in late November, a week before the MLS Cup Final.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 05:20:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In Wales:
PSG unveiled Beckham

Actually a plastic statue.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 02:41:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
David Beckham returns to Europe with a move to PSG | Sports | DW.DE | 31.01.2013
"I chose Paris because what they're trying to do," said Beckham, at his introductory press conference

An articulate plastic statue at that.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 05:39:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If David is a plastic statue, what is Victoria?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 05:41:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 05:55:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Deflated?


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:35:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
For Sven:

Stefan Kudelski, Nagra Inventor, Dies at 83


The bigger breakthrough came seven years later, when Mr. Kudelski introduced a high-quality tape recorder that could synchronize sound with the frames on a reel of film. Mr. Kudelski's 1958 recorder, the Nagra III, weighed about 14 pounds and freed a new generation of filmmakers from the conventions and high cost of studio production.

Along with the newly developed portable 16-millimeter camera, the Nagra recorder became an essential tool for the on-location, often improvisational techniques of New Wave directors like François Truffaut and Jean-Luc Godard, and American documentarians like D. A. Pennebaker, who used the Nagra to record the 1965 Bob Dylan tour featured in his classic film "Don't Look Back," released in 1967.



"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 04:07:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A beautifully engineered audio workhorse by a guy high up in my movie pantheon, along with André Coutant.

A couple of audio studios in Helsinki have historic analogue equipment  on display. I always have to touch any Nagra - very tactile.

I am, according to the chief engineer at one studio, the only person who recognizes the 2 metre high 16mm mag perf recorder in one corner of their lobby.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 06:09:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
old skool

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:10:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Makes me wonder what happened to the tens of thousands of miles of mag recording tape.  Quietly disintegrating in the bowels of RCA, EMI, & etc.?

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 01:17:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I presume that there are many movies for which the neg cut and mag soundtracks have been retained, but I guess for the ones with income potential still, the sound tracks have been digitized. Storing data files is a helluva lot cheaper than cans on shelves.

If you include all developed negative, intermediates, prints and all the soundtracks plus various mixdown levels, then a couple of meters of 2 m high shelf space might suffice.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 01:41:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
McKinsey Global Institute says a $600 disk drive can store all of the world's music, roughly 5 terabytes worth.  With cheap petrabyte hard drives lurking on the horizon it's going to be possible to hold all the movies ever made in a meter square box.

With theaters slowly moving to digital screenings I be thinking the distributors are going to have a hard time keeping their profit margins up.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 02:13:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I just saw some 2TB disks at Saturn in Berlin today for around 100 Euros. McKinsey is a bit out of date.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 03:42:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Analysis was written in the first part of 2011 so ... yeah.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:14:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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