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Monday Open Thread

by Fran Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 01:48:55 PM EST

It's open!


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Looks like a slow day here.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 01:49:45 PM EST
It's been slow since xmas. I'm not sure the FP presentation helps, but I'm not an expert

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 01:51:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Behaviourly it hasn't really changed anything. The Scoop format (not that I'm an expert) was not designed to support the sort of cooperative / collaborative project tools that could be called 'action' or verb tools. Scoop is mainly about noun tools.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 04:24:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What I have always hoped for, and attempted to influence, in ET, is for it to become a forum in which perceptualists and scientists (in itself perceptually biased, sorry),  could uniquely share across the Duality ;-)


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 04:36:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Are you sure it's not a fractal:

(That's a 1.3D, BTW.)

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 04:48:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not really sure of how you get from an on/off landscape to a fractal landscape - or, indeed, if the concept of landscape is relevant.

What the rule seems to me to be, is that organic shapes are cuter than geometric. Cuter ensures hormonic reinforcement.

What I would like to know is: yes, I can understand the geometric tracery of the lines that connect points in XYZ, but are these colours generated by the data or by some arbitrary human overlay?

I was about to say: "there are few emotionally valuable geometric concepts in two dimensions." But that's when I understood the paradox.

The visual example you produce is, in fact, fine embroidery on black velvet - known from the traditional clothing of the Finnish roma.  Now  THAT'S pretty cosmic. <in my mind>

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 05:17:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 05:55:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not really sure of how you get from an on/off landscape to a fractal landscape

Here you go.  :-)

are these colours generated by the data or by some arbitrary human overlay?

Connecting the points along x,y comes from the data but is colored according to differing criteria as well as depending on the fractal.  A Mandelbrot Set is usually colored according to how fast the point escapes from the Set.  Black means it doesn't, red usually means very quickly (IIRC.)  Have to read the description to see what the colors represent.

few emotionally valuable geometric concepts in two dimensions

Depends on the brain doing the viewing, I suppose.  I find the Lorenz Butterfly:

very "emotionally valuable," in the sense it makes sense - to me - of some things it's hard to make sense of, e.g., bounded iterative infinities.  

A Period Three Implies Chaos graph:

is also emotionally satisfying, although the Why? is harder to get across in a blog comment.  Mostly it's to do with 'grokking' a dynamic system's sensitivity to initial conditions which may be "just the way it is" or how the system can bifurcate depending on who, how, with what, and when it is measured.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 06:01:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In reply:

(youtube qySO5kYvHlM))

How James Page remains alive I shall never know. He's made some outrageous all-in bets. It is ironical that the same infrastructural dynamics can apply to rock and roll and to global politics.

I think we get the people we deserve. It's homeostasis in action.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 06:25:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]

sorry.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 06:26:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't see how it's "ironical."  Rock and Roll and global politics are both human systems and activities and, thus, follow the Laws of human systems and activities.

(Not that I know much about R&R.  When my peers were listening to Led Zeppelin, etc., I was listening to Mozart, etc.)  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 06:43:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Can 'ironical' be used ironically?

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 13th, 2013 at 04:35:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hello. Nothing to report, I've been asleep all day

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 01:50:21 PM EST
Hope sleeping helped and you are doing better.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 01:52:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sadly, I'm sleeping to avoid a massive cramp in my diaphragm that just won't go away. It feels like somebody stabbed me in the side

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 02:15:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
i had that once. i had to ask a strapping masseuse to lean into it with all her upper body weight using her elbow and holding it there. it released after a few minutes.

stay warm and dry!

it is raining so hard here... expecting nano noah any time.

and here's another stowaway clambering onboard

(1) Facebook


Today, the Pope announced his resignation. To commemorate the occasion here is Uroplatus phantasticus, the Satanic Leaf Tailed Gecko.


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 02:31:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OMG, I can't imagine that. It hurts so much to do anything, even touching it is painful, so having someone do that would be agony beyond imagining

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 02:36:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If it persists see a doctor. It could be a bad case of heartburn but the worst case that springs to my mind is a haital hernia, which can be fatal. I knew someone who almost died. He thought he was having a heart attack. The link may help you sort out things.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 at 01:43:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
no worries, it's only slightly sore this morning. which obviously left a window of opportunity for a frozen shoulder which is excruciatingly painful. If it ain't one thing it's another.

So far 2013 is not my year

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 at 06:14:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The joys of aging.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 at 10:21:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sorry to hear that. Could it be that you are breathing rather shallow? That could tighten the diaphram - so trying some deep breathing into the belly, but gently, could help.

Anyway, hope you get better soon.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 03:24:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
magnesium  is great for cramps.  they should have dissolvable tablets in your pharmacy.
by stevesim on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 03:30:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So what's the connection between magnesium and muscle cramps? Think of a key and a lock. Normally stored in muscle and bone, magnesium acts like a key that unlocks muscle cells, allowing potassium and calcium to move in and out when needed as a muscle does its job.
Without adequate levels of any of these three nutrients, the muscle becomes irritable, says Dr. McLean. "It's a crude analogy, but to keep the muscle cell adequately healthy and alive, you need to get potassium into the cell, and you need to have magnesium to open up the door to let the potassium in," he explains.
Make no mistake: Both potassium and calcium are also vital to this process. It's just that the body generally has adequate amounts of these two electrolytes on hand, says Dr. Brilla. If the body is going to get low on any electrolyte, it is most likely to be magnesium, she says. Doctors have long marveled at magnesium's powerful relaxant effect on muscles. In massive intravenous doses, this mineral is the preferred treatment for stopping premature labor contractions and a dangerous condition called preeclampsia, which causes extreme swelling and high blood pressure in pregnant women. (Note: Pregnant women should not take any supplement without first discussing it with their doctors.)
Before recommending magnesium supplements to ease muscle cramps, Dr. McLean does a blood test to determine an individual's blood magnesium level, to make sure that it is not unexpectedly high. If the blood level is low or even normal, then body magnesium stores may be low. Unfortunately, a normal blood level does not ensure that body magnesium stores are adequate.
Based on the results of the tests as well as the person's muscle cramp symptoms, Dr. McLean usually recommends taking one 400-milligram magnesium capsule two or three times a day. "I wouldn't go higher than that, because too much magnesium can cause you to develop diarrhea," he says. (Magnesium salt is the ingredient that makes Phillips' Milk of Magnesia, a popular bowel cleanser, do its job.)
But be careful: If you have kidney problems, taking magnesium supplements may make you accumulate the mineral too quickly, which could be toxic, says Dr. McLean. If you have kidney or heart problems, you should check with your doctor before taking magnesium supplements. Some people taking magnesium may get relief from leg cramps right away, but a long-standing deficiency can take weeks to overcome with supplements, says Dr. Brilla. "We like to recommend supplementing for four weeks," she says. "That's how long we feel it takes before we have some kind of measurable outcome."

Magnesium - a natural remedy for muscle cramps
Canadian doctors have found that magnesium supplements can alleviate muscle cramps. In severe cases, magnesium has been provided intravenously and this has led to relief of symptoms within 24 hours. Many cases of muscle cramps are caused by low concentrations of magnesium in the blood which can be the reason why it helps is be due to diuretic medications or strenuous exercise. When taken orally, it seems that magnesium glucoheptonate or magnesium gluconate work best.

http://www.mg12.info/articles/cramps.html

by stevesim on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 03:37:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We've had a few inches of snow, I ain't going anywhere and my Mum has her own issues to deal with. A pharmacy trip is probably out till weds

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 03:46:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]

  http://www.democracynow.org/2013/2/11/michael_moore_chris_hedges_on_challenging

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 02:34:39 PM EST
We got about 10 cm of snow here in Colorado Springs last night. Nothing to compare with the east coast, but it's the first significant moisture here for months and months. So far today:

  • Guy across the street carefully cleared off his sidewalk, as required by regulation, but left his driveway covered. It will probably all melt tomorrow anyway but it's good to see such attention paid to the law. Unlike the rest of the neighbors.
  • Lady clearing her car off in the cold; it's well below freezing and she had on a sweatshirt, a short skirt, and patterned tights, with very fashionable boots. Probably a transplant from the south; I haven't met her yet.
  • Troop of high school kids going by in their shirtsleeves. Have not see anybody in shorts today, but it won't surprise me if I do; 17 year olds seem to be impervious to the cold.
  • Homeless guy trying to ride his bike through the snow with some difficulty. Not clear whether he would have been doing much better if the roadway were dry.
  • No longboards out today. That seems to have become the preferred method of transportation for about half the people in this town.
by asdf on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 02:50:22 PM EST
I'm hoping everyone who has the flu (that's you, too, DoDo... afew told me) will get over it soon. We've escaped it so far this year, but I'm sure I'll come back from the USA with it in March. Maybe I'll wear a facemask and plastic gloves on the plane.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 03:47:46 PM EST
Recent reports indicate that it may be on the wane.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 at 01:45:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks! Here I told myself. It's not the flu actually, but some other respiratory tract virus infection. On Monday the doctor warned me that I shouldn't expect the end of it before next Monday, and he made two days without fever the condition. I was incredulous, but he was on to something: on the fifth sday my fever still goes up and down in a roller-coaster (right now it's low but last night was awful again). So despite sitting at home, my brain capacity for ET posts is limited :-/

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Feb 13th, 2013 at 07:37:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There seem to be a couple of really mean ones pottering about. We've escaped here so far - which is as well since we're drowning in work (but not the concomitant money) - but I'm sure it'll get here. Lots of people down for extended periods with hard to shake illnesses.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Feb 13th, 2013 at 07:49:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]

The picture is from this link - didn't read it, but liked the picture - which apparently was taken tonight.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 04:26:23 PM EST
Oopps, this is the link:

Pope Benedict XVI resigns: First Pontiff in 600 years to stand down because he 'no longer has strength to carry on' | Mail Online

The Catholic church was thrown into turmoil today after Pope Benedict XVI made the shock decision to quit the papacy because of his deteriorating health.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 04:28:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I read on German twitter that they are making fun of the Pope's resignation by saying that he got caught plagiarizing too...  like the Education Minister who resigned earlier this week.
by stevesim on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 04:56:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The BBC flew its main presenter to Rome, so that meant that there was him, the vatican correspondent, the rome correspondent, the ex-vatican correspondent all vying for screen time.

The conversation seems to go;
MC: I'm shocked, what about you?
VC : I'm shocked
x-VC : I'm shocked
RC : I'm shocked too
MC and here's some random sampling of reaction across rome

VP1 I'm shocked
VP2 I'm so shocked
VP3 The Pope. I'm shocked

There ya go folks, that's yer licence fee for ya

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 05:49:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Was this before or after the Pope announced his retirement? Amazing synchronicity.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 12th, 2013 at 01:47:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by stevesim on Mon Feb 11th, 2013 at 05:27:13 PM EST
Do like the French language. It even makes "wind turbine" sound pretty.

(Oh, and 'Dong Energy'? How come the Danes get away with that, but we cannot sell 'Pricks cookies/biscuits' abroad?)


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Wed Feb 13th, 2013 at 07:59:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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