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Tuesday Open Thread

by Fran Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 09:57:42 AM EST

Another one of those Open Threads!


Display:
Here's a comment, at least!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 10:24:46 AM EST
Sat up way too late last night learning preliminaries I need to know to learn about the scientific consensus in molecular biology in 2013.  

Been a ton of advances since I last poked my nose into the field.  One such is the finding that a transcription factor can set-off a cascade across gene networks, not just a gene, not just a gene network.  Another is they are really getting a handle on the mechanisms of epigenetics.  And they've found "jumping genes" in humans during neural (!) development in gestation.  (!)

Whoa.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 12:46:55 PM EST
Two things flow from this.

  1.  If anybody starts going all Excluded Middle on you when discussing Biology tell 'em to take a hike.  

  2.  I would like to Shout Out to all my former profs at the University of (redacted.)  I was right.  You were wrong.

neener, neener, neener.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 12:52:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We'll have to ask for a primer diary on it from you then :)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 03:02:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
First, I have learn what I'm talking about.

Second, I have to transmogrify the knowledge into something suitable for a blog post.

Third, I have to have the time to write it.

HAHAAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

(I said a funny.)

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 04:24:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's never been an impediment to me.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 03:03:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
any of them?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 03:06:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Second, there has to be an easy pun.
Third, well that's a thing.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 03:11:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Our office computers are being replaced, and the new ones come with Windows 7 (not yet 8). I'm having a hell of a time trying to customize it (just what does Bill have against customization?). For example, I don't like the Show Desktop at the right end of the taskbar at all, had to find a hack to add the Windows XP icon on the left.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 01:36:03 PM EST
My sympathies. Since I went to Windows 7 all of the usual file search, etc., seem more difficult and, worst of all, I have yet to obtain drivers for my old Brother lazer printer/multifunction machines. I'm beginning to think that the best approach might be to hook up the old XP machine as a printer server. Things were working just fine in XP. Had Microsoft not announced they were no longer maintaining XP I would never have changed - which is why they did it.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 01:50:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Customisability is usually all there on Windows machines, it's just a question of finding it. However because it's all there, your employer can reset everything to standard settings when you log in.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 03:07:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Performance-wise, Windows 7 is a disaster, and so is Office 2010.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 02:23:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But Windows 8 will fix everything!  Although some UnSerious© scalawags are aren't as thrilled.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 02:55:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No No No, & is a good one, according to the Alternate Windows versions rule, 8 is bound to be a dog

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 03:04:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought that was Seven, coming after Vista...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 03:19:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Vista was a dog, 7 was supposed to be good, and 8 is supposed to be a dog again.

I've used them all, and they're all garbage.  Resource hogs with confusing UIs.  I know XP isn't the most modern-looking OS on Earth.  It looks like the design was stolen out of a PlaySkool catalog.  But Microsoft sucks at trying to do the flashy Apple thing.

Windows 8 ideas could be good by the time they get to Windows 11.  Unfortunately for Microsoft, there won't be many to sell to by that point, judging by trends in the PC market.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 05:38:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't care what it looks like, am holding on to XP.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:39:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
XP was the last one.
95 was fine.

And, oh, 3.11 was the first usable version.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 03:47:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Isn't 7 just Vista SP1?


-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 06:37:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The scariest thing about Windows 8 is that it looks like Microsoft recycled the user interface of an XBox games console for use in mobile phones, tablets and computers.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 04:33:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's Nielsen:
One of the worst aspects of Windows 8 for power users is that the product's very name has become a misnomer. "Windows" no longer supports multiple windows on the screen. Win8 does have an option to temporarily show a second area in a small part of the screen, but none of our test users were able to make this work. Also, the main UI restricts users to a single window, so the product ought to be renamed "Microsoft Window."

(Haven't tried it myself.)

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 06:40:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm getting a Mac!

(just kidding... no, this means finally installing some sort of linnucks for home use.)

But seriously. No enterprise could possibly adopt that.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 07:30:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Same here. Ooh, or a BSD. But which one?

(14 years ago. Ye gods, I'm getting old. Might as well be referencing Peanuts or Garfield.)

(I do understand people who like mac. It's just not for me - like Tarantino and the general public and marmite.)

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 08:02:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Like a mobile phone.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 08:38:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think that's it.

MS believe they have finally cracked a good user interface for mobile devices (after, what, 15 or 20 years of flops?). They messed that up by making teh stoopid strategic choice of adopting that same interface for all their operating systems...

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 08:53:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
So, is Microsoft getting out of the PC business?

Will there be a PC business?

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 09:00:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There'll be a need for standard desktops with a standard OS.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 09:23:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think there will be, but Jobs's truck analogy is probably the right one: they're for work use. The era of consumer PCs/Laptops is dying. For most light weight computing tasks a keyboard isn't necessary (as opposed to us old people and what we're used to), most people seem to use their computers in single window mode anyway and they don't do anything heavier duty than browsing the web.

The next question is to what extent business PCs can be displaced by tablets with the next generation or two of voice recognition: dictation was displaced relatively recently by the desktop PC and could easily return again. Will (say) A4 size tablets become the basic desktop machine?

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 09:38:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
True. Most people don't want a computer (or ever did.) They want to do certain things that computers allow them to do.

The same holds for cars. I don't want a car. I want to get from A to B without sitting next to hoi polloi.

The microwave is terrible for cooking but does one thing well that the standard "proper cooking" options don't do. AGA anyone? That's not an appliance, it's a lifestyle. (And we're back to Jobs.)

-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 10:13:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hah. And see what he says about the live tiles.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 09:41:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just saw what Nielsen says about "animation and sound effects" on the web.  (Table near the bottom. Basically "don't do it if your target audience is older than 12".)


-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 11:24:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I advise people not to customize any Microsoft product, for two reasons.

First, as soon as you start changing things around from the default, you are into untested-software-configuration-cloud-cuckoo-land. When you start having memory management problems because you moved an application to the toolbar, don't come crying to me.

Second, Windows is designed to forget your settings. The next time there is an upgrade to IE or Office, Windows is going to start acting funny because you screwed around with the settings.

Use The Defaults For Everything.

by asdf on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 09:49:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We are looking forward to the weather tomorrow. Starting about 11:00 AM we will have light snow; later the temperature rises and we will have a mix of rain and snow through the late afternoon and evening. Then, after midnight through 7 AM comes the ever popular light freezing rain - for 7 hours. returning in the afternoon possibly. I am sincerely hoping that this turns out to be a worst case forecast. But I will be stocking up on some foods and bringing in some firewood. Just in case. It would be worth it to me to pay an extra few dollars a month on my power bill to have the lines buried. Then we would be far less vulnerable. As it is an ice storm or, even, a single drunk in a car can take out power for entire neighborhoods. We have local hydro generation from two dams, so we should be less vulnerable to power loss from high tension lines as we are net exporters of electricity.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 02:00:15 PM EST
Power lines are mostly buried in primitive west Yurp.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 03:31:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They are buried in the development that starts just a block south of our place, but only for that development. Here that sort of thing is developer option. They should not have the option not to bury, they reliability would greatly improve. I'll take 'primitive' over 'wild west' libertarian any day.  

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 04:29:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I live in an old section of town where the wires are strung around almost as randomly as in those pictures of India. I would bet that some of the infrastructure feeding my house was put in at the turn of the century when they first wired the city...
by asdf on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 10:05:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Buried for most of the population, sure. But not for most of the territory.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 03:58:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Had I remained in the USA, I'd have invested in a large generator operated off the natural gas system. But when my husband told me that, growing up in Germany, he didn't remember more than one or two power failures in his life up to age 33, that definitely factored into the decision to move on (along with the health care... always the health care.)

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 04:56:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My Krankenkasse (health care) today decided to pay all of the new teeth surgery, above and beyond the call of duty and requirement, and left a few hundred EUR over for some extras. I'm still not sure i believe this, but the official documents are already signed, so it might be true.

this is not a regular occurrence in 'Schland, but it must be because i'm so sweet and powerful. /snark i'm really thankful...

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 05:41:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They try to pay out a bit of the excess money
they accumulated in the last 1-2 years 8-}

7 years to go !
by pi (etrib@opsec.eu) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 04:18:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They accumulated this money because they cut so many treatments. Now they can reduce their intakes until they will have a deficit again, which will force them to cut the treatments they pay... A good moment to have teeth surgery.
by Katrin on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 05:16:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow. Having just had two implants, two root canals and a crown, I'm champing at the bit to see what they do for me. But I'm not charming, and I have temperamental teeth.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 12:11:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wife of Bath:
I'm champing at the bit

ouch ouch ouch!


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 01:28:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The natural gas version wasn't an option for me during the '09 ice storm, but it is a very good solution. Gas lines are much more resilient than above ground electric lines. The gasoline generator is a pain. I have to keep gasoline through the storm season and then I use it for my lawn tractor all summer. There is an additive that keeps it from deteriorating. I suspect that it mostly adds a layer to the top that inhibits the loss of the lighter components of the gasoline to evaporation.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 08:11:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's what we had in Austin, and Heinz also found it a pain to have to shuffle the gasoline.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher
by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 12:12:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Just saw that the IPR lobby in Sweden has sent a threatening letter to the Swedish Pirate Party regarding its hosting of the new and changed Pirate Bay (ie the technical solution is sligthly changed to comply with the sentences against the former Pirate Bay crew). I think the chance for Pirate election successes in 2014 (EP, local, regional and national elections) just jumped up quite a bit.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!
by A swedish kind of death on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 02:24:04 PM EST
Vote like a Victual Brother Likedeeler pirate?

From what I can tell, from the scraps of information I've gotten, is the Pirate Party is as embedded in the neo-liberal TINA CW as everybody else.  I'm all for shaking-up The System.  I'd like it to be a real shake-up and not "meet the new folks, same as the old folks."

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 02:50:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Pirates are mostly a reaction to IPR creep and internet control. I see the main group as a technical class that depends on internet and computers as means of production. This has in a natural way married with freedom of speech, transparency and rule-of-law activism (in the wake of Bush, Guantanamo and renditions). The demand for transparency leads to a demand for parliamentary or dircet democratic power - in the EU the demand for more power to the parliaments (EP and national) which would come from the Council and executives. That is the core and that is where the political capital will be spent.

Other then that the Pirates will to the extent it is demanded or judged important hold other opinions. These will at this stage reflect the common wisdom of the core group, so nothing revolutionary is to be expected. Though according to Veblen, MMT should appeal to this group.

In terms of 19th century politics the Pirates are liberals, not socialists. But in 19th century politics liberals and socialists are natural allies.

A vote for PES is a vote for EPP! A vote for EPP is a vote for PES! Support the coalition, vote EPP-PES in 2009!

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 04:26:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The main parties are increasingly indistinguishable, and utterly in league with the media. They all want to stay in power and don't care about "ideas". (Cf UK politics post the Blair revolution/innovation.)

The SD are responsive to their voters. Some say they are not really extremely right-wing, they are more natural social democratic voters fed up with the industrial boom of the 60's being over and a confusing new world. (Think Tea Party grass roots: "I've worked hard. Stuff used to work. Now it doesn't. Someone fix it so we can go back the way it was.") I don't have enough data to comment. Will say that voting SD isn't likely to solve anything: regardless of whether they are Nazis in sheep's clothing or not, no other party will work with them.

The Pirates may appear confused on many issues, but they are the only ones even discussing right to privacy and freedom of speech.
If every other party is going to go ahead with tax tinkering, male bashing and suppressing "wrong speech" as ways of getting votes, then the Pirates seem like the only alternative. No change on most issues, at least discussion on some.


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 07:08:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by Bernard on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 04:13:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Good news, as the Pirates are self-destructing in 'Schland.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anaïs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 05:44:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Great Leap Forward: How To Teach Money: Presentation at UNAM (L. Randall Wray, February 18th, 2013)
As I previously announced, a 2 day conference begins today at UNAM in Mexico City:

http://www.economonitor.com/lrwray/2013/01/30/upcoming-conference-at-unam-in-mexico-city/

I'm giving 3 talks. I thought those interested in MMT might want to view the presentation slides.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 02:50:30 PM EST
European Commission Press Release: Speech: Ten Years on, where is the Euro headed? The economic and political future of the European Union (Olli REHN, 19 February 2013)

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 04:49:49 PM EST
(1) Long Reads | Tumblr

Augmentation becomes a way of life. Virtual and real are no longer seen as a dichotomy. Everything has a computer on board, everything is connected wirelessly. Mindgoo not only controls physical processes, but also abstract ones over the web. It mines financial data for patterns and organizes warehouse deliveries to be more efficient. People no longer tie their identities most closely to their bodies, but rather to the web of information that constantly surounds them. They can throw their awareness across the world or into abstract spaces.

Some countries clamp down on this, and new technofascist states pop up, using this connection to exert top-down control of their populace. Other areas completely decentralize, forming ad-hoc networks of information and resources. The technofascist states ruthlessly expand in order to secure resources, but the computing load placed on the network of mindgoo and augmented overlords who control the whole mess becomes too much as the network grows too complicated. It is not external democracy but internal technological limits that sends asunder the newest wave of totalitarianism as its networks fragment and violently collapse inwards against their most powerful nodes.

As the human mind becomes more abstract and less aware of the physical world, its physical footprint doesn't shrink. People are still just as large and made of meat. So are the cows that feed them. Computers are still constructed of silicon and gold. And oil and coal plants still power them while spewing carbon into the sky. Storms become worse and worse on the coasts. The weather inland varies between scorching hot in the summer to freezing cold in the winter. Food production stagnates as the weather makes farming less efficient by percentage points a year while the ocean slowly is drained of readily edible fish.




"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 08:01:12 PM EST
Barack Obama Is The First Cyber War President, But A President Can't Win A Cyber War | Fast Company
Howard Schmidt, President Obama's former Cyber-Security Coordinator, told an audience of information security professionals and journalists at a Kaspersky Labs New York conference in January that the line between cyber war and cyber crime is blurred (as the National Intelligence Estimate seems to indicate), making U.S. government response tricky. Schmidt also claimed that unnamed foreign governments take kickbacks from the earnings of local cybercriminals targeting American corporations in a sort of quid-pro-pro for letting them operate. While Schmidt dislikes the use of the term cyber warfare--in a panel conversation with CEO Eugene Kaspersky he claimed the term is misleading--he also warned that malware is easy to militarize.



"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 08:08:56 PM EST
Nathan Heller: The Twentysomethings Are All Right : The New Yorker

They were dressed in jeans and sported close-cropped blond hair. One of them had an elongated, toothy face, and he went on, "We slaughter two thousand sheep every day, eighty thousand in the season. He cuts out the stomachs, and we put the carcasses in the freezer. Like an assembly line."

"You kind of need an iPod," the third said.

Back in Sweden, the guys told me, they were studying computer science at university, and--well, you know how it is: one thing leads to another, and soon you find yourself carving sheep bellies for a little extra cash. Jobs were hard to come by in Sweden, but Iceland welcomed the help. Slaughterhouse employees got free rooms and six meals a day. There was too much fish on the menu, maybe, but better that than the remaindered meat from the smokehouses. Why was that? I asked this in a conversation-making spirit, but my new acquaintances stared.

"You've noticed there are not so many trees in Iceland?" one asked at last.

Yeah, I said.

"Well, what do you think they do all the smoking with? It's a fifty-fifty mixture of--I don't know what the English word is. You dig it up. . . ."

"Peat?"

"Yeah, peat," he said. "That and shit."

"Yeah--shit," the long-faced one chimed in, his voice rising with indignation. "And, listen, I am Swedish. I
don't eat meat that has been smoked in shit."



"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 08:14:59 PM EST
Haha, you funny Europeans. First you won't eat horsemeat, then you won't eat meat smoked in shit...what's next, no Rocky Mountain oysters?

Starting to think that America has overtaken Europe in our willingness to eat the inedible...

by asdf on Tue Feb 19th, 2013 at 10:10:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, it was ever so.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:41:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
i don't see fried crispy pork rinds selling here in europe, but we have our fried mars bars, so...


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 01:33:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you mean this Danish speciality? They are exporting it all over Europe, I believe.

Now tell me more about fried Mars bars. Never heard about that abomination.
by Katrin on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 01:51:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here you go.

A deep-fried Mars bar is an ordinary Mars bar normally fried in a type of batter commonly used for deep-frying fish, sausages, and other battered products. The chocolate bar is typically chilled before battering to prevent it from melting into the frying fat ...

Me: bleech

YMMV

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:16:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sugar plus fat plus chocolate. Perfect.
by asdf on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:31:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And I thought burned marshmallows were the most horrible thing people can think of!
by Katrin on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:33:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Scots live on this.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:32:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Now, now! There are some very nice Scotspersons. Malcolm Tucker, for one.


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:35:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One can relive the Tucker Experience at wikiquotes.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:37:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They can be nice and live off deep-fried Mars bars.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:42:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, they absolutely cannot.


You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 03:00:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Splitter.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 03:06:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wouldn't sell them health or life insurance.


Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 04:06:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Let us not speak of Danish (and stations north) specialities. But since we must speak of them, (right?), how about this Finnish speciality:

Chocolate-covered salmiakki. They even make salmiak-flavoured ice cream.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:40:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The chocolate seems to be quite superfluous there.
by Katrin on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:43:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You don't know the half of it....

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:58:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If we're getting into gross disgusting Foods From the North we can't overlook the classic:



Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 04:13:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
On the American side, there's always Velveeta Clam Dip.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:49:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I have rediscovered the potato.

Ensconced as I am in a meal-sharing household of starch-deniers, I have been firmly on the 'full-corn' rice, pasta, and root school - easy and efficient to cook for one.

But the chance purchase of a large bag of local boiling spuds has reawakened my interest. With a knob of good butter! Ohhlalaa.

But better still - slightly undercook more than you need and pop 'em in the fridge later. (Slotted spoon needed). Then next day, first pressed rape oil heated in a wok and a handful of spuds added and tossed with a liberal sprinkle of Raz Al Hanout.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Wed Feb 20th, 2013 at 02:53:59 PM EST


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