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25 February 2013

by afew Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 04:01:51 PM EST

Your take on today's news media


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by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 11:48:42 AM EST
UK's top cardinal accused of 'inappropriate acts' by priests | World news | The Observer

Three priests and a former priest in Scotland have reported the most senior Catholic clergyman in Britain, Cardinal Keith O'Brien, to the Vatican over allegations of inappropriate behaviour stretching back 30 years.

The four, from the diocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh, have complained to nuncio Antonio Mennini, the Vatican's ambassador to Britain, and demanded O'Brien's immediate resignation. A spokesman for the cardinal said that the claims were contested.

O'Brien, who is due to retire next month, has been an outspoken opponent of gay rights, condemning homosexuality as immoral, opposing gay adoption, and most recently arguing that same-sex marriages would be "harmful to the physical, mental and spiritual well-being of those involved". Last year he was named "bigot of the year" by the gay rights charity Stonewall.

One of the complainants, it is understood, alleges that the cardinal developed an inappropriate relationship with him, resulting in a need for long-term psychological counselling.

The four submitted statements containing their claims to the nuncio's office the week before Pope Benedict's resignation on 11 February. They fear that, if O'Brien travels to the forthcoming papal conclave to elect a new pope, the church will not fully address their complaints.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:04:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think their timing is regrettable, seeing as the hate-filled pus bag retires next week.

Hunter has a great essay on Satan discussing the ongoing revelations of criminality by members of the Catholic church hierarchy and how this compares with their increasingly public moralizing about the most banal of issues

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:23:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Cardinal Keith O'Brien resigns amid claims of inappropriate behaviour | World news | guardian.co.uk

Cardinal Keith O'Brien, the UK's most senior Roman Catholic cleric, has resigned with immediate effect after being accused of "inappropriate acts" towards fellow priests.

The Scottish Catholic church announced that Pope Benedict had accepted the cardinal's resignation as archbishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh, which came after the Observer disclosed a series of allegations by three priests and one former priest.

O'Brien has denied the allegations and had been expected to continue in his post as head of the Scottish Catholic church until mid-March, when he was due to retire at age 75.

Is there a quorum required to elect a pope?

But seriously... the likely outcome, I suppose, is for a "conservative", homophobe pope from Africa or Latin America, who will clear out the "gay lobby" or whatever.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:44:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I read somewhere that the Pope didn't feel strong enough to purge his own Curia, so he resigned so that an incoming pope could get rid of all the paedophiles in the Vatican under cover or "new Pope brings in his own team".

Ratzinger wasn't a "new Pope" by any stretch, having been Wojtila's right-hand man for over 20 years.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:36:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thing is, as I understand it, that Rat-boy, having been JPII's enforcer, was primarily responsible for many of the appointments over the last 25 years.

To deal with any problems amongst the current senior clerics would have been to question his own judgement on people

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 09:01:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
People who still take religion seriously ... other than as a cover for criminality.

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 11:40:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Like economics...

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 11:48:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Q: What's the difference between a priest and an economist?
A: The priest will settle for just 10% of your money, and wants your eternal soul to go to the same place as his own.

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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 01:01:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Cyprus election: Nicos Anastasiades elected president

Centre-right leader Nicos Anastasiades has won the Cypriot presidential election with 57.5% of the vote.

It was a comfortable victory over Communist-backed Stavros Malas on 42.5%. Mr Malas has conceded victory.

Mr Anastasiades takes power as Cyprus stands on the brink of bankruptcy, hit by the knock-on effect of Greece's economic woes.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:16:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence email news briefing:

The Conservative Nicos Anastasiades has won the elections in Cyrpus, with over 57% of the votes. Kathimerini cites reports that he will appoint Christopher Pissarides as his finance minister. The FT has an interesting story quoting "some who have met his team" as saying was not prepared to accept demands by the EU and the IMF, especially on privatisations. The quotes an interview in which Anastasiades said he wanted to postpone privatisation for three years, depending on the speed of recovery. He vehemently rejected any proposal to bail in depositors, saying it would threaten the existence of the eurozone. He also rejected a proposal from the Ecofin to a appoint an independent auditor to audit the country's financial sector.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 02:32:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC News - Italy votes in election seen as key for economic recovery

Italians have begun voting in general elections seen as crucial for the country's effort to tackle its economic problems, as well as for the eurozone.

Estimates published before a ban on polls two weeks ago gave a lead to Pier Luigi Bersani's centre-left alliance.

It was thought to be a few points ahead of the centre-right bloc led by ex-Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:17:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 02:34:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
IPS - Winter of Discontent Progresses to Bulgaria | Inter Press Service

WARSAW, Feb 24 2013 (IPS) - Bulgarian prime minister Boiko Borisov of the ruling centre-right Citizens for the European Development of Bulgaria (GERB), announced his resignation Wednesday, following two weeks of sustained protests across the country which were sparked by rising electricity and heating costs.

Borisov, a populist politician whose party has been in power since 2009, announced his resignation to the parliament with the words, "It is the people who put us in power and we give it back to them today."

"Most people see Borisov's resignation as a way to desert the sinking ship of the Bulgarian state amidst the crisis previous cabinets started and he deepened," writes Mariya Ivancheva, a Bulgarian sociologist from the Central European University.

The prime minister's resignation could well be meant to prevent the further downfall of GERB, whose public support eroded during the years in government and which was expected to lose the upcoming July elections. Following the resignation, it is likely Bulgaria will see early elections, no sooner than mid-April.

Bulgarians were not appeased by the gesture: people continued taking to the streets after the announcement, and a big protest is scheduled to take place Sunday in Sofia.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:22:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Mass protests erupt across Bulgaria - Europe - Al Jazeera English

Tens of thousands of people have taken to the streets across Bulgaria to protest against corruption and the country's rising cost of living.

The demonstrations on Sunday come a week after nationwide demonstrations forced the conservative government to resign.

More than 10,000 protesters marched in downtown Sofia under the slogan "End to illusions, civil action every day!"

They shouted "Mafia!" and "All parties out!" near parliament and the presidency, waving white-green-and-red Bulgarian flags.

Rosen Pleveliev, the president of Bulgaria, appeared briefly before the crowd but was greeted with boos and jeers.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:25:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
These protests are long overdue, but I rather fear they will be ineffective given the depth of corruption within the country

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:25:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EU probe launched into so-called 'revolving door' practice: theparliament.com
European ombudsman Nikiforos Diamandouros has launched an investigation into the commission's alleged failure to prevent conflicts of interest among staff as a result of the 'revolving door' - where EU staff take up jobs with lobby firms.

A complaint was filed by the Corporate Europe Observatory (CEO), Greenpeace, Lobbycontrol and Spinwatch, who argued that the commission's failure to properly address conflicts of interest allows private interests undue access and influence in public policy-making.

The complaint focuses on the executive's alleged failure to implement rules in its internal staff regulations to guard against the revolving door problem.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:30:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Commissioner welcomes new EU-wide offshore oil and gas deal: theparliament.com

Energy commissioner Günther Oettinger has welcomed new proposals to introduce the first ever EU-wide offshore oil and gas safety legislation.

The provisional deal, agreed by MEPs and member states on Thursday, requires oil and gas firms to obtain a licence to drill dependent on them submitting major hazard reports and emergency response plans, as well as proving their ability to remedy any environmental damage that they may cause.

Oettinger said, "These rules will make sure that the highest safety standards already mostly in place in some member states will be followed at every oil and gas platform across Europe.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:31:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Clegg on defensive as sexual harassment claims batter party | Reuters

(Reuters) - Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg on Sunday denied covering up allegations of sexual misconduct by a former senior member of his Liberal Democrat party, already floundering in opinion polls.

Allegations of sexual impropriety by former party chief executive Chris Rennard threaten to engulf Clegg and further undermine the Lib Dems, the junior member of Britain's coalition government.

The latest furore comes at a bad time for the party, after the resignation of cabinet minister Chris Huhne this month who admitted he had asked his then wife to accept a penalty for a 2003 speeding offence he had committed.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 02:53:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, let's say he looked pretty stupid sending out a categorical statement he knew nothing about it till the recent Ch4 programme at the same time as an email surfaced demonstrating he knew 5 years ago

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:27:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We've had "naive" - in believeing a single word the Tories said about "cooperation".

But downright stupid? Not sure. Isn't "at some point everything will become public knowledge" the basic rule of politics?

Oh, well, damage control mode for a bit.

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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 01:16:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence Daily Morning Newsbriefing: Anastasiades wins in Cyprus but now says No privatisations for three years (25.02.2013)
Conservative candidate wins with 57% of the vote; a report says he will appoint Christopher Pissarides as his finance minister; has toughened his stance on the bailout criteria: does not want privatisations for another three years; also vigorously opposes bail-in of depositors and external audit of the financial sector, as proposed by Ecofin; Simon Nixon argues that Cyprus is the country to worry about in the eurozone, not Italy; first-day turnout in the Italian polls has been lower than last time, but higher than expected, considering the bad weather; turnout in three swing regions of Lombardy, Veneto and Lazio was higher than last time - a trend that should favour the right, and Beppe Grillo; an Italian journalist published the polls on his website: all showing a comfortable margin of victory for Pier Luigi Bersani, while some showed a strong surge by Grillo; the Swiss government double-crossed Silvio Berlusconi on the eve of the election, saying that the tax treaty he wants to milk for electoral purpose will not come into force until 2015 at the earliest;  Eugenio Scalfari says don't worry too much about Grillo, the real issue is whether Bersani can enact reforms - which he seems to doubt; Mario Calabresi understands the anger of many Italians, but says rage does not help either; Olli Rehn reminds Italians that no matter who they vote for, the new government has to continue fiscal consolidation; Spanish newspapers report that the King was ready to allow his son-in-law to fall in order to save the monarchy; there have been large anti-government protests in several Spanish cities over the weekend, prompting the government to compare the demonstration to the 1981 coup d'état; cash-depleted Spanish scientists turn to crowd-funding; half of Spanish pilots are now looking for employment abroad; El Pais has asked ten economists about Olli Rehn, and finds that 8 in their sample disagree with his policies; Paul Krugman disagrees even more, calling him the "face of denialism"; Kevin O'Rourke says Rehn is complacent for playing down the sharp drop in GDP in the fourth quarter; the European Commission has published its 2013 eurozone forecasts, showing a 0.1% contraction of GDP; Pierre Moscovici accuses Commission of getting its numbers wrong for France; Benoit Coeuré says the French government should sticks to its medium-term budget forecast; four Irish trade unions walk out of process to agree pay cuts;Philip Plikert says different views on exchange rates in the eurozone merely reflect different optimal national exchange rates; Wolfgang Munchau says reform has become synonymous with austerity, as governments are running out of political capital to undertake genuine reforms; Adam Posen, meanwhile, says the UK has become very European in the way it deals with its problems - by not confronting them.


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 03:58:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Olli Rehn reminds Italians that no matter who they vote for, the new government has to continue fiscal consolidation;"

Good to see that democracy is alive and well.

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi

by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:00:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Rehn says Italy must continue fiscal consolidation

Il Sole 24 Ore quotes Olli Rehn as saying that Italy does not new austerity measures to meet budget targets but the new government must continue with the fiscal consolidation process. According to the latest forecasts by the European Commission, the Italian gross debt is projected to peak at 128.1% of GDP in 2013, before falling in 2014. Unemployment will rise from 10.6% to 12.0% in 2014.  

8 in 10 economists agree: Rehn is to blame^

Motivated by the recent controversy between Olli Rehn and economic analysists critical of austerity (including from the IMF), El Pais garners the opinions of 10 prominent economists on whether the European Commission is to blame for Europe's poor economic prospects. Among those queried, the answer is overwhelmingly yes, with the exception of former ECB board member José Manuel González-Páramo and Bruegel's Guntram Wolff. Some quotes:

  • Paul de Grauwe says: the EU authorities are responsible for the recession ... the Eurozone's macroeconomic policy is a disaster"

  • James Galbraith says: the Commission's leadership seems to work in an alternate reality, indifferent to the consequences of its policies"

  • Luis Garicano says: Brussels is incomprehensibly dogmatic [and] neglects the probability of a serious accident"

  • José Manuel González-Páramo says: in a way we're all responsible for the recession ... The Commission's proposals are advanced and forward-looking"

  • Paul Krugman blogged these people have done terrible damage and stll have the power to continue"

  • Desmond Lachman says: The Commission was very slow to draw the conclusion that the IMF did: excessive austerity with the Euro as straitjacket is counterproductive"

  • Jonathan Portes says: The optimistic conclusion is that [Rehn] is admitting the justifications for austerity are crumbling"

  • Dani Rodrik says: "The Commission has been fooling itself with the illusion that the structural reforms it spouses can stimulate the economy in the middle of an activity plunge made worse by austerity measures"

  • Guntram Wolff says: "Considering all the constraints the Commission is subject to, it's adopted generally adequate policies, trying to strike a balance between fiscal consolidation and supporting the economy"

  • Charles Wyplosz says: "The Commission makes politically correct forecasts knowing full well they will have to appear surprised when they are not fulfilled."

More Rehn-criticism from Krugman and O'Rourke

In his latest blog-entry Paul Krugman is picking on Olli Rehn big-time, calling him "the face of denialism". He makes the points that official job about the decline in spreads and reduced dispersion in unit labour was a sign that the eurozone crisis is healing. Nothing of the sort, he says. The spreads have declined because of the LTRO and OMT, and while unit labour costs have converged a little, they have only converged by a fraction of what needs to be done. He agrees with Paul de Grauwe's most recent analysis - that austerity was unnecessary and too extreme.

 This is from is Kevin O'Rourke in the Irish economy blog. We normally do not quote in full, but this is impossible to summarise.

You might have thought that the disastrous but wholly unsurprising eurozone GDP numbers indicate that the bloc is in a bad way, and will continue to be so until the current macroeconomic policy mix is jettisoned.

Happily, Olli "Don't mention the multiplier" Rehn has good news for us:

The current situation can be summarised like this: we have disappointing hard data from the end of last year, some more encouraging soft data in the recent past and growing investor confidence in the future.
Thank goodness for that."


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:04:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Adam Posen on how the UK has become European (not a compliment)
This is a very thoughtful piece by Adam Posen, who argues that the UK has become very European in the way it deals with its economic problems - by not addressing them. He argues the basic problem is that the UK tries to solve fiscal problems through monetary policy, just as the eurozone is doing.  This policy is producing uncertainty. Posen cites the long process to review the Bank of England's inflation targeting regime and the 2017 date for a UK referendum on Europe as examples for decision postponed to the future.

Previous Krugman:

Suppose George Osborne were to admit that austerity isn't working. What, then, would be left of his claim to be qualified to do, well, anything?"


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:07:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Osborne's 'claim' is that he's born to the job - and his job is handing government money to rich people by taking it from poor people.

He's not doing badly at that.

Austerity and econo-doom are unfortunate side effects. But the very rich aren't affected by them, so they don't see any reason to care.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:48:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Good point. Krugman may be inferring things about "merit", "competence" and "elections" that have nothing to do with reality.

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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:36:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the UK has become very European in the way it deals with its economic problems - by not addressing them. He argues the basic problem is that the UK tries to solve fiscal problems through monetary policy, just as the eurozone is doing
The first is arguably being European. The second is being a dogmatic post-1970s monetarist.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:34:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Horsemeat found in Ikea meatballs | UK news | guardian.co.uk

Furniture store Ikea became the latest company caught up in the Europe-wide horsemeat scandal when Czech inspectors found equine DNA in meatballs made for the group in Sweden.

The Czech State Veterinary Administration found evidence of horse during DNA tests on products labelled as beef and pork meatballs from Ikea in the city of Brno.

The consignment of meatballs had not been distributed to consumers, the government body said. A spokesman did not know whether the meatballs were distributed in other European countries.

I can no longer say with certainty that I've never eaten horse, because I confess I've eaten Ikea meatballs. Not bad with blabar or Klingon jam.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:57:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian - Alex Renton - How Britain got a taste for horsemeat

Among the many side-effects of the horsemeat scandal - alongside the rare smiles on the faces of high‑street butchers', a rise in the sale of home meat grinders, and big sulks at Tesco - is the fact that more Britons are now eating horse (knowingly) than they have since the second world war.

Pubs across the land have been offering horsemeat, usually with a Shergarburger gag on the menu board. While Oliver Peyton is the latest high-end restaurateur to test the equivore (or, possibly, hippophage) market with a pop-up - this Friday he'll be cooking horse tartare and sirloin at the National Gallery's Café. Joke: there's oats for pudding.

Meanwhile exotic meats suppliers Kezie Foods of Berwickshire, reports sales of horse up more than 100%, both to private customers and to restaurants and butchers. Their horse mince - sourced either in France or Brazil - costs a tempting £3.50 for 500g and a 1kg rump roast is £22.

Could horse catch on? It is half the price of beef and undeniably delicious.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:12:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And yet I still cannot get beef bones.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 09:03:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Try your local butcher, often they get their delivery one day a week and if you go in on that day, they'll have a load.

Or try a halal butcher who are far more likely to keep bones as these feature more in arabic cooking

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 09:26:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What's the big deal about eating horse? Is it the "they're serving my pet" syndrome or do horses get drugs we don't want in our system? Or something else? What are we suppose to do with a dead horse anyway if not eat him/her?

The good news ... it's only a life sentence. You eventually leave this planet of idiots.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 12:14:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is a lot of "they're serving my pet" in this, but the major thing is that if you are buying beef, it ought to all be coming from a cow.

If you wanna buy cheap mince, then label it 75/25 beef/horse or whatever.

The crime is the mis-representation of content

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 12:20:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Flog it, I think.
To make the meat more tender.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 12:56:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"What are we suppose to do with a dead horse anyway if not eat him/her?"

Owners of foals must decide immediately if the horse is to be butchered for human consumption one day, or if it is a pet horse. Pet horses can get (and do get) all sorts of medicine, butcher-horses (or whatever they are called) only a limited range. All this has to be documented.

We don't believe that the horse meat that the fraudsters smuggled into the supermarkets as beef is free from banned medicine, do we? That's doped old horse in the burger, I assume. The meat from the few un-doped horses there are is probably sold in a controlled way and at a reasonable price, not as cheap stuff for burgers.

by Katrin on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 02:21:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Katrin:
We don't believe that the horse meat that the fraudsters smuggled into the supermarkets as beef is free from banned medicine, do we?

Insofar as the present glut comes from Romania, where the horses drew carts for poor peasants, there's a good chance they never saw anything in the way of pharmaceuticals, banned or otherwise.

OTOH, some horsemeat imported into France from the UK was found to contain phenylbutazone, commonly used to dope racehorses.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 at 02:11:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree that the Romanian horses are probably unproblematic, but I suspect that each Romanian horse has supplied a few tonnes of horse meat.
by Katrin on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 at 01:32:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Irish horses are being slaughtered at a massive rate and I don't believe for one second that they're not finding their way into the food chain. I fully expect that we'll find horse meat going from Ireland to Poland to Ireland (at least virtually) and ending up in burgers.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 at 01:42:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wormers, vaccines, all sorts of other good stuff that may or may not be cleared for human consumption - not to mention sick animals. That's the real problem that everyone is trying to avoid talking about.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 at 01:40:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I assume I've eaten horse. Mostly in the form of hair when she's shedding, but still.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:35:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Litvinenko inquest: newspapers launch challenge over withholding of evidence | World news | guardian.co.uk

Media groups will on Tuesday challenge what they describe as a "deeply troubling" attempt by the government to withhold evidence from the inquest into the murder of Alexander Litvinenko.

The Guardian, the BBC, the Financial Times and other newspapers are challenging a submission by the foreign secretary, William Hague, to conceal sensitive documents. Hague argues the material could harm "national security", as well as the UK's "international relations".
[snip]

Speaking on Monday, Litvinenko's friend Alex Goldfarb said the foreign secretary appeared unwilling to offend Russia's "vindictive" president. Goldfarb told the Guardian: "I recognise that Mr Hague has a well-founded interest not to rock the boat with [Vladimir] Putin. He's afraid. He's afraid Putin will not vote the way he wants in the UN or squeeze Britain's interests."

He added: "The inquest is a balance between the interests of international relations and justice. The bottom line is how far do you compromise with your own justice and decency, and the benefits from doing business with arrogant, murderous and dictatorial foreign states?"

Only as far as necessary, old chap. And no further. One has principles, after all.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 10:27:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 11:49:06 AM EST
Libor scandal no threat to Deutsche Bank co-chief Jain: sources | Reuters

(Reuters) - Deutsche Bank co-chief executive Anshu Jain will likely not be sacked as a result of the investigations into the bank for manipulating Libor interbank rates, three people with knowledge of the matter told Reuters.

The current findings of financial services watchdog BaFin would not lead to Jain's dismissal, said the three people, who declined to be identified, confirming a story in German weekly newspaper Welt am Sonntag.

"One needs to find more to justify using this heavy weapon," said one of the people.

The traders investigated for rigging Libor (the London interbank offered rate) worked several levels below Jain so he could not be made responsible for any wrongdoing by them, Welt am Sonntag reported.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 02:53:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Of course not, the guilty never suffer. They just get a bigger bonus to make up for all the nasty embarrssment

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:29:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Divide between European and U.S. telcos widens | Reuters

(Reuters) - When the bosses of global mobile operators meet in Barcelona this week, there will be an elephant in the room: the widening gap between fast-growing and richly-valued U.S. telecoms companies and their ailing European counterparts.

A overcrowded market, tough regulations and recession are hampering European telcos' ability to invest in faster networks, increasing the risk that the region's flagging economy falls further behind the United States and parts of Asia.

As a result, a transatlantic gap in company valuations has opened to its widest since 2008, with European telco stocks now trading at roughly 9.9 times earnings against 17.6 times for U.S. peers.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:34:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's such a good sign when companies trade for 17.6 times earnings.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:35:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
U.S. Ranks 24th in World in Broadband Speed | Speed Matters - Internet Speed Test
  • When it comes to consumer prices, "We find U.S. prices for standalone fixed broadband are in the mid-level range in our 38 country survey, but are higher in higher speed tiers."
  • As for universal access, "The United States ranks 15th out of 34 countries for overall fixed (wired) broadband subscriptions (27.3) per 100 inhabitants."
  • And in terms of broadband speeds, "The United States ranks 24th (11.6 Mbps) in terms of actual download speeds based on the weighted averages of all city data."

US Telco's are awesome. It's just their product that is decidedly mediocre.

Von überall könnte das Volk, Urbrut alles Undemokratischen, Zelle des Terrors, über die gewählten Hüter von Wachstum und Wohlstand® kommen. - flatter

by generic on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 05:01:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Interesting how this looks not at quality or even how the company is performing, but at how it's value. That's at least two steps removed from reality.

US companies are better at charging an arm and a leg.


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:12:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
US companies are better at charging an arm and a leg.

That's PPP, Purchased Pricing Power.

As the Dutch said while fighting the Spanish: "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 12:09:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
UK downgrade pressures reluctant Osborne to change course | Reuters

(Reuters) - Britain's chancellor insisted on Saturday he would not change course after the loss of the country's 'AAA' credit rating but George Osborne is facing pressure to do just that as his bet on austerity falters ahead of the 2015 election.

Moody's dealt Britain its first sovereign rating downgrade on Friday, saying the $2.5 trillion economy faced years more sluggish growth and debt would continue to rise until 2016.

Economically the one-notch cut will have limited importance -- most of Europe, Japan and the United States have already suffered the same fate and Britain continues to borrow at historically low rates.

But politically it is toxic for Osborne who has repeatedly vowed to protect the top credit rating since the 2010 election campaign.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:36:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Amazing stuff.
Osborne led Cameron's bid for leadership of the Conservatives and ran the 2010 election campaign. There is little or no chance of him being sacrificed or being forced into a humiliating policy U-turn which would wreck his career

Yeah, that's what we're all worried about.

Business lobby the Confederation of British Industry has called for more investment on infrastructure and housing to be funded by more cuts in day-to-day spending. It also expects the government to guarantee more private-sector projects.

So tax payers money will be used to guarantee private profits. Could we not eliminate the middleman and run government projects directly?

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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:21:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"Though Labour is about 10 percentage points ahead of Conservative Party in polls, surveys show voters trust Cameron and Osborne more than Labour's leader Ed Miliband."

Well, at some point you've got to throw up your hands and say that at least some people are getting what they deserve...

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi

by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 12:20:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No argument here.
You'll have me arguing for lower taxes in a moment! At least then I can decide for myself, rather than having faceless eurocrats ... oh, help I need my medication.

Was it Michael Moore that said "all the Democrats know how to do is lose elections"? Feels like Labour is doing that.

Sadly I'm not aware that Labour is strongly talking about an alternative - are they still sort of listening to the public to see if this austerity thing is what the masses want deep down?

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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 01:07:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Far from me to want to lionise Labour -especially New Labour. Though since the crisis broke out, they had not done too badly.

Anyway, we're not talking about trusting Milliband in absolute. It's in comparison to Cameron and Osborne! How much more drivel do they need to say for people to reckon that they are a nutjob?

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi

by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 01:21:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The problem for Labour right now is that their economic policy consists mainly of Ed Balls saying "you see that crappy austerity policy enacted by the tories that isn't working, well we're gonna do more or less the same".

It isn't credible, it sounds as stupid as it is and the voters aren't buying it. Especially as they know the stupid twerp actually believes it

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 01:28:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How much more drivel do they need to say for people to reckon that they are a nutjob?

That depends on what fraction of the media is owned by their friends.


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 at 05:55:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He foolishly erected triple-A status as a virility symbol.

For quote of the week.

Vencit omnia veritas.

by Luis de Sousa (luis[dot]a[dot]de[dot]sousa[at]gmail[dot]com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:12:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A pity about the premature austerity.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 09:04:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Abe preparing to nominate Kuroda as BOJ chief | Kyodo News
Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is preparing to nominate Asian Development Bank President Haruhiko Kuroda as the next Bank of Japan governor, several government sources said Sunday.
     Abe is expected to present his nominee to replace outgoing BOJ Governor Masaaki Shirakawa to parliament in the middle of this week. The nomination of the new governor, as well as those of two deputy governors, must be approved by both chambers of the Diet.
     Kuroda, 68, served as vice finance minister for international affairs from 1999 to 2003 and has extensive international connections.
     He is also known as an advocate of Abe's aggressive monetary easing to overcome chronic deflation.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:40:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 11:49:35 AM EST
Ten Chadian soldiers killed fighting Islamists in Mali | Reuters

N'DJAMENA/GAO (Reuters) - Ten Chadian soldiers were killed in combat in northern Mali's mountainous border with Algeria where Islamist rebels regrouped after losing urban areas to a French-led offensive, Chad's army said on Sunday.

The latest Chadian fatalities came in an area of the Adrar des Ifoghas mountains where 13 Chadian soldiers were killed in clashes on Friday that centered around what one senior commander said was a rebel base of "significant importance". At least 93 rebels have been killed in fighting in the area so far, Chad's army said.

The casualties, the heaviest by African troops since a campaign against al Qaeda-linked Islamist rebels began six weeks ago, highlight risks that the French-led coalition becomes entangled by guerrilla war as it helps Mali's weak army.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 02:55:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IPS - Malian Refugees Wanting to Return Home Face Difficult Choices | Inter Press Service

NIAMEY, Feb 23 2013 (IPS) - When northern Malian refugees fled their country for Niger in 2012, they expected they would be able to return home shortly afterwards. But despite the armed intervention by the French army in the West African nation, few of the 50,000 Niger-based refugees are ready to leave for home just yet.

"Have you watched the news? Do you honestly think we can go home under these conditions?" asked Omar*, the vice-president of the Association for Malian Refugee Families in Niamey, the Nigerien capital.

Omar and thousands of others spilled across the border into neighboring countries in the months following the occupation of the country's north by armed Islamist groups allied with Al-Qaeda back in April 2012.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:23:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Karzai expels US forces from Afghan province - Central & South Asia - Al Jazeera English

Hamid Karzai, the Afghan president, has ordered the withdrawal of US special forces from a restive eastern province in Afghanistan within two weeks.

At a press conference in the Afghan capital on Sunday, Aimal Faizi, presidential spokesman, said US special forces were responsible for furthering "insecurity and instability" Maidan Wardak.

"In today's [weekly] national security council meeting, Afghan President Hamid Karzai ordered the ministry of defence to kick out the US special forces from Wardak ... within two weeks," Faizi said.

Faizi said "misconduct" by people linked to the US special forces in Wardak included the beheading of a student and the capture of nine missing locals.

A statement issued by the national security council said "it became clear that armed individuals named as US special force stationed in Wardak province engage in harassing, annoying, torturing and even murdering innocent people".

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 02:59:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
IPS - Democracy Tastes Bitter as Poverty Bites | Inter Press Service

In the two years since the uprising, Egypt's battered economy has taken hit after hit. Political turmoil and labour unrest have shuttered factories, forced layoffs, and scared away tourists and investors. Economic growth has slowed to a crawl, while foreign reserves have withered to critically low levels.

The small workshop where Moussa once fashioned ornamental brass lamps is closed, its owner having absorbed months of losses before laying off his six employees. Some have found jobs in other workshops at a lower salary. Others are still looking.

But with the national unemployment rate at 13 percent, competition for jobs is fierce. Like many, Moussa's only option was to seek work in the informal sector, where job security is absent.

"Since the revolution, employers are reluctant to hire," he says. "You work for a few days, then get laid off, and start looking for work again."

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:20:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 11:50:15 AM EST
IPS - Biofuels Converting U.S. Prairielands at Dust Bowl Rates | Inter Press Service

WASHINGTON, Feb 23 2013 (IPS) - The rush for biofuels in the United States has seen farmers converting the United States' prairie lands to farms at rates comparable with deforestation levels in Brazil, Malaysia and Indonesia - rates not seen here since the Dust Bowl of the 1930s.

A new study finds that, between 2006 and 2011, U.S. farmers converted more than 1.3 million acres of grassland into corn and soybean fields. Driven by high crop prices, biofuel subsidies and a confluence of other factors, states like Iowa and South Dakota have been turning some five percent of prairie into cropland each year, according to the report's authors, Christopher Wright and Michael Wimberly of South Dakota State University.

The researchers suggest that farmers are growing crops on increasingly marginal land, in part because the federal government offers subsidised crop insurance in case of failure. In Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota, for instance, corn and soy are planted in areas that are especially vulnerable to drought.

Numerous incentives have encouraged the ploughing of grasslands. The federal system of financial payments to grain farmers has long encouraged conversion of grasslands to farms, but in recent years new subsidies for corn ethanol and other biofuel production have significantly stepped up this inducement.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:25:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
sings "I see trouble ahead..."

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:31:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If only it were "Raindrops keep falling on my head."
Rain will be elsewhere and in abundance.

Water pipelines?


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:23:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Turning carbon dioxide to fuel
Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington are pioneering a new method for using carbon dioxide, or CO2, to make liquid methanol fuel by using copper oxide nanowires and sunlight. The process is safer, simpler and less expensive than previous methods to convert the greenhouse gas associated with climate change to a useful product, said Krishnan Rajeshwar, interim associate vice president for research at UT Arlington and one of the authors of a paper recently published in the journal Chemical Communications.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:43:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Study: Organic Tomatoes Are Better for You | Mother Jones

Remember that Stanford research meta-analysis purporting to show that organic food offers no real health advantages? (I poked some holes in it here). Buried in the study (I have a full copy but can't post it for copyright reasons) is the finding that organic foods tend to have higher levels of phenols--compounds, naturally occurring in plants, widely believed to fight cancer and other degenerative diseases.

(...)

A paper published Feb. 20 in PLOS One highlighted the link between organic agriculture and phenols. A team of researchers compared total phenol content in organic and conventional tomatoes grown in nearby plots in Brazil. By cultivating the tomatoes in the same microclimate and in similar soil, the researchers were able to control for environmental factors that might otherwise affect nutrient content.

The result: Total phenolic content was 139 percent higher in the organic tomatoes than in the conventional at the time of harvest; and vitamin C content clocked in at 55 percent higher.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:49:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And no fish genes.

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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:25:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Global wind energy capacity grows 19 percent in 2012

The Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) recently released its 2012 market statistics, showing continued expansion of the market, with global installed wind energy capacity increasing by 19 per cent in 2012 to 282,000 MW. Canada remains a global wind energy leader as it experienced the 9th largest increase in installed capacity in 2012 (936 MW). Both China and the United States, the world's wind energy leaders, installed more than 13,000 MW of new capacity in 2012.

"While China paused for breath, both the US and European markets had exceptionally strong years," said Steve Sawyer, Secretary General of GWEC. "Asia still led global markets, but with North America a close second, and Europe not far behind."

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:52:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
("Boring, too late, too little, not relevant, what if the wind doesn't blow? Al Gore is fat.")

Good stuff.

Increase peaked in 2009 and seems to have been slower with the recession. Perhaps it will pick up?

Europe has had a very modest increase in use over the past two decades. When will China reach that level?

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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:53:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Joe Nocera knows from boneheaded | Grist
The basic idea is that, as long as there's demand for fossil fuels, there's going to be supply, so we might as well get the good oil from Canada (even though it's dirtier) than the bad oil from Venezuela. Neither Nocera nor the dozens of other Very Serious People who repeat this argument explain why Venezuelan oil is worse for us than Canadian oil, despite its lower carbon footprint. Perhaps it has Chavez cooties in it? Fans of basic economics will recall that oil is a fungible commodity sold on a world market; if Venezuela does something extra-socialist that raises the price of oil, we'll be paying more, even if the oil we're burning comes from Alberta. The whole construct of "independence" from "foreign oil" (oddly, we don't count Canada as foreign any more) is goofy. But like Joe Scarborough with the deficit, Nocera knows it's a problem because, well, everybody knows it's a problem.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:54:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Joe Scarborough Hates Moms, PowerPoint | NYMAG | Chait
What makes Joe Scarborough such an enjoyable figure is his combination of affability, good intentions, high self-regard, low self-awareness, and total lack of analytical reasoning skills. He is not remotely dislikable. He is Ron Burgundy come to life.
[...]
Everybody Scarborough knows believes one thing, so if you disagree, you're an ideologue. Case closed! He has many leather-bound books!
[...]

Can we get Scarborough to moderate a serious debate between Ali G and Alan Partridge?


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:59:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Monsanto to appeal Brazil GM seed ruling

Biotechnology giant Monsanto Co. plans to appeal a Brazilian court ruling that threatens to put at risk billions of dollars in royalty payments from Brazilian farmers.

The U.S. agricultural products company said it is seeking extension of the patent on its Roundup Ready soybean seed, used by millions of Brazilian farmers, to counter the claims.

The dispute assumed epic proportions last year when millions of Brazilian farmers sued Monsanto over what they claimed were overpayments of royalties on genetically modified soybean seeds.

The court ruled in favor of the farmers, saying Monsanto owes them at least $2 billion paid since 2004.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:56:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
59% of the 'Tuna' Americans Eat Is Not Tuna | Atlantic
Nonprofit ocean protection group Oceana took 1,215 samples of fish from across the United States and genetically tested them in order to bring us the following astonishing facts:

  • 59% of the fish labeled "tuna" sold at restaurants and grocery stores in the US is not tuna.
  • Sushi restaurants were far more likely to mislabel their fish than grocery stores or other restaurants.
[...]
If you've ever wondered why the sushi in the display case is so affordable, given the dire state of the world's tuna supply, well, now you know.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:12:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That cheap horsemeat is getting everywhere.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:44:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
what fish, eaten raw, can be mistaken for tuna.

Now I know, and I rather wish I didn't :

Use Caution When Eating Escolar | The Kitchn

To be frankly and bluntly specific - and I'm sorry for this - consumption of escolar causes explosive, oily, orange diarrhea. People have reported that the discharges are often difficult to control and accidents can happen while passing gas. I personally know someone who ate an escolar steak one night, unaware of its side effects. The next day he was riding the elevator to his office when out of nowhere his bowels unleashed a surprise attack on his pants. As he said later, "Thank God I had my gym bag with me, which had a clean pair of underwear in it." This explains why escolar is also called the "olestra fish" and the "ex-lax fish."


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:01:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 11:50:36 AM EST
Scientists attacked over claim that 'junk DNA' is vital to life | Science | The Observer

It was the scientific surprise of 2012. Researchers announced they had found that long stretches of human DNA - previously dismissed as "junk" - were in fact crucial to the working of our bodies. The assumption that our cells are controlled by only a few genes was wrong.

Scientists on the Encode project - an international public consortium researching the human genome - argued that most of our DNA has a part to play.

But this idea is now the subject of an astonishingly vitriolic attack from other scientists, who say that Encode's "absurd" ideas are the work of people who know nothing about evolutionary biology. "News concerning the death of junk DNA has been greatly exaggerated," they insist.

The row divides scientists over the most fundamental of questions - is most of our DNA devoid of purpose or does it play a major role in our cells? The debate has been triggered by a critique in the Genome Biology and Evolution journal that is striking for its strident language.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:05:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Scientists attacked over claim that 'junk DNA' is vital to life | Science | The Observer
Most of the human genome is devoid of function and these people are wrong to say otherwise.

Wow, that certainly sounds scientific. Vatican style. Reputations and careers at stake, much?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:51:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC knew of Jimmy Savile's 'dark side' before tribute aired | Media | The Observer

The BBC misled the public by broadcasting glowing tributes to Jimmy Savile although key managers knew he had "dark sides" to his personality, detailed interviews with BBC staff reveal.

Celebrations of the life and work of Savile that were aired on the BBC after his death helped to continue to mask his criminal behaviour and hide the damage he had left behind him, aside from the now notorious dropping of the planned Newsnight investigation into his crimes at a children's home.

The BBC inquiry transcripts that were made public on Friday show that those who commissioned programmes about the late radio DJ and television presenter were "queasy" about portraying his personality. Interviews given by top BBC executives to last year's inquiry panel, chaired by Sky's Nick Pollard, have now laid bare the extent of the corporation's communication failures and errors of judgment when it came to telling the truth about Savile.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:11:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not so much a case of left hand not knowing what the right hand is doing as absolutely nobody having any overview on what was happening at all.

The BBC is too big for sensitive libel-worthy rumour and innuendo of that nature to be widely known

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:35:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Saying "the BBC" is a bit like saying "the NHS" or "the government".


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:05:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And note that once again the Whole Issue with Savile is the BBC.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:45:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wild plants are infected with many viruses and still thrive

Researchers have studied viruses as agents of disease in humans, domestic animals and plants, but a study of plant viruses in the wild may point to a more cooperative, benevolent role of the microbe, according to a Penn State virologist.

"Most of these wild plants have viruses," said Marilyn Roossinck, professor of plant pathology and environmental microbiology and biology, who has examined more than 7,000 individual plants for viruses. "But they don't have any of the symptoms that we usually see in crop plants with viruses."

Most of the viruses Roossinck studied are new viruses, although they are related to viruses that have been examined in crops. According to the researcher, about half of the viruses that infect wild plants tend to be continually present in the plant -- persistent.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 03:57:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
People are ridiculously phobic about viruses and bacteria.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 05:01:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Right.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 02:28:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
tho I could get ridiculously phobic about flu virii from here on

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:36:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
virologists are paid to be phobic about them.

what's usually missing is discussion of how to boost more natural immunity.

back to turmeric recipes...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 06:14:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm fond of adding turmeric to my cooking, so generally would eat it 2 - 3 times a week. Didn't help

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:17:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Turmeric is badly absorbed so it depends what you eat it with.  You need an oily substance to absorb it better like cow or coconut milk or olive oil.  Black pepper also increases its bioavailability.

Beware though -  turmeric thinks the blood and too much for a long time may not be so good for your health.  I noticed very easy bruising after only a week of 1 tbsp 2 times per day with milk.  

by stevesim on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 08:47:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
hmm thanks for the hints. I've been having a teaspoonful every morning for the past couple of weeks, but I've found it moderately revolting mixed with milk or fruit juice. I might try it with olive oil on bread, sounds quite good.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 09:03:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
be careful though as once it is absorbed, it really does thin the blood, so not too much.
by stevesim on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:35:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thanks for the heads-up stevesim. For probably the last six months now I've been putting a healthy dose of turmeric into an herb tea I mix up and drink almost every day and I'd not heard of the blood thinning problem before. Appreciate the information.
by sgr2 on Wed Feb 27th, 2013 at 05:27:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
might have been worse without it!


"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 09:22:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One known way to interdict development of novel pathogenic viruses is to stop raising hogs and chickens in CAFO.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 01:18:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fewer CAFOs would be good for everyone.


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sapere aude
by Number 6 on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 at 05:58:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ever since I learnt about confirmation bias I've started seeing it everywhere

Beautiful!


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Tue Feb 26th, 2013 at 05:58:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Don't you mean "germs"?
Those are the ones you have to watch out for.

-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:05:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Microbes too.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:46:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The word "germ" is usually meant to convey the meaning of "disease causing."  At last count there were eleventy-bazillion different strains of bacteria on the planet, 99.99999% of which either have no effect on human health or are necessary for human health, e.g. gut bacteria.  There are a whole bunch of viruses, as well, and most of them are unable to affect the human body.

Out of the total number of viruses and bacteria only a relatively handful are able to enter the body and only a relatively small handful of those are anything more than a annoying hassle.  

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 01:15:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Perhaps crop plants are particularly susceptible to virii, losing their robustness through artificial selection.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:56:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The equivalent in animals is pure breed dogs, some of which literally cannot breed.

So, yes.


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sapere aude

by Number 6 on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:07:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Telegraph
Over-65s who were taught to use the website performed 25 per cent better in memory tests after posting daily updates for an eight week period.
In contrast people who kept an online diary with no "sharing" element, or who did not use either website, saw no improvement during the same time frame.
But there are risks.
A 19-year-old woman in Phoenix who accidentally shot and killed her brother was posing with a gun for Facebook photos, according to local police.
by gk (g k quattro due due sette "at" gmail.com) on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 07:58:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 11:51:00 AM EST
Depardieu moves into Russian town - The Local

Flamboyant French actor Gérard Depardieu on Saturday formally registered as a resident of the Russian region of Mordovia.

Newly-minted Russian citizen Depardieu gave his residence as No. 1, Democracy Street.

In a grand ceremony in Mordovia's main city of Saransk that bore little relation to the average Russian's experience of local bureaucracy, Depardieu signed a form and had his passport stamped to formally become a resident.

The procedure was greeted by wild applause by the crowds crammed into the city's state theatre to witness the procedure as the burly French megastar grinned broadly.

"Glory to Saransk, Glory to Mordovia, Glory to Russia!" he bellowed in celebration, in heavily-accented Russian.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Feb 24th, 2013 at 04:01:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]

The Sierpinski kite handled by the Hutchinson brothers.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Feb 25th, 2013 at 04:42:45 AM EST
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