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Friday Open Thread

by In Wales Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 11:11:27 AM EST

Let the weekend roll in


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What to do to shake off the end of the winter blues on a weekend?
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 11:12:33 AM EST
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 11:24:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oooooh, pork products

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 12:32:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Neat. "Offally good."

If I ever do all those blacksmithing courses I'm thinking of, some butchery would be next.


-----
sapere aude

by Number 6 on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 12:43:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The weather is so "offal" here (North winds, sleet, rain, for weeks on end) that the land looks like an oil slick. Two 200-kg porkers are getting the last cigarette and drink of rum tomorrow morning out there. I'm not looking forward to it.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 02:25:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What, you think they are?

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 04:00:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They like cigarettes and booze.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 04:25:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
US High tech companies moving to London.

In recent decades, the King's Cross neighborhood in central London was known as one of the city's sketchiest areas: full of prostitutes, drug dealers, and other seedy elements. These days, the former railyard site--just steps from one of London's major local, national, and international transit hubs--is rapidly being transformed into a major mixed-use commercial, residential, and academic zone.

No mention of a pub serving real ale.

;-)

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 12:06:46 PM EST
Don't worry, I know a few. Nothing great (you have to go up the road to Euston for that) but adequate

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 12:23:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
OK, but you could start a pub and rake in all that money.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot
by ATinNM on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 12:39:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You can't make money in a pub you rent, and property in that area is off that scale

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 12:56:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In other words, the economy doesn't serve entrepreneurs, it serves rentiers.

(And since that's two FR words, the same remark would be true of France).

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 02:31:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The british economy has always prioritized rentiers. Entrepreneurs are allowed only if they're rich enough to evade them

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 02:38:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the problem with the French is they don't have a word for "entrepreneur"
by stevesim on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 03:31:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, but they apparently have one for "rentier".
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 03:32:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not a great area for one anyway -- or at least didn't seem to be in my time wandering around.  It's messy and commercial.  Doesn't lend itself to the local pub feel, unless you're going for the lunch crowd.  The south side and the parts of the north (Archway, etc) seem much better.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 06:32:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
...adding: Granted, this may have changed entirely with the whole redesign of St Pancras and all the gutting of the surroundings that went on.  My view is admittedly six years old.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 06:36:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]

i think he's trying to figure out how to get to the sap...

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 01:41:49 PM EST
If that's Intelligent Design™, I want some of what the Designer's smoking.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 02:28:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
She was excited about this version, but couldn't exactly figure out how to respond to the bass line.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 02:36:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You were questioning somewhere somewhen regarding the lack of OT response and shit, lately and shit (and was it the new system?).

Me don't keine Ahnung have, but will say i already had to upgive making somewhat intelligent responses to brilliant diaries on political, economic and social thoughts digital because there no time was. Then it got worse.

Doesn't mean i lost contact with mission control, might possibly mean i'm whelmed over.

With Light in My Head, and You In My Arms...

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 02:50:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
someone has been speaking too much German.
by stevesim on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 03:31:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
good stuff

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 03:44:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well i checked out the OTs from since the change and people had more to say than recently i guess, so it's prolly random, unless there is an unconscious factor, possibly explainable by the fact that OT's are no longer as in-yer-mug as before, requiring a minimal-but-extant amount of burrowing now.

we've had similar phases of silentish vespers here before, so no worries.

it would be interesting to see site stats about stuff like this, like which days pattern out to be more loquacious.

geekerama!

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 04:45:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Q&A with Matt Taibbi

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 02:43:53 PM EST
Reddit has a tremendous number of AMAs with famous and semi-famous folks. Sometimes they're interesting. A lot of the time it's just PR and jokes to promote a show or movie but it's an ok format for someone like Tiabbi who is liable to say something interesting or offer his actual opinions.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 08:33:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
someone told me today, and many people agreed, that the EU was meant to put the Germans in control of Europe, so that they wouldn't start another war.
by stevesim on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 03:32:37 PM EST
well, they are serious.

the rest of us are just to help them lighten up maybe...

but if any other country is gonna run things, i can't think right now who it's going to be!

i do think their brains work better. they have a better education system than most, and they eat more whole grains and seeds than other europeans, which gives them the vitamin E-dge.

alles wird in ordnung sein, sehr gemutlich, ja? vorsprung durch teknik...

there's a reason royal families have always periodically stirred some teuton genes into their pool.

disclaimer- i have an german ancestor with the folkloric name of holzapfel. wooden apple.

highly un-pc i know, but i mean no harm. geolocation has an interesting rapport with personality. and all cultures deserve respect -if not reverence! being a mix breed myself i under-identify with nationalism in theory and practice. all human beans in this tortilla.

"We can all be prosperous but we can't all be rich." Ian Welsh

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 05:10:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ganz genau, all human beans in this tortilla.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 05:35:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
heh, or enable them to do just that without an army.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 08:34:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was at the yearly EWEA conference this week (in Vienna). Useful for work, but this year was clearly smaller, less crowded and gloomier than previous events.

2012 statistics are out and are pretty good, but there are big worries for the next two years.

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 05:53:03 PM EST
Please let me add, that the big worries for the next two years are already apparent in the decimation of the supply chain. At best, this will mean higher costs even in the cream scenarios of the next two years.

I'm no longer sure how, but i'm betting on us to win. Against all odds, but this won't be easy. Despite WPD financial close.

But please, do not underestimate the damage already done. Besides bankruptcy, the re-establishment of production lines will not be simple... especially at the same quality level.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 06:26:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Further, the erosion of financial security has taken a serious toll on the industry. Particularly in Spain and Portugal, but even in Germany. Eastern Europe waxes and wanes, as changes increase uncertainty.

Where is France, despite the new laws? And the UK is simply dangerously mad.

According to Fatih Birol at IEA, 2011 saw $523 B in fossil subsidies against $88 B for renewables, globally. (Note that doesn't include nuclear.)

Why the industry is sitting on its ass instead of actively propounding in public is beyond my limited cognitive abilities.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sat Feb 9th, 2013 at 04:21:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Where is France, despite the new laws?

Waiting for finance. There is this idiocy about the feed-in tariff which had been judged to need EU approval which is still pending, and the ministers keep saying "It's OK, the tariffs are perfectly secure and guaranteed", and the bankers aren't believing them.

So it takes you 8 years in France to build a wind farm from scratch, IF you can get the finance.

Perhaps Jerome's outfit needs to come onshore and shake 'em up?

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sun Feb 10th, 2013 at 07:29:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My favorite joke to Jérôme is that he apparently can't be a prophet in his own country. It would be funny it it weren't so sad.
by Bernard on Sun Feb 10th, 2013 at 02:40:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It would indeed be funny it it were't so sad. alternatively, it would indeed be criminal, that it was so true. thanks for the pointers.


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - AnaÔs Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Feb 10th, 2013 at 02:52:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Era of Fast Growth Ends for Wind Energy in Europe - SPIEGEL ONLINE
The debt crisis is finally catching up with wind energy, once a fast-growing sector in Europe. After more than a decade of double-digit growth, austerity, rapidly changing energy policies and skittish investors are putting a damper on the industry.

It is often the elephant in the room at any conference on renewable energy. Sometimes, it's mentioned simply as the "s" word and other times it's not mentioned at all. But subsidies remain crucial, with wind energy still struggling to achieve price parity with coal and natural gas. This week in Vienna, at the European Wind Energy Association's annual conference, subsidies came up right away.

OAS_RICH('Middle2'); This time, it was the source of the comments that was unexpected. During the opening keynote, Fatih Birol, the chief economist at the International Energy Agency, proclaimed fossil fuel subsidies to be the "Public Enemy No. 1" of sustainable energy developments. This, from a man who just eight short years ago was urging "substantial" increases in new oil and gas drilling investments.

His argument was simple. Renewable energies right now are suffering from a dual problem: Governments around the world are slashing aid for clean energy, and massive subsidies propping up the fossil fuel industry are making it impossible to compete with the cheaper energy.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Feb 9th, 2013 at 06:34:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Much to say.

Too brain-fried to be able to say it coherently.

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Fri Feb 8th, 2013 at 07:05:58 PM EST
What a snob. Absolutely no understanding that 95% of classical is hack written nonsense hiding behind the 5% of genuinely inspirational and claiming kinship just cos it's played by the same penguins on the same instruments.

classical's biggest problem is the expense. Orchestra's cost an awful lot of money and, given modern technology, are retained as a deliberate barrier to entry.

Pop musicians address their audience "hello Scunthorpe, rock and rock capital of the universe". Classical people turn their back, as if communicating is just a bit beneath them

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Feb 9th, 2013 at 07:56:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
95% of classical is hack written nonsense

And how does that differ from Rock, Reggae, Trance, Punk, Country, Folk, Jazz, & all down the list of genres?  

Pop musicians address their audience ... Classical people turn their back

Orchestral musicians have to be able to see their sheet music and the conductor.  For conductor-less groups they have to concentrate on the other players, following what they are doing so they can respond.  Or not.  Soloists can and do face the audience as they have memorized their part.  

classical's biggest problem is the expense.
 

Here I agree.  Top symphonic orchestras get some Public Money but they get a lot more from recordings, live broadcasts, and movie work.  Outside of major urban areas it's hard to find a large enough customer base.    

Skepticism is the first step on the road to truth. -- Denis Diderot

by ATinNM on Sat Feb 9th, 2013 at 12:47:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not the expense, it's the lack of income.

Performing with an orchestra isn't any more expensive than performing with a full pop rig and top session musicians. It can be considerably cheaper.

But ticket prices are lower (expect for opera) and venues are likely to be smaller.

Also, conductors keep most of the income. Musicians get relatively little. Composers don't necessarily get much either - although someone like John Adams will be doing fine financially.

Minimalism is at the pop end of classical anyway. If you want small audiences, try touring a program of Berg, Webern, and Boulez.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Feb 9th, 2013 at 07:44:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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