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600 new hacking victims from NOTW

by ceebs Sat Mar 16th, 2013 at 12:31:43 PM EST

Yesterday we had several senior members of the UK's Mirror Group arrested, former editors and deputies from one of the papers, including the person who was Piers Morgan's deputy. In the corner of the article was the mention that the supergrass involved was someone who had worked for both the Mirror Group and the News of the World.

And tonight some of what is being investigated was revealed:

Phone hacking: Rupert Murdoch hit by 600 fresh claims | UK news | The Guardian

Detectives are examining an estimated 600 fresh allegations of phone-hacking incidents at Rupert Murdoch's now closed News of the World on the back of fresh evidence obtained by the Metropolitan police from a suspect turned supergrass.

Further details are expected to emerge on Monday morning at the high court during a hearing relating to the existing litigation by hacking victims against Murdoch's News International (NI) - hours before MPs are due to vote on joint Labour and Liberal Democrat amendments that would introduce a backstop law to stiffen regulation of the press.

Sources say Scotland Yard detectives believe they can identify as many as 600 new incidents after obtaining the phone records of an insider who is now being lined up as a crown witness. As a result of the new information, the force's Operation Weeting is recalibrating the timetable for concluding its investigation, which had been due to be completed with the conclusion of trials this year. Police now expect their work to continue into 2015.


On top of this another Mirror Group editor has been interviewed today under caution. It may be down to him being married to one of yesterday's arestees, but if not, that means that we may be now possibly talking about four UK newspapers involved in phone hacking.

Monday is shaping up to be very interesting. A televised Parliament session which could conceivably result in the collapse of the current UK government as the coalition partners end up in bloody battle over the press regulation rules. And at the same time there are court hearings for at least 12 of the current 167 civil court cases where they have agreed to settle.

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So long as the sticky hands of justice begin to grip around Murdoch and Morgan's ankles, I'll be happy.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Mar 16th, 2013 at 01:42:22 PM EST
They do appear to be getting close to one

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Mar 16th, 2013 at 03:02:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I thought there was a chance of that when the rumor was that he had done something bad with the U.S. military people, but that seems to have blown over...
by asdf on Wed Apr 10th, 2013 at 04:10:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
collapse of the current UK government

Wishful thinking I'm afraid. The Limpdems must surely be the most principled party on earth -- they keep locating important principles that they haven't betrayed yet, and promptly betray them. I expect they'll find a way of backing down on press regulation next week.

And even if they don't -- there's no reason it should be a coalition-breaker. Cameron has already declared that if he loses the vote in the Commons, he will "accept the sovereignty of Parliament". Mighty big of him, when you think about it.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Sat Mar 16th, 2013 at 05:39:13 PM EST
Well - yes and no.

The issue is that Cameron is Murdoch's man. But his position in the party is precarious, so it's perfectly possible he'll be thrown under the bus and replaced by some horrible twitching winger in an attempt to forestall a Murdoch-sponsored UKIP slaughter of the Tory vote in the next elections.

It's a four-way punch up between a few honest police, a corrupt establishment with some very nasty secrets, a parliament full of political chancers on the make, and Murdoch with an alleged collection of 'interesting' journalism about all of he above.

There's worse to come. My guess is the secrets are probably going to come out anyway, and they may change the game in a truly historical way.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 01:21:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Can the parliament simply appoint PM horrible twitching winger or is a new election necessary with Mr horrible twitching winger as the party leader for the Tories?

The situation reminds me of Italy during the Mani Pulite. But Murdoch is Australian right, so he could not do a Berlusconi and run his own party right? And besides his attempt at buying a football club failed, IIRC.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 04:20:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Parties can change leaders at any time without an election. See e.g Major taking over from Thatcher or Brown taking over from Blair.

Murdoch doesn't need his own party, since effectively he owns them all.

The only possible political game changer is a Grillo-esque none-of-the-above party built from the bottom up. But that needs a charismatic and persuasive leader, and as yet there aren't any here.

So UKIP is collecting the anti-coalition protest vote on the right, and Nu Nu Labour are picking up the traditional left-leaning voters.

UKIP's Farage - one of the chancers - has already been to see Murdoch about a possible Tory/UKIP coalition at the next election.

That's an impossibility right now, if only because the Tories look down on UKIP as peasant oiks.

But it's perhaps not so unlikely if the Tories kick out Cameron and drift further right with someone like Gove at the head.

Basically UKIP could easily take over from the LibDems, collecting the protest votes and then stabbing their supporters in the back in exchange for power.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 06:14:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why you don't have a political/social column, I don't know - or maybe you have? You have the knack of brutal summarization.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 04:37:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
hear hear, though brutal is a bit strong.

dispassionate perceptions, elegantly (and wryly) expressed.

in one word, lucid.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 05:48:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I mean brutal in the sense, antagonistically, of not beating about the bush.  Lucid is a good word, but it doesn't quite encapsulate the full power of a TBG broadside.

But, as Zen advises us: "when you understand, you can leave the words behind."

I'm sort of demi-zen: half here and half somewhere else.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 06:23:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If anything's gonna happen to Cameron this won't be the trigger. Bowing to the desires of Murdoch, even if it's a losing position, is hardly an offense in the Tory party (it's barely one in Labour either).

The May elections will be where it all comes together. Eastleigh was the crack in the dam, but if there's a collapse of the tory vote at the local elections in May, especially towards UKIP, then the knives will really be out for Cameron.

Which will make for an entertaining summer.

I hope some grubby secrets about the elites start coming out, but the Establishment have been hiding their filth for decades and I'm not holding my breath on that one.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 04:50:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
eurogreen:
The Limpdems must surely be the most principled party on earth -- they keep locating important principles that they haven't betrayed yet, and promptly betray them.

whenever i read how people want grillo to cosy up to the PD i think of the libdems and hope he stands strong.

if beppe was clegg he'd be ready to bunga bunga with silvio.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 05:52:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fortunately, Labour has used this period of LibDem/Conservative difficulty to fashion a clear, forward-looking electoral strategy, formulate progressive economic and social policies, and identify and promote a new generation of leadership that will be able to take the UK forward after the current setup collapses.

One would wish...

by asdf on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 12:11:48 PM EST
Can I have some of those drugs please ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 12:22:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Drugs? statements like the first part of that come with a jacket that ties up at the back

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 02:41:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The drugs don't work, they just make it worse...

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Sun Mar 17th, 2013 at 04:13:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Press regulation deal hailed by Labour after last-ditch talks | Media | guardian.co.uk

It appears, according to a No 10 source, that Labour has conceded on the ownership of the press code committee and on the idea of a general purpose clause that would allow the recognition committee to rule that the regulator had failed. There had been concerns that newspapers were going to be able to write their own press code, even if it was to be interpreted by a regulator largely consisting of non-newspaper representatives.

The Conservatives have conceded ground by accepting that apologies can be directed by the regulator rather than just required - seen by lawyers as a substantive difference.

If I'm reading this correctly, the press is going to be allowed to write its own regulations.

Thank you Nu Labour Lite.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Mar 18th, 2013 at 07:06:05 AM EST
it sounds from further news this morning that Cameron has caved in, although he's trying to declare victory

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 18th, 2013 at 07:24:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Labour MP given 'substantial damages' after Sun accessed text messages | Media | guardian.co.uk

The Labour MP Siobhain McDonagh has accepted "very substantial damages" from News International, with the Sun admitting that it accessed text messages from her mobile phone after it was stolen, the high court has heard.

Details of the payout to McDonagh came on at a high court case management hearing relating to civil damages claims for voicemail interception on Monday, which heard that "hundreds" more victims may now take action against News International following allegations of a second significant phone-hacking operation at the now defunct News of the World.

The Sun, which was not accused of stealing McDonagh's phone, admitted that there was "serious wrongdoing and misuse of her private information and her mobile phone" and agreed to pay her damages and legal costs.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 18th, 2013 at 09:19:10 AM EST
Liberal Conspiracy - Why it's significant the Sun admits hacking a Labour MP's stolen phone

This story is important because the Sun editor in 2010, when they accessed text messages from a stolen phone, was Dominic Mohan.

He is still the Sun editor.

Rupert Murdoch on 26/4/12

"editors are all responsible for their papers. I certainly hold them..for that."

So, should he not face the consequences ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Mar 18th, 2013 at 10:42:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"editors are all responsible for their papers. I certainly hold them..for that." - RM

He is just saying "The buck stops there!"

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Mar 18th, 2013 at 08:18:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well I'm amazed he hasn't been interviewed yet. you would thinkat some point he has financial sign off on payments to officials, it'll have been Ok'ed by someone up the command chain, and he's signed to say that department accounts are OK, and those include all those illegal payments

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 18th, 2013 at 09:56:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You just can't get reliable help these days.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Mar 19th, 2013 at 01:06:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, but he is reliable. He'll take the fall for his boss, which is all Murdoch needs in an editor

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Mar 19th, 2013 at 03:54:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
one of the reasons it has been suggested that Rebekah might be the Supergrass

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Mar 19th, 2013 at 03:30:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hooo wow, that'd also hurt David, her horse sitter. He's bet the bank on Rupert winning everything.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Mar 19th, 2013 at 03:54:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Former boxer Chris Eubank promises 'gargantuan battle' over phone hacking - Press - Media - The Independent

Retired boxer Chris Eubank told the High Court today that he was looking forward to a "gargantuan battle" in the phone-hacking litigation.

The former world champion took the ring at the 14th case management conference before Mr Justice Vos in London to say that he was not accepting a "derisory offer" of £21,000 to settle his case.

Reading from notes in a room packed with around 100 lawyers and media, he said that the newspaper group had "made a mockery of the justice system here in the UK".



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 18th, 2013 at 10:24:49 AM EST


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