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Corporate Censorship

by Frank Schnittger Wed Jul 24th, 2013 at 10:04:51 AM EST

I have a letter published in today's Irish independent (Irelands largest selling daily newspaper). Unfortunately they left out most of the substance of the letter leaving only a slightly repetitive rump...
Save lives by making swimming safe - Independent.ie

* Twelve people have drowned whilst swimming in Ireland this past month - about as many as die on our roads in an average month. Telling people not to swim on our rare days of hot summer weather is akin to telling them not to use the roads. It might save some lives, but it is hardly realistic or practical advice.

So what is to be done? Ireland is almost alone in the world in not designating certain areas in every county as safe swimming areas and not employing lifeguards to help assure their safety.

Let's stop wringing our hands about the drownings and start doing something practical to prevent even more. Let's designate safe swimming areas in every county and employ lifeguards to make them even safer.

Frank Schnittger

The middle (unpublished) section of the letter read as follows:


On the contrary commercial organisations like the ESB are doing their utmost to chase people away from safe swimming areas like those at Lacken on Blessington lake thereby making it more likely that people will swim and drown in much less safe parts of the lake.

Anywhere else in Europe, lakes and reservoirs like Blessington lake would be the most prized and valuable swimming amenities in in the country, with public beaches, lifeguards  and beach cleaning services. Here the ESB employs staff to chase away anyone who is not a paid up member of a sailing, windsurfing or adventure club with their own public liability insurance. Indeed the ESB is busy destroying and locking up public car parks and barring rights of way to prevent legitimate rights of access to the lake.

Whilst some may object that the lake is primarily intended as a water source for Dublin and a power source for the national grid it must be remembered that the land on which it is located was acquired by compulsory purchase orders at extremely cheap rates from the people of the locality. It's current owners therefor have a duty to make it available as a community amenity and indeed to provide bins, bin collection and lifeguard services during the peak summer months.

Clearly no criticism of state owned commercial enterprises like the Electricity Supply Board (ESB) is allowed. Whilst gaining the benefit of an enormous public resource, the ESB doesn't see itself as having any public responsibilities in return. They won't even keep the place clean or provide a basic rubbish collection service. Understandably they see their basic remit as being to produce power from the Dam at Poulaphouca. Despite being located in County Wicklow, the water is basically owned and controlled by Dublin Corporation for use by Dublin City. Nothing wrong with that, but then who has the responsibility to maintain the resource as a local and tourist amenity?

Blessington lake is one of the most beautiful in Ireland, and could be the basis of a thriving tourist industry as well as providing a better amenity to locals:




Poulaphouca Dam

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I have sent the following follow-up letter to the Irish Independent:

Dear Sir,

I sent you a 360 word letter on making swimming safer in Ireland and you kindly published 127 of them or about one third of the letter. Unfortunately you left out the most important two thirds of the letter which gave a concrete example of how the ESB could make Blessington lake much safer. Is criticism of the ESB not allowed in your paper even when it might save lives?

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Thu Jul 25th, 2013 at 09:16:33 AM EST
It's not censorship it's "editorial oversight"

It's current owners therefor

...and, perhaps, the language police ;-)

by mustakissa on Sat Jul 27th, 2013 at 03:13:32 AM EST
Many thanks for the English lesson. I tend to use the two spellings interchangeably unaware that they are supposed to be two distinct words.

orthography - What is the difference between therefor and therefore? - English Language & Usage Stack Exchange

I'm a non-native English speaker, and my automatic spellchecker seems to accept both therefore and therefor. Is one orthography preferred ? Is that a British vs. American difference ? Or an old vs. more recent orthography ? Or something else ?

Therefor means for that.

For example:

Here we sell guitars and accessories therefor.

Therefor is one of a whole series of adverbs: thereof (of that), thereafter(after that), therein (in there), etc.

If you are familiar with German - the Germanic sister of English - you can find a direct analogy there:

for = für

therefor, for that = dafür (literally, therefor)

Therefore, as you must know, means as a (logical) consequence

Therefore and therefor are completely different words.

Therefor, an archaic word, means "for this", "for that", or "for it". E.g;

... ordering goods and enclosing payment therefor.

Therefore means "for that reason" or "hence".E.g;

Those people have their umbrellas up: therefore, it must be raining



Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Sat Jul 27th, 2013 at 07:26:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Therefor is seriously archaic.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Jul 27th, 2013 at 07:42:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
regrettably so, they are fine, intuitive, expressive words!

thereafter, whither, and whom all bound similarly for extinction. de gustibus vulgaris...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2013 at 10:16:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Therefore I must be becoming seriously archaic, because I use these words all the time. Hereinafter I shall  continue to use them regardless of whither they are going, whether they disappear from popular discourse, or by whom their use is discontinued. Whereas popular usage has some utility, it does not always capture my precise meaning or intent.  Heretofore I might have been inclined towards modern usage, not being an English, Languages, or fine arts student, and I oft find their utterings pretentious if not tendentious. My old English teacher proclaimed that there were three great sources of the English language - Shakespeare, the King James Bible and GOD (Greater Oxford Dictionary). Blogging, texting, tweeting and 1984 style PR speak may soon take their place, but not always for the better. I must be getting old...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Jul 30th, 2013 at 11:56:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Forsooth.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2013 at 12:05:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Verily, you flatter me not...

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Jul 30th, 2013 at 12:10:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
keep the sputtering flame alive frank!

semantic archivism rulz

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2013 at 12:44:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Jul 30th, 2013 at 12:53:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
distinction or difference?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Jul 30th, 2013 at 08:14:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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