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The left alternative to the FN

by r------ Thu May 14th, 2015 at 02:31:41 AM EST

T


Problem.

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and especially for the french speakers amongst you: the very first paragraph. In my view, the press release does not need this paragraph, in fact taken out, the release, on the rest on the content, is clearer. So, the fact that the release includes it, indeed headlines with it, is telling us something.

And in my opinion, it is to open up; the folks looking for representation, and who are flocking today in droves to BBM, don't give a shit if you call yourself left or right. They just want representation.

And they are not getting it.

I'd also add that M'PEP doesn't even address EELV, and this is pretty much by design, as it is a European and not a French party. My own view, is that EELV occupies the same practical/ideological space as the PCF in the PS electoral strategy: EELV provides the environmental bona fides, PCF the "red" bona fides, to allow the PS to rake in the votes from people with one or the other (or both) sensibilities.

The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill

by r------ on Thu May 14th, 2015 at 02:40:49 AM EST
M'PEP keeps such a low profile that if you ask google about it you get links about Pep Guardiola.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 14th, 2015 at 05:35:32 AM EST


The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill
by r------ on Thu May 14th, 2015 at 05:37:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Labour's rebirth requires a grassroots revolution, not more diktats and spin | George Monbiot | Comment is free | The Guardian

Leadership comes from below: that's what most successful progressive parties have in common. Leftwing parties have triumphed where politics has been reshaped by powerful social movements, and failed where they rely on passive support. The late 20th-century model - of speeches, spin and central diktats - is a dud.

No progressive party can survive the corporate press, corrupt party funding systems and conservative fear machines by fighting these forces on their own terms. The left can build only from the ground up, reshaping itself through the revitalisation of communities, working with local people to help fill the gaps in social provision left by an uncaring elite. A successful progressive movement must now be Citizens Advice bureau, housing association, scout troop, trade union, credit union, bingo hall, food bank, careworker, football club and evangelical church, rolled into one. Focus groups and spin doctors no longer deliver.

This is the lesson from Latin America, where many of the progressive victories of the past 20 years have been won. They arose not from short-term electoral strategies, let alone from friendly overtures to media barons and banks, but from citizens' movements that began, in some cases, 50 years ago. These movements have had plenty of setbacks and disappointments. But they have locked in change of the kind that once seemed impossible.

by Bjinse on Thu May 14th, 2015 at 10:15:41 AM EST
A grassroots revolution will ditch Labour, not rebirth it.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu May 14th, 2015 at 10:40:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Quite possibly. They should count me in, in any case.

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi
by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Thu May 14th, 2015 at 03:45:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, the two strategies are to try to build within Labour and force Labour to either allow itself be taken over or kick the grassroots revolution out, or else to build outside from the outset.

From the other side of the Eurasian continent, unless the Co-operative party machinery could be taken over, it does not seem like there is any place within Labour where a grassroots revolution could be built without being immediately swamped by Labour being Labour over the next election cycle.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Thu May 14th, 2015 at 07:42:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Nothing in this text to quarrel about. But given that I know next to nothing about M'PEP it tells me little except that the Vichy left keeps disintegrating. Will this amount to anything? They don't even have an English Wiki page.
by generic on Fri May 15th, 2015 at 05:11:26 AM EST
It s pretty sad that the only alternative to the FN is this ;-)

And as Marine Lepen often pointed out, it defeats the purpose to encourage immigration / free movement of people in Europe ( which both are encouraged by large businesses/governments to pressure blue collar's salary) while at the same time claiming protecting these blue collar/population from this race to the bottom.

It s not going to be pretty in France, democracy is dying fast there, a huge clean up is to be expected.

by fredouil (fredouil@gmailgmailgmail.com) on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 09:19:47 AM EST
Cécile Duflot replies to Jean-Luc Mélenchon:

L'Allemagne n'est pas notre ennemie - Libération  Germany is not our enemy - Libération
Tu es un animal politique trop doué et un intellectuel trop avisé pour que je ne me dise pas que le ton employé relève d'une stratégie de conquête des coeurs. En mettant ta critique de l'Allemagne au diapason de la nostalgie identitaire, tu penses, peut-être de bonne foi, détourner la colère populaire des sirènes national-populistes. Il n'en sera rien. Mettre le doigt dans cet engrenage sémantique, c'est se préparer à avoir bientôt tout le corps entraîné dans la germanophobie la plus élémentaire. Tu te défends de cette critique en renvoyant, par avance, tous ceux qui seraient choqués par tes propos dans le camp des tenants du système.You're a way too skilled political animal and such a well advised intellectual that I can't help thinking that the tone employed is akin to a strategy of "conquest of the hearts". By putting your criticism of Germany in tune with identity nostalgia, you think, maybe in good faith, to turn the popular anger from the sirens of National-populism. It won't happen. Putting a finger in this semantics spiral, is looking at having soon your whole body dragged into the most primary Germanophobia. You are fending this criticism off, by referring, in advance, all those who would be shocked by your words to the camp of the system proponents.

Mélenchon recently published a pamphlet, Le hareng de Bismarck (Bismarck's herring), a virulent critique of Germany.
by Bernard on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 04:54:15 PM EST
"Bismarck's herring"

So his problems are culinary?

by IM on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 06:13:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, it's well known that French people like culinary based metaphors just like USians like gun based metaphors.

It that case, I understand the book's title is referring to last year's visit of F.Hollande to A.Merkel.

by Bernard on Thu May 21st, 2015 at 04:46:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Seems to ne a purely french debate. So "Germany" seems to be just a metaphor.

Is it true that he accuses Germany of militarism?

Funny.

by IM on Wed May 20th, 2015 at 06:47:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Here's the blurb supplied by his publisher:

Ouvrage | Plon Jean-Luc MELENCHON  Books | Plon Jean-Luc MELENCHON
Le « poison allemand » est celui que la politique du gouvernement Merkel diffuse dans l'économie de ses voisins. Un poison asphyxiant qui condamne ceux-ci à la misère, au chaos social et politique. Dans ce pamphlet, Jean-Luc Mélenchon appelle à assumer une confrontation franche des points de vue avec l'Allemagne actuelle pour stopper la marche au chaos en cours.
  The « German poison » is the one that Merkel's government policy is diffusing into the economy of its neighbors. An asphyxiating poison that condemns them to poverty, social and political chaos. In this pamphlet, Jean-Luc Mélenchon calls to a frank confrontation of views with today's Germany to stop the ongoing march to chaos.
Ceci est un pamphlet. Mon but est de percer le blindage des béatitudes de tant de commentateurs fascinés par l'Allemagne.
Je prends la plume pour alerter : un monstre est né sous yeux, l'enfant de la finance dérégulée et d'un pays qui s'est voué à elle, nécrosé par le vieillissement accéléré de sa population. L'un ne serait rien sans l'autre.
Cette alliance est en train de remodeler l'Europe à sa main. Dès lors, l'Allemagne est, de nouveau, un danger. Le modèle qu'elle impose est, une fois de plus, un recul pour notre civilisation.
Ce poison allemand est l'opium des riches. Changer la donne politique et faire changer l'Allemagne sont devenus une seule et même chose. Il faut le faire avant qu'il ne soit trop tard.
 This is a pamphlet. My goal is to pierce the armor of bliss of so many commentators fascinated by Germany.
I'm taking up my pen to alert: a monster is born under your eyes, the child of deregulated finance and a country that has committed to it, necrotic by the accelerated aging of its population. One would be nothing without the other.
This alliance is reshaping Europe under its thumb. From then on, Germany is once again a threat. The model it is imposing is, once again, a step backwards for civilization.
This German poison is the opium of the rich. Change the political landscape and make Germany change have become one and the same. This must be done before it is too late.

Le Monde has run a "fact-checking" exercise on his main claims: polluters, bee killers, etc... but militarism isn't on that list (and I haven't seen that particular claim on any of the coverage I've seen).

by Bernard on Thu May 21st, 2015 at 05:03:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I did read in the WELT that there was a chapter on militarism.

Whatever, Germany is just a symbol:

" My goal is to pierce the armor of bliss of so many commentators fascinated by Germany. "

by IM on Sun May 24th, 2015 at 05:24:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
However much the general argument may risk an unwarranted conflation of the German policy to commit to the neoliberal agenda with "Germany" as such, reading this passage:

"the child of deregulated finance and a country that has committed to it"

... the only substantial sin in this particular passage would appear to be accuracy.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue May 26th, 2015 at 01:29:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The financial sector in Germany is not as deregulated as in Britain or the USA, nor moving in that direction now AFAIK. I think the main goal in Europe is not further financial deregulation but labour market deregulation, privatisation and the regulation of the public sector (speak: put it into a straitjacket).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Jun 6th, 2015 at 02:47:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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