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Open Thread 18 - 24 Sep

by Bjinse Mon Sep 18th, 2017 at 07:36:25 PM EST

The need for threads is greater than the need for answers


Display:
With a Picked Lock and a Threatened Indictment, Mueller's Inquiry Sets a Tone - The New York Times
Mr. Mueller has obtained a flurry of subpoenas to compel witnesses to testify before a grand jury, lawyers and witnesses say, sometimes before his prosecutors have taken the customary first step of interviewing them.

Being compelled to show up in front of a court before being interviewed? Oh my, I have heard that is unpossible in anglosaxon jurisdictions. I do hope they flee that country and camp out in an embassy somewhere else. </snark>

With the snark out of the way, here is the parts I think is relevant.

Tactics:
With a Picked Lock and a Threatened Indictment, Mueller's Inquiry Sets a Tone - The New York Times

"They are setting a tone. It's important early on to strike terror in the hearts of people in Washington, or else you will be rolled," said Solomon L. Wisenberg, who was deputy independent counsel in the investigation that led to the impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1999. "You want people saying to themselves, `Man, I had better tell these guys the truth.'"

With a Picked Lock and a Threatened Indictment, Mueller's Inquiry Sets a Tone - The New York Times

"They seem to be pursuing this more aggressively, taking a much harder line, than you'd expect to see in a typical white-collar case," said Jimmy Gurulé, a Notre Dame law professor and former federal prosecutor. "This is more consistent with how you'd go after an organized crime syndicate."

Scope:
With a Picked Lock and a Threatened Indictment, Mueller's Inquiry Sets a Tone - The New York Times

[Mueller] appears to be taking a broad view of his mandate: examining not just the Russian disruption campaign and whether any of Mr. Trump's associates assisted in the effort, but also any financial entanglements with Russians going back several years. He is also investigating whether Mr. Trump tried to obstruct justice when he fired James B. Comey, the F.B.I. director.

While Trump showed clearly that he is willing to pardon just about anyone by pardoning Arpaio, the probability that Mueller will find some dirt through emails and bank accounts is extremely high even if Trump associates doesn't cast blame on their current or former boss. You don't get stinking rich by obeying the law.

by fjallstrom on Tue Sep 19th, 2017 at 01:31:43 PM EST
archived: top of the subthread. Sweden's prosecutors drop rape charge warranting arrest of J. Assange for alleged crime  investigated by prosecutors.

Being compelled to show up in front of a court before being interviewed?

"Here,it's impossible to jump bail unless you've already been arraigned on charges. Not so evidently in the UK or Sweden."

Here, a subpoena a/k/a "summons" is not a charge of a crime, or warrant for arrest. It is a command to appear enforced by penalty. Any attorney may request that a court issue to any party a subpoena for discovery and examination of evidence, documentary or oral testimony. Compliance with the writ may be before a court --OR-- not before a court as when attys for the parties in civil proceedings agree to conduct a deposition at any time before hearing by the court. The latter may be that procedure to which NY Yella Cake alludes by noting, prosecutors have NOT "taken the customary first step of interviewing them" --witnesses.

Now, here, rules of procedure for "interviewing," or examining, defendants and evidence in custody in a criminal proceeding are quite different than they are for civil proceedings or grand jury. First, the "suspect" isn't even present and may never learn what "information" a prosecutor presented to secure his or her arrest even a trial thereafter. This travesty of due process is a "star chamber". So, yeah, Trump may have something in common with J. Assange.

By fingering and intimidating potential "witnesses", Mueller is fishing for a high crime or misdemeanor to saddle Trump, because he's got nothing like wire taps he could use at trial. Also he's trying to roll the witnesses. That's obvious. NY Yella Cake as much concedes ineptly by characterizing his tactics as "polarizing".

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Tue Sep 19th, 2017 at 08:08:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
  1. What is the complaint that Mueller has filed with any court?

  2. What court compels any witness or defendant to violate a fifth amendment right, i.e. to incriminate him or herself?


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Tue Sep 19th, 2017 at 08:17:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
None of this will matter.  Trumpy will pardon EVERYONE, including HIMSELF, for everything including TREASON; it will all be kept hush-hush to keep public opinion out of it, and the Repub Congress will do NOTHING!  Move along. A TERRORIST organization has taken over the Fed. Govt. ... get used to it.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 08:12:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If he arranges for New York State or NJ to bring charges, there's no way for Trump to pardon them.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 08:43:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have an idea! (Oh no ... groan)  Let's have an ET pool.  I say 1 year from today, either the "investigation" will be continuing or it will be over and NO ONE will be charged with anything.  I've got a crisp Benjamin to burn ... anybody want in?  Payoff day will be 9/20/18.  Who's in?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 01:31:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
what's a Benjamin?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 06:17:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A special British 50p coin.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 06:27:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
errybuddy knows it is not a TUBMAN.

And so concludes today's lesson "Real Complementarity".

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 07:09:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
what's a Benjamin?

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 10:29:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]

This is GREAT!  Let the rest of the U.S. go to hell and California will finally wake up and wave BYE BYE.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 10:55:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Politics.co.uk - Ian Dunt - Boris' attack on young people is part of Brexit's 'traitor' narrative

Anyone who is remotely interesting is many things all at once. And they know, from an early age, that people will try to stop them being interesting.

The tedious only ever want you to be one thing. It starts early in life. They tell you to only like boy stuff or girl stuff. If you're a boy you have to like sport and cars and guns. If you're a girl you have to like dollshouses and pink dresses and princesses. Then when you're a teenager they ask you to chose again. You can be a goth, or you can be indie, or you can be into rugby (these are all categories from my youth, which are presumably completely out of date now, but the basic mechanism will be the same).

This goes on throughout your life, from the way you do work, to the people you date, to your posture, to your politics, to your hobbies. You are asked to be one thing, easily definable. Anthing else is confusing and upsets those with simple minds.

This is what Brexit is, in terms of national identity. It is the demand to be only one thing. Put aside all the technicalities and you'll find this sentiment at its heart.

Boris has decided that, if you do not support brexit, then you are against Britain.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Sep 19th, 2017 at 01:52:47 PM EST
Well - if Boris has decided anything, it's that he'd rather lead a rabble of no-hoper xenophobes who believe that being against Brexit is being against Britain, than serve as a minion in May's multi-dysfunctional riven "government."

In other words Boris has gone Trump, and is pandering to the deplorables in order to win the party leadership and - he hopes - an election.

The lying is part of the act. In the world of the deplorables, sticking a boot in the face of anyone who has real facts to discuss is considered a virtue, not a crime.

Boris doesn't care about facts. Boris only cares about Boris. And when you're on your way to the top, populist rhetoric always trumps (sic) truth.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Sep 19th, 2017 at 04:14:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The lying is part of the act. In the world of the deplorables, sticking a boot in the face of anyone who has real facts to discuss is considered a virtue, not a crime.

Yes, this.

A real 'rebel yell' for the fuddy-duddies on the back benches. Forget yer facts, vote for the most outrageous one if you're going to vote in a clown prince of terminal idiocy.

"Good ole Boris, watta wagster, did you hear the latest yet? He showed 'em up for the fact-ridden fools they are, eh."

Britain once again aping America, in Teresa May's case vying for the nastiest female leader with Hillary, while Boris tries to out-buffoon the Donald.

With leaders like this enemies don't have to lift a finger, just enjoy the meltdown.

Boris the historian, making hysteria against Johnny Foreigner great again.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 05:30:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, who can go down first and fastest, Brits or Euros?
Faites vos jeux...
Well dressed spivs to the left of me, jokers to the right.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 05:40:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sadistic Heian Aristocrat Responsible For Kanji With 16 Readings
A new study has revealed evidence linking a Heian aristocrat to the creation of sixteen readings for the 生 kanji.

Researchers discovered that the sadistic nobleman gained pleasure from other people's grief and wore all black because he believed it had a slimming effect.

The readings include `sho', `sei', `i'(kiru), `u'(mareru), `o'(u), `ha'(eru), `ki', `nama', `na'(ru), `mu'(su), and a few others that are not used in normal life.

"This recently unearthed depiction of the Heian aristocrat illustrates his method of sitting on a block of tatami while pondering the most outrageous reading combinations," writes one researcher.

The Rising Wasabi ~ The Onion

by das monde on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 02:30:28 AM EST
I think this product really exists.

Is there really no way to embed videos any more? Is this yet another example of Google being evil?

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 06:11:36 PM EST
Ben Elton wote a stage play about this in 1990, called Gasping.

I think that the last series of Dr Who extended the idea with the episode Oxygen

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 06:22:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Our IP server locations may differ. I can view the clip (USA, Mid-Atlantic, N. VA, AT&T pipe straight to NSA).

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 07:16:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is a very interesting essay on how the historic divisions within Germany have profound implications for the future of Europe. Question I have is: how close is this to on-the-ground reality?

New Statesman - James Hawes - What Britain needs to understand about the profound and ancient divisions in Germany

On 24 September, Angela Merkel will be re-elected chancellor of Germany and that, we might think, will be that. With Merkel and France's Emmanuel Macron in control of the European project, populism will surely be vanquished and the old Franco-German core of the EU restored. Yet things are changing, and if western Europe wants Germany to keep singing "Ode to Joy" as enthusiastically as "Deutschlandlied", it will have some work to do. Our Brexit negotiators need to see how important this is to Macron, to other European leaders and, above all, to thinking Germans.

For we may all soon miss the old, self-effacing Germany. Despite having such economic power, it always seemed to have no greater wish than to exist as part of a larger whole. Konrad Adenauer, its first postwar chancellor and founding father, made Westbindung ("binding to the West") the heart of West German politics. Adenauer came from the deeply Catholic Rhineland, "amid the vineyards" as he put it, "where Germany's windows are open to the West". His instinctive cultural sympathy was with France, but he knew that West Germany's existence depended on keeping America in Europe. France he courted out of profound conviction, the US out of clear-eyed necessity, and he was worried that after him this twin course might be abandoned. His demands for reassurance during his final year in office led to John F Kennedy's "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech of 1963. Every West German knew about that, and about the Berlin Airlift: these became locations of national memory from which West Germany triangulated its sense of self.

There were some Germans for whom this was too much. Anti-Americanism was ingrained among West Germany's hard left, the early Green Party and the tiny hard right. But even Germans who were suspicious of America had no fear of tying themselves closer to Europe. On the contrary, that was exactly what they wanted. The standard explanation of this is guilt. West Germans, in this argument, felt so remorseful about the horrors of the Second World War that they wanted to make amends. This idea fitted with others' belief that Germany did indeed have much to feel guilty about.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 06:16:42 PM EST
Entertaining but no. Just no.

I mean, my first reaction is to go through it with scissors and point out all the stuff he leaves ut that would complicate the picture, but it doesn't really matter. The Junker's manorialism was destroyed by the Soviets in 1945 and besides West Germany dominates the new Germany politicly and economically.

And his political and economical analysis of the re-unification with West paying for it all misses the Western economic elites taking over the ownership in the East and the East role in keeping the value of the currency down. And so on.

There is probably East-West splits in Germany today, but it is more reasonable to look at re-unification than an economic system that was abolished eighty years ago.

by fjallstrom on Thu Sep 21st, 2017 at 03:51:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
if western Europe wants Germany to keep singing "Ode to Joy"

If Western Europe really wanted that, they would have come up with some words to their anthem....

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Sep 21st, 2017 at 04:30:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
West Germany was anything but an artificial construct. It was the historical Germany, being almost geographically identical to what was, for almost 1,200 years, the only Germany. Julius Caesar named the land ...

wow. What a ludicrous premise. So yeah. no, just no in the first instance.

This essay is a wonderful example of "casual" bigotry. Thanks, Helen. File in "Romanticism" / Contemporary Polemic / AfD Sympathizer / Failed States.

  1. Answer: Comparison of political (ethnic) divisions in the other 26, especially the united kingdoms' and Catalunya at the moment, demonstrate why it is always a mistake to isolate current events from their historical, contemporaneous contexts. Indeed, but for Roman empire and the Napoleanic dynasty --not US magisterial authority after VJ Day-- neither "nationalism" across europe nor EU federalism would be of much concern to the author today. He'd be a back-stabbing courtier.

  2. "Politics are local." And local politics invariable concern distribution of tax receipts among citizens. Adenauer and Kennedy understood that identity, as was convenient for them, as anethema [!] to the demos during Reconstruction.

  3. Germans are heavily taxed. And Brits are about to be retroactively taxed heavily, too, for the same purpose --mediating political malfeasance including cost of re-unification. #2019Charge, #NoRetroTax and tax avoidance

With Donald Trump's wavering on Nato and his noisy anti-German protectionism, along with Brexit, the West may no longer seem vital to Germany's future.

Hawes is barking up the wrong tree.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Sep 21st, 2017 at 07:27:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The rise of the new German right 16 Sep 2017 podcast

AfD "leader" credits US tea party for her party's founding in 2013.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Sep 22nd, 2017 at 05:33:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian - David Shariatmadari - There's no crisis of free speech. Milo's campus crusade is rank hypocrisy

If you're curious as to what a basket of deplorables looks like in real life, perhaps you should head over to Berkeley next week, where Steve Bannon, Milo Yiannopoulos, Ann Coulter and friends will gather for a "festival of free expression" at the University of California campus. Maybe they'll oblige by arriving in a hot air balloon, to render the metaphor entirely literal.

The fact is, they may not arrive at all: Yiannopoulos, who is helping stage the series of events, has made a point of selecting "everyone who has been prevented from speaking at Berkeley in the last 12 months". But "prevented" should be taken with a pinch of salt. Anti-immigrant firebrand Coulter, for example, decided of her own accord to cancel an appearance in April after the authorities allocated her a time slot designed to minimise the likelihood of a disturbance. "It's a sad day for free speech," she lamented, apparently without irony. This time around, the university administration has complained that deadlines for booking venues have been missed and fees remain unpaid. Yiannopoulos calls it a "coordinated bureaucratic mission to silence conservative voices". Is it possible that the organisers would like nothing more than for Berkeley to insist on reasonable measures to ensure order, before flouncing off and crying censorship? Surely not.
[....]
As far as I can see, the direction of travel is not towards a greater number of limits on behaviour, but simply to different ones. And, though there is certainly much to argue about in the detail, these limits seem in general to be more enlightened - less about controlling people, and more about protecting them - than those of the past. The reactionary right paints this shift as a kind of tyranny: the policing of thought, an attempt to curtail hitherto unfettered freedom. But they would do, wouldn't they, because it is their moral code that is gradually being dismantled.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Sep 20th, 2017 at 07:02:28 PM EST
VOA/NPR noted in passing that Madame May floated 24B (USD, EUR, BPB? not sure) ransom figure.

Italians approve of May's speech venue, but not content

The fourth round of Brexit negotiations has been postponed until next week. Officially this was by common accord; but actually, on British demand without much explanation. [...]Only one out of many Italian TV programmes - RaiNews21 - broadcast May's speech, without the Q&A, and with a close-up on May with a backdrop reading "Shared History Shared Challenges Shared Future".


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Fri Sep 22nd, 2017 at 09:21:33 PM EST
Seems as tho the initial good impressions of the speech are been downgraded as people read more into it.

Peter North Political Blog - Mrs May's Florence ambush; setting the stage for a walk-out.

I think Mrs May's speech in Florence yesterday was a turning point. Though it was short on detail, it was heavy on soothing rhetoric. This is not out of the ordinary, but the fact it was billed as a game changer and given in Florence (to much fanfare) tells us this is all part of a propaganda stunt aimed at a domestic audience.

Though the speech has been universally panned on Twitter, it should not be forgotten that Twitter is largely a bubble where hacks interact with each other to the exclusion of all else. The layman and the party faithful, however, will see it only at face value - an ambitious and reasonable offer to the EU. In politics you only need fool some of the people some of the time.

The speech, though, is an ambush.....



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Sep 23rd, 2017 at 06:04:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yeah, I read a more sardonic review this morning. May's breakup speech made Brexit sound magical ... if you're drinking Bacardi .

Media's producers seem to be running out of fresh material and new faces. They may have even squandered all of the "fake" drama. Such are the programming limitations of the broadcast news industry.

On the bright side, this phase of the "cycle" may provide optimal conditions for the Tories to concentrate on  terms of settlement before them. Just one "unexpected" announcement of specific agreement could revive the show for another six months.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Sep 23rd, 2017 at 07:00:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Britain's contributions for two years would be at least 20 billion euros (£18 billion, $24 billion) -- although this falls well below European estimates of Britain's total Brexit bill.

"As the GBP Slides" w/o 18 Sep 2017

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Sep 23rd, 2017 at 08:50:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Party   ARD    ZDF    
CDU     32.5%  33.5%
SPD     20%    21%
AfD     13.5%  13%
FDP     10.5%  10%
Linke   9%     9%
Green   9.5%   9%

So congratulations, AfD is the strongest opposition party. Oh wait, the SPD is still there: they have immediately decided not to join another government. So it looks like Jamaica (CDU/FDP/Green). Weird times and the republic of Germany as we know it is over.

Schengen is toast!

by epochepoque on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 04:23:39 PM EST
CDU -8.8
SPD -5.5
Linke +0.3
Green +1
AfD   +8.7
FDP   +5.7

Losses of the CDU correspond to the gains of the AfD. Greens hold it (surprisingly).

Schengen is toast!

by epochepoque on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 04:27:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
SPD going the way of all European social democrats (PASOK, PS, ...): down. Worst result since the founding of the republic. Merkel remarkbly misses her potential (seen at up to 40%).

Narrative point: SPD should have excluded another grand coalition -> a real alternative to Merkel -> more votes.

Schengen is toast!

by epochepoque on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 04:38:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It appears to me that Get-Out-the-Vote campaign Kleiner Fünf is not performing as intended.
Fearing the AfD, young German activists try to mobilize voters


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 04:48:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The campaign was always destined to fail. That the cast of Fack ju göhte is involved is just ironic in the culture wars setting.

Schengen is toast!
by epochepoque on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 04:55:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
AfD second strongest party in the East. They have superseded the Linke as the leading protest party. The  Linke being part of state governments is seen as part of the establishment.

Schengen is toast!
by epochepoque on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 04:53:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The SPD, having hit rock bottom, having been crushed by the CDU in successive grand coalitions, having been sucked dry, has at least one small satisfaction: they can now show the middle finger to the CDU, refuse another grand coalition and 'sentence' them to Jamaica.

It's not just a three-party coalition but actually four: CDU/CSU/FDP/Greens. First, they need to get buy-in from the CSU who suffered a ten points loss in Bavaria and have to fight a state election next year. The analysis by CSU chief Seehofer is unequivocal: they left a hole open in the "right flank" and need to close it. That of course will clash with the more lefty Greens. Mix into that the FDP who stylize themselves as fresh and don't want to be sucked dry again either (bad memories from 2009-2013) and would like to play opposition. This constellation will put the government on the hot seat. With no clear successor visible for Merkel in the CDU, I can see a rather ugly end for her chancelorship.

In the TV shows you could almost see the CDU and FDP personnel begging the SPD guys to think about continuing the government. But nope. Things are very bad but this is a very satisfying FU.

Schengen is toast!

by epochepoque on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 08:26:50 PM EST
Do you imagine Linder bargaining for a cabinet appointment? I don't have any opinion about the strength of his constituency. I've read he's the figurehead, and there's no federal-level experience in the party.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sun Sep 24th, 2017 at 10:46:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
City of Darkness: The most densely populated place on earth is now abandoned - Abandoned Spaces
There is no better way to describe the atmosphere of the Kowloon Walled City than with the words of Leung Ping-kwan, a well-known Hong Kong poet, novelist, essayist, scholar, important cultural figure of the city, and recipient of the Hong Kong Medal of Honor. In his book City of Darkness, he wrote the following: "Here, prostitutes installed themselves on one side of the street while a priest preached and handed out powdered milk to the poor on the other; social workers gave guidance while drug addicts squatted under the stairs getting high; what were children's games centers by day became strip-show venues by night. It was a very complex place, difficult to generalize about, a place that seemed frightening but where most people continued to lead normal lives. A place just like the rest of Hong Kong." Leung Ping-kwan - City of Darkness, p. 120
by fjallstrom on Mon Sep 25th, 2017 at 02:36:11 PM EST
I've never been to Hong Kong. I have been to Shanghai, but not long enough (at least one month) to get much farther on foot than Old City recommended restaurants. At that time, planners were still working out how to promote colonial charms of the neighborhood. But if I had, I suppose I would have wandered into a "quarter" that looked a lot more like Kowloon -- The ruins of a slum within an "enclave."

Kowloon photos immediately reminded me of locations in the film Push. Yes, and there it is.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Mon Sep 25th, 2017 at 07:59:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]


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