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LQD: "I don't know how to be human any more."

by ARGeezer Thu Sep 7th, 2017 at 05:19:10 PM EST

Tropical Depressions  Sam Kriss, Ellie Mae O'Hagan  The Baffler

On a wretched December afternoon in 2015, as raindrops pattered a planetary threnody on grayed-out streets, five thousand activists gathered around Paris's Arc de Triomphe, hoping to force world leaders to do something, anything, that would save the future. Ellie was there. But what she remembers most from that afternoon during the UN's Climate Change Conference wasn't what happened in the open, in front of cameras and under the sky. As they took the Metro together, activists commiserated, briefly, before the moment of struggle and the need to be brave, over just how hopeless it could sometimes feel. People talked about bafflement, rage, despair; the sense of having discovered a huge government conspiracy to wipe out the human race--but one that everybody knows about and nobody seems willing to stop.

Twenty meters beneath the Paris streets, the Metro became a cocoon, tight and terrified, in which a brief moment of honest release was possible. Eventually someone expressed the psychic toll in words that have stuck with Ellie since. It was a chance remark: "I don't know how to be human any more."


Climate change means, quite plausibly, the end of everything we now understand to constitute our humanity. If action isn't taken soon, the Amazon rainforest will eventually burn down, the seas will fester into sludge that submerges the world's great cities, the Antarctic Ice Sheet will fragment and wash away, acres of abundant green land will be taken over by arid desert. A 4-degree Celsius rise in global temperatures would, within a century, produce a world as different from the one we have now as ours is from that of the Ice Age. And any humans who survive this human-made chaos would be as remote from our current consciousness as we are from that of the first shamanists ten thousand years ago, who themselves survived on the edges of a remote and cold planet. Something about the magnitude of all this is shattering: most people try not to think about it too much because it's unthinkable, in the same way that death is always unthinkable for the living. For the people who have to think about it--climate scientists, activists, and advocates--that looming catastrophe evokes a similar horror: the potential extinction of humanity in the future puts humanity into question now.

Putting humanity into question is a good and necessary  thing at this juncture. It is already very late to do so. Our horizons of concern are too limited by our own expected lifetimes. That could be our ultimate collective act of hubris.

Display:
I think it is highly unlikely homo sap. sap. will go extinct.  Semi-intelligent forward vision bipedal omnivorous pack hunters are too biologically successful (and vicious)for this ecological choke point to whip us out.  I do think by 2100 the human population will be below 1 billion and possibly below 500 million.    

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Thu Sep 7th, 2017 at 07:06:09 PM EST
I agree, but the danger is not extinction but the loss of the ecosystem in which we evolved, the loss of 90%   population in a highly traumatic fashion along with what that will do to human society and the loss of so much of the beauty of the present system. There will be opportunities as well, but I fear what we could make of them - given how poorly we have dealt with the present situation.  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Sep 7th, 2017 at 10:02:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Georgia Guidestones --- From Wikipedia ...

1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
  1. Guide reproduction wisely -- improving fitness and diversity.
  2. Unite humanity with a living new language.
  3. Rule passion -- faith -- tradition -- and all things with tempered reason.
  4. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
  5. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
  6. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
  7. Balance personal rights with social duties.
  8. Prize truth -- beauty -- love -- seeking harmony with the infinite.
  9. Be not a cancer on the earth -- Leave room for nature -- Leave room for nature.

by das monde on Fri Sep 8th, 2017 at 12:49:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If you were to consider Gaia as a living, even reasoning, entity devoted to our maturation as a species, whose language to us wilfully deaf humans was weather and its aggregate, climate, what would she do?
Punishing weather in the past seemed oddly to devastate countries such as Bangla Desh, Mauritius and Haiti, even Syria, countries whose eco footprint was relatively tiny compared to America and Europe.
It's as if Gaia wanted us to change our ways because of compassion for the weak and vulnerable, and there wasn't enough.
So now it seems like the opposite method of awakening awareness may be being used.
Go hit where the root cause is strongest.
Houston is one of the richest cities in the world, Florida one of the wealthiest states.
These are the people who were most blissfully removed from the worst of climate chaos.
(Next stop Washington?)
Two effects already noted: 1, Trump and Pelosi agree on delaying debt ceiling talks, 2, these wealthy states whose governors sneered at government and welfare for the needy are now humbly begging for state aid, blowing a mile-wide hole in the traditional 'small government, low taxes' philosophy.
Not the first time, I know, but it rams the point home again harder that 'no man is an island'.
(And that most Republicans are forked-tongued, selfish, hypocritical fools, incidentally).
   

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Fri Sep 8th, 2017 at 01:53:40 AM EST
Nah, it's just random chance: North America is a pretty shitty environment for humans at the best of times, most of it is uninhabitable for large populations without a fairly high tech level.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Sep 8th, 2017 at 10:26:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the opposite has been the problem - such a richness of resources that their exploitation to depletion wasn't deemed to be a problem. So much space that people could imagine themselves as self-sufficient without recourse to "society" or all those communistic urban planning constraints.  

Libertarianism as a philosophy couldn't prosper in a very poor society where everyone is dependent on everyone else for survival. Material success allowed people to imagine themselves as gods over all they could purvey - or purchase.

Paradoxically, for such a supposedly religious society, it is one of the most materialistic on earth, and the most destructive... Poor planning, the lack of a concept of the common good, the supremacy of short term material self interest have all led to this. Climate change is merely an amplifier.

Index of Frank's Diaries

by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Fri Sep 8th, 2017 at 04:55:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hence the old snark that there are no poor people in the US, just temporarily embarrassed millionaires.
by rifek on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 01:20:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My favorite line in Snowpiercer occurs during the trial of MASON: "It's not me! It's not me!" because what follows as a reprieve leads to her destruction anyhow.

Conversely The Happening, wherein GAIA burps, "humanity" politely pauses, dialogue appears unnecessary.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 03:50:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've read this essay several times, searching for signs that the authors are aware its escatological composition annihilates any prescriptive message they may intend by invoking Solomon, Kristeva, Freud, and Marx?, but not, say, Fanon or Lao Tzu which is intriguing to me, because this type of omission ("argument from silence": Bernal) speaks clinical volumes  instead of the authors' preoccupation with "alienation" and "learning". It's not extinction of "humanity."

It is Lifeboat Britain

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Fri Sep 8th, 2017 at 05:43:03 PM EST
The eschatological implications are conditional. Things will get worse before they can get better, for sure. That is already baked into the cake. But dire outcomes CAN be averted with a much larger response than we are currently organizing. We have to look objectively at what is needed and then what is required to accomplish that. Instead we are focusing on what we can sell to a population systematically misled by those whose short term profits might be negatively impacted. It is possible to avert the worst of what can be coming, but it is not likely that we will be able to do so.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 03:25:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
is a genre of religious literature peculiar to jewish tradition in prophecy. It is not predictive speech. To presume that a prophet's testament (these two authors', for example) is "conditional" is to gainsay the definitive judgment of god regarding the condition (fealty to god) of the people. (Christine Hayes' treatment of the political function of prophets is instructive in this case.)

Psycho-analytic criticism is a genre of literature discredited by scientists who prefer to interpret chemical reactivity as expressing particular autonomic dysfunctions. Certain inferences are then extrapolated to "humanity", as is the custom of many a totalizing regime.

The authors pass over deconstruction methods in the DIY tool kit.

The judgment of their scientific informant, Australian marine biologist Jon Brodie, is "we've failed" to remedy or even prepare for climate change. But "Would I want to live like someone in Papua New Guinea to avoid climate change?" Brodie wonders. "Probably not."

Accordingly, the authors retreat from the brooding "we" to a peculiar image repertoire symbolizing anxiety or trauma --the causes being manifold and irreversible-- which the neurotic alone cannot repair.

In January of this year, a young Gambian man drowned in Venice's Grand Canal, while tourists in their gondolas laughed and filmed him on their phones. This was inhuman, and it suggests that the most immediate collapse of humanity might come from those places that will feel the physical brunt of climate change least directly. In the UK, which is more likely than most countries to escape desertification and mass famine, official and unofficial plans for the future are informed by the idea of a "Lifeboat Britain."

The author's conclusion attempts to reinforce the subliminal message, I need help.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 01:52:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
eschatology and milleniarism is a genre of religious literature peculiar to jewish tradition in prophecy.

The Millerites in 17th Century England and the subsequent repetition of the phenomenon would indicate otherwise, but you may be right regarding only religious literature, depending on what is considered 'literature'. I expect that most if not all of these groups used the written word to spread the word of the world's end. Today it is words and speech, much of it on the internet.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 02:36:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Millerites

literature

I already linked rationalwiki eschatology, of which millenialism, subsection secular iterations.

Chistine Hayes
here, in particular lectures 15 - 19.

She and Dale Martin are quite the pairing for those who'd rather not get into the weeds of ecumenical "faith" or prefer to climb out of them.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 03:12:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You said: "eschatology and milleniarism
is a genre of religious literature peculiar to jewish tradition in prophecy." I respinded that it is not at all peculiar to the jewish tradition as it has spread to Christianity. I could also have noted the Mayan concept of the Katun, much of which was made leading up to 2012, even if tey used a different number system As you could have said Judeo-Christain Tradition I took it that you did mean 'peculiar to the Jewish tradition.

Now that I think of it, Norse mythology and the 'Twilight of the Gods' Is a similar eschatology, perhaps again not millenerian. According to The Viking Answer Lady Norse speakers did use a base 10 counting system.
http://vikinganswerlady.com/numeric-reckoning.shtml

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 09:29:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Explain to me what distinction the term "Judeo-Christian tradition" obtains apart from "jewish tradition in prophecy" narrated in the OT and NT.

Besides calling out the psychiatrists to which the authors refer, I took on the subject to assign that prophetic role to the authors in this eschatological, calamitous, era which they identify with climate change and inhumanity, degradation, incontinence, alienation, &tc. Were you able to listen to the Hayes and Martin lectures (You may find transcript @ Yale; some do along with syllabus), you would apprehend the relevance of that function in that tradition is not predictive power.

What happened to prophet Isiah, prophet Jesus, prophet Luther (HAPPY BIRTHDAY!), prophet Miller? Nevermind.

Consider the relevance of pagan or gentile prophetic traditions to the authors' despair amid "human futilitarianism".

I visited VikingLady years ago, looked around, and haven't been back. It was difficult to avoid as there are few more authoritative references on "humanity" (and wiccan ritual and recipes) beside Smedley Butler and Robert Altmeyer.  

And The Bible.

Little Known Fact: an UID, also a film buff, responded to a comment I posted about The 13th Warrior --much in the way I recommended Last Kingdom to you. You know that story: Muslim ambassador meets crude Vikings in thrall of superstition, dispels mystery. walp, VikingLady keeps an excerpt of ibn whathefu's memoir. That encounter with Rus was reported to be the literary basis of the film plot. Of course, I went in search of the translator and complete text, because that's what I do.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 at 01:31:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I very much enjoyed The 13th Warrior. It fit well what I understood about both the Viking world and Dar al Islam.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 11th, 2017 at 02:03:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by chance another secondary source
< wipes tears >
Alfred of Wessex (Las Kingdom makes a cameo appearance

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sat Sep 16th, 2017 at 07:16:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
From runestones it's pretty clear that the Vikings used a predominantly ten-based system, but without symbols for numbers other than abbreviations. So I think the Viking lady is right on that one.

Not using symbols for numbers, I don't think there was millennialism as such as in the magic of big, round numbers. Or at least I haven't heard of it.

The Twilight of the Gods on Norse mythology is interesting because it becomes less clear the more one studies it. Has it happened? Is it going to happen? An interpretation I have come across is that what we see is a mix of a cyclic myth with death and re-birth of the world colored by the three year winter 536-539 AD as Fimbulwinter and interpreted through and adopted to a Christian world by Snorre. That could explain the variations and unclear time frame.

by fjallstrom on Mon Sep 11th, 2017 at 03:15:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Am I to understand, Millerite eschatology and religious dogma does not rely on bible literature?

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sat Sep 9th, 2017 at 03:20:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Certainly not. I was responding to your 'peculiar' qualifier and have so noted above.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 11th, 2017 at 02:10:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Jewish eschatology may have been born of a Babylonian environmental overshot, or several ancient overshots in the "fertile crescent". And yeah, Babylonian liberals with middle class humanitarian sensibilities were sitting ducks of that "apocalyptic" selection event:

The world's Holy Books - the Old and New Testaments, the Ko­ran, religious literature from the Middle Ages to this day - echo this voice of rebellion, combining contempt for the corrupt urban life, sus­picion of the merchant, and often, intense misogyny.
by das monde on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 at 04:13:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is motif that Bernal investigates in the three volumes of Black Athena. The first volume cause the most status quo ruckus, because Bernal tackles systematic "afro-asiatic" censorship. His project, first published 1987 by Rutgers, encouraged a vanguard of "multicultural" scholars like Hayes and Martin (above) or Graeber, who attained notoriety when he was dismissed from Yale for "wandering off the reservation".

Vagaries of Fashion: Abrahamic Faiths and Law

Bernal laid out as never before the historicizing, totalizing authority of european scholarship --especially among "classicists" who rejected "Ancient Model" historiography in order to define "Aryan" models of world history, humanity, civilization, and valid scientific, or empirical, "positivism" serving concomitant polemic serving divine and darwinian hierarchy of "races". Bernal does this by cross-examining three centuries of canonical literature and tuition sponsored by "gatekeepers" anchored to "Greek civilization". The other two volumes employ historical linguistic technique to translate archaeological materials and critique ethnographic syllabaries, cognates, and 'industry' persisting to this day. Now, note: Bernal's investigation does not reject out of hand all prior art. That's not his purpose; It is to restore "multicultural" material and authority to the body of knowledge of "humanity" which should be available to students.

Panic
The authors of this curiously titled essay "Tropical Depression" posit the ethical crisis, Who is disturbed by all manner of crises which "climate change" represents?
That depends, I suppose, on who has the time to investigate the "special case" --the parable-- of Pateh Sabally

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 at 01:44:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Arthur Wyns is a tropical biologist passionate about biodiversity and climate change action." This may explain in part his motive to promote Climate-KIC.

One group will be traveling from the fruit-orchards in Bologna, Italy, to a business innovation hub in Munich, Germany, and finally to Helsinki, Finland, where they will pitch the project they have developed during the course of their journey to a jury of entrepreneurs and businessmen.

The six other groups that are being guided through Europe undergo a similar process, travelling from city to city and cultivating an out-of-the-box idea into a concrete business-plan.

where cultivating tropical biodiversity has been quite successful.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Sep 14th, 2017 at 04:15:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Accordingly, the authors retreat from the brooding "we" to a peculiar image repertoire symbolizing anxiety or trauma --the causes being manifold and irreversible-- which the neurotic alone cannot repair."

I categorically reject this response and embrace optimism as a choice. I belived the current climate challenge can be substantially met, even as I acknowledge the improbability of so doing. I cannot and will not reject my own mortality, the mortality of the civilization into which I was born or the possibility of the extinction of the human species. I have long maintained that one cannot live life while denying death and extending that position to include the death of my culture and species seems natural and logical to me.

The psychoanalyst turned historian Ele Sagan in 'The Honey and the Hemlock - Democracy and Paranoia in Ancient Greece and Modern America' notes that the real miracle is that, given the many psychological debilities of human beings, we have managed to survive this long in societies this complex. If we cannot save ourselves when it is quite possible to do so we do not deserve to survive - IMO.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 11th, 2017 at 02:32:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If we have a chance to survive, and we try it, we might survive.

If we have a chance to survive, and we don't try it, we won't survive. Or at least it's likely to depress the chance.

Embracing optimism, it's the logical choice.

by fjallstrom on Mon Sep 11th, 2017 at 03:42:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Accordingly, the authors retreat from the brooding "we" to a peculiar image repertoire symbolizing anxiety or trauma --the causes being manifold and irreversible-- which the neurotic alone cannot repair."

I categorically reject this response and embrace optimism as a choice. I belived the current climate challenge can be substantially met, even as I acknowledge the improbability of so doing. I cannot and will not reject my own mortality, the mortality of the civilization into which I was born or the possibility of the extinction of the human species. I have long maintained that one cannot live life while denying death and extending that position to include the death of my culture and species seems natural and logical to me.

The psychoanalyst turned historian Ele Sagan in 'The Honey and the Hemlock - Democracy and Paranoia in Ancient Greece and Modern America' notes that the real miracle is that, given the many psychological debilities of human beings, we have managed to survive this long in societies this complex. If we cannot save ourselves when it is quite possible to do so we do not deserve to survive - IMO.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 11th, 2017 at 02:34:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No Gas in Florida: Give Truth a Chance
...One of the first things that struck me about Cuba was that they take seriously the task Davis dismisses: how to know what it means to be human. When I mentioned this in academic presentations, I got jeered. In retrospect, I don't think I was understood. How could I be? ...


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Thu Sep 14th, 2017 at 12:39:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is an excellent article with which I almost entirely agree. And I fully agree with what I read of Wade Davis' views on 'being human'.

What sprang immediately to my mind upon reading this article in the context of our ongoing conversation was Ernst Becker's The Denial of Death. (Full length PDF) Following is an excerpt from the foreword by Sam Keen:

In the years since his death, Becker has been widely recognized as one of the great spiritual cartographers of our age and a wise physician of the soul. Gradually, reluctantly, we are beginning to acknowledge that the bitter medicine he prescribes -- contemplation of the horror of our inevitable death -- is, paradoxically, the tincture that adds sweetness to mortality.

Becker's philosophy as it emerges in Denial of Death and Escape from Evil is a braid woven from four strands.

The first strand. The world is terrifying. To say the least, Becker's account of nature has little in common with Walt Disney. Mother Nature is a brutal bitch, red in tooth and claw, who destroys what she creates. We live, he says, in a creation in which the routine activity for organisms is "tearing others apart with teeth of all types -- biting, grinding flesh, plant stalks, bones between molars, pushing the pulp greedily down the gullet with delight, incorporating its essence into one's own organization, and then excreting with foul stench and gasses the residue."

The second strand. The basic motivation for human behavior is our biological need to control our basic anxiety, to deny the terror of death. Human beings are naturally anxious because we are ultimately helpless and abandoned in a world where we are fated to die. "This is the terror: to have emerged from nothing, to have a name, consciousness of self, deep inner feelings, an excruciating inner yearning for life and self-expression -- and with all this yet to die."

Elizabeth Kubler-Ross and Ernest Becker were strange allies in fomenting the cultural revolution that brought death and dying out of the closet. At the same  time that Kubler-Ross gave us permission to practice the art of dying gracefully, Becker taught us that awe, fear, and ontological anxiety were natural accompaniments to our contemplation of the fact of death.

The third strand. Since the terror of death is so overwhelming we conspire to keep it unconscious. "The vital lie of character" is the first line of defense that protects us from the painful awareness of our helplessness. Every child borrows power from adults and creates a personality by introjecting the qualities of the godlike being. If I am like my all-powerful father I will not die. So long as we stay obediently within the defense mechanisms of our personality, what Wilhelm  Reich called "character armor" we feel safe and are able to pretend that the world is manageable. But the price we pay is high. We repress our bodies to purchase a soul that time cannot destroy; we sacrifice pleasure to buy immortality; we encapsulate ourselves to avoid death. And life escapes us while we huddle within the
defended fortress of character.

Society provides the second line of defense against our natural impotence by creating a hero system that allows us to believe that we transcend death by participating in something of lasting worth. We achieve ersatz immortality by sacrificing ourselves to conquer an empire, to build a temple, to write a book, to establish a family, to accumulate a fortune, to further progress and prosperity, to create an information-society and global free market. Since the main task of human life is to become heroic and transcend death, every culture must provide its members with an intricate symbolic system that is covertly religious. This means that ideological conflicts between cultures are essentially battles between immortality projects, holy wars.

One of Becker's lasting contributions to social psychology has been to help us understand that corporations and nations may be driven by unconscious motives that have little to do with their stated goals. Making a killing in business or on the battlefield frequently has less to do with economic need or political reality than with the need for assuring ourselves that we have achieved something of lasting worth.


Forty years on I might now have to re-read and finish that book.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Sep 14th, 2017 at 02:30:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That may be a constructive activity, if your goal is understanding why you stopped reading it.

I've been rereading books in my stacks for decades. One's perspective or attitude toward the world, "the context," changes -- in my case anyway.

Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.

by Cat on Thu Sep 14th, 2017 at 04:07:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Same here. I got far enough into it to validate beliefs I had independently formed, but I had only limited time for such reading in those days, with work, family, etc.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Sep 14th, 2017 at 04:17:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tampa Bay's coming storm - Washington Post - July 28, 2017
The area is due for a major hurricane, and it is not prepared. If a big one scores a direct hit, the damage would likely surpass Katrina.

TAMPA BAY, Fla. -- Mark Luther's dream home has a window that looks out to a world of water. ...

"Why stay?" asked Luther, an oceanographer who knows perfectly well a hurricane could one day shove 15 feet of water into his living room. "It's just so nice."...

Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn's warning was even starker. Standing outside City Hall last year, he described what would happen if a hurricane as small as a category 3 with 110 mph to 130 mph winds hit downtown. "Where you're standing now would be 15 feet under water," he said. ...

The last direct hit from a category 3 in 1921 left the area in ruins, but few people lived there then. A single death was recorded. ...

On the edge of Tampa Bay, where the danger from a colossal storm is worse, homes in Venetian Isles and flood-prone Shore Acres are still being snatched up. "I can't believe what houses here are selling for," she said.



Schengen is toast!
by epochepoque on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 at 02:50:21 PM EST

The Dutch Have Solutions to Rising Seas. The World Is Watching.


Diversity is the key to economic and political evolution.
by Cat on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 at 04:14:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Learning How to Die in the Anthropocene - Roy Scranton - NyTimes
the biggest problems the Anthropocene poses are precisely those that have always been at the root of humanistic and philosophical questioning: "What does it mean to be human?" and "What does it mean to live?" In the epoch of the Anthropocene, the question of individual mortality -- "What does my life mean in the face of death?" -- is universalized and framed in scales that boggle the imagination. What does human existence mean against 100,000 years of climate change? What does one life mean in the face of species death or the collapse of global civilization? How do we make meaningful choices in the shadow of our inevitable end? ...

"Meditation on inevitable death should be performed daily." Instead of fearing my end, I owned it....

The biggest problem we face is a philosophical one: understanding that this civilization is already dead. The sooner we confront this problem, and the sooner we realize there's nothing we can do to save ourselves, the sooner we can get down to the hard work of adapting, with mortal humility, to our new reality. ...

We can continue acting as if tomorrow will be just like yesterday, growing less and less prepared for each new disaster as it comes, and more and more desperately invested in a life we can't sustain. Or we can learn to see each day as the death of what came before, freeing ourselves to deal with whatever problems the present offers without attachment or fear. If we want to learn to live in the Anthropocene, we must first learn how to die.



Schengen is toast!
by epochepoque on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 at 02:55:50 PM EST
Sobering synopsis.
It really is coming down to what it was always all about: dying with dignity.
Thanks for this epoquepoque.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Sep 10th, 2017 at 07:49:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Quite apropos.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Sep 11th, 2017 at 02:40:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]


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