Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
I was talking more along the lines of the WWII generation.  Obviously the lessons don't hold up well these days (nor in Reagan's days).  The dramatic differences between the post-war activities in Europe, after WWI and after WWII, were what I was getting at.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Nov 11th, 2005 at 10:42:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Certainly, the reparation written into the treaty of Versailles were a recipe for Economic disaster. The winners must have thought that sucking the economic lifeblood out of Germany would keep its military might down in the long run. How little imagination they had! They didn't realize that they were leaving Germany no option but to become a war economy. Hitler did preside over a miraculous economic recovery fuelled by militarization.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 11th, 2005 at 10:46:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's something economists don't like to discuss, but Hitler was actually the first leader of a major world power to put Keynesian economics into action, successfully.

Versailles was, without question, disastrous.  All parties failed.  Wilson was too obsessed with the League of Nations.  He was also not capable of competing, intellectually, with the European leaders.  It's a problem American politicians, with the possible exception of Clinton, seem to always have.  Lloyd George played two roles:  (1) of the man who didn't care, and (2) the politician, pandering to the public.

Full disclosure:  I'm not a big fan of Wilson, especially not as a person.  He was a racist pig and, even before the stroke, not at all bright, especially for someone from Princeton.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Nov 11th, 2005 at 10:53:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's something economists don't like to discuss, but Hitler was actually the first leader of a major world power to put Keynesian economics into action, successfully.
There are too many things that economists don't like to discuss. In this case, it is politically inconvenient to discuss it, but political inconvenience should not be a factor in scientific discussions.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 11th, 2005 at 11:39:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Couldn't agree more.  Just ask Joan Robinson, who, some would say, was denied the Nobel Prize because she "sympathized" with some principles of Marxian thought.  Nevermind that she was an important economist.  There are more than a few members of the Thought Police of the Right in the field, just as there are from the Left in sociology.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Nov 11th, 2005 at 01:28:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series