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Actually, Migeru was right -- there were some school districts that were saying if you didn't medicate your kid on their advice, they could kick the kid out.  I don't know all the ins and outs of the legislation or how widespread it was, but some states and, finally, the federal government passed bills disallowing schools to do this.  

This has largely been talked about in right-wing circles since, y'know, education is a "librul" thing.  This is exactly the sort of issue that the Republicans grab on to and use to great effect in demonizing the left on a local level, even though the school boards are packed with right-wing fanatics and they operate like small dictatorships.  It would probably be a good move for us to get on top of stuff like this.

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 05:51:37 PM EST
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Thanks, Izzy, I couldn't locate my original (online) source and I began to think I was having a tinfoil moment.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 06:00:34 PM EST
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I know -- it all sounds so preposterous you start to think "could that possibly be?"

I had one of those moments the first time I was telling someone that Angelina Jolie was a UN Goodwill Ambassador -- I stopped myself and went to check.

Maybe we can eventually make language a complete impediment to understanding. -Hobbes

by Izzy (izzy at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 26th, 2006 at 06:04:39 PM EST
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I think this likely varies from state to state, and country to country, but in California a person can even refuse medication who is in a hospital on a 5150 hold (non-voluntarily because they aren't safe in public), so unless a doctor goes to a judge and can prove that there is a real need for someone being forced to take medications (again, their own safety), and then the judge can give a waiver, that must be periodically re-visited (I'm foggy now...every 14 days?). It is about protecting the patient's rights.  I'm curious though, if this exists in other countries...hadn't ever thought of that. What are people's rights in this regard, under EU and international laws, I wonder...

"Once in awhile we get shown the light, in the strangest of places, if we look at it right" - Hunter/Garcia
by whataboutbob on Fri Jan 27th, 2006 at 04:28:31 AM EST
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