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if the experience of living downwind of a volcano is anything to go by, this is a terrible idea.

huge, by nature clumsy, techno-fixes should be left to sci-fi, imo.

kudos to nanne and gaianne for their pointing to the real issue: scaling back demand, thoroughly and fast.

this is a political problem, and when enough people are discomfited, bottom-up pressure from the public can change the future.

i fear waiting that long though, and am hoping against hope for an awakening of common sense and humility.

humility enters because i am so fed up with the sense of entitlement we in europe and america have to our 'lifestyles', which should be called 'deathstyles'.

we assume it's ok that 4/5ths of the world will never have a hundredth of the frivolous luxury we take for granted, and debate from that premise.

this is not to preach from some moral high horse, rather a cool(ish!)appraisal of the relative alienation our lifestyle comes packaged with.

solar panels, wifi and laptops are potentially brilliant global consolidators, and i wish for their spread, to foster connectivity (and collectivity).

i honour all the brilliance our cultures continue to offer the world, but  hopefully we can rein in our superiority complex, and especially act more respectfully to our neighbours.

for example the way putin's been treated by europe lately really makes us look callow and clueless.

sometimes i think the fact that america is so much worse at diplomacy lately. is letting europe seem genteely restrained in comparison.

we should not be excusing our own behaviour with this kind of relativism.

indeed we cannot afford to, and should realise that pronto.

out of the ashes of many failed empires, here in europe we are cobbling something special in world history together.

by reaching out the hand of friendship to poorer countries, we are building concordance, and investing in future conditions for lasting peace.

without getting too specific about ideology or the lack of it, there is a euro-model emerging, one that we could perhaps bless, but ONLY if we radically change our relationship with energy use.

art, culture, education, social frameworks are all to be proud of, but unless we leave the earth in a much more livable condition, they are all moot.

european women are reproducing 1.5 children, to 'break even', they need to produce 2.1, or there will be no support for the old folks.

italy's offering a one-off payment of €2,000 to have a child.

we are told it's good when affluent societies reduce their birth rate.

considering what it takes to raise a child, this is not even symbolic, unless of how little faith governments have in the worth of their future citizens.

perhaps if cities weren't so toxic, and the rural areas underserved, mothers would want to have more children.

perhaps if families were not being financially bled by the month to pay increasing utilities, they could afford to salt a little more away for their kids' future educations.

if there is another revolution, it won't be with guns.

it will be the streets and piazzas clogged with furious citizens waving sheaves of bills they can't pay!

bills asking for money that will be siphoned off to other countries to pollute more with.

and so it goes

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Oct 14th, 2006 at 12:17:15 PM EST
kudos to nanne and gaianne for their pointing to the real issue: scaling back demand, thoroughly and fast.

I thought the real issue in this case is the claim that, even if we stopped all CO2 emissions today, the current elevated levels and the greenhouse effect would continue unabated for decades.

But I have no interest in living through "Dr. Strangelove: how I learned to stop worrying about CO2 love Acid Rain."

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Oct 14th, 2006 at 12:24:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
thanks for relinking to deanander's april diary, and the great comments appended to it, migeru.

may we all strive for such a coherent overview as she consistently brings to our table.

as for the claim of current greenhouse effects continuing unabated, they are probably right, yet i believe there is much more that we don't know, than that we do, so the old uncertainty principle kicks in and, rightly or wrongly, time alone will tell, i manage to get a few more hours of good sleep!

denial is cheap, yup, but doom can warp our minds too.

although after a flagellation session of global worry, if kept up long enough can lead to a desperate wish to have as much fun as poss before we all go down in a mess of charred feathers...

which is why i spend more time here and less time making art than i used to.

as sven said here recently, becoming more intelligent is not a guarantee of happiness,

but when there is an opportunity to question and learn in such an amusingly snarklaced atmosphere, my little intellect is constantly stroked and tickled into growth, and that's a Good Thing, as it feels very understimulated still, though thanks to dial up and the internet a lot of progress has been made.

and most of all by finding such a bright group of people as those gathered here at et.

smart ain't the word, informed and caring too.

special thanks to you migeru for all you do to keep the top whizzing, i know i've made some thoughtless comments here that have justly ticked you off, and i apologise.

you are one of the funniest posters here, and i can't imagine this place without you.

it may well be true that the gods wish to destroy me, but i want to be just mad enough to laugh while they're doing it!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Oct 15th, 2006 at 01:37:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A situation with less acid rain than we have today would be Strangelovian? I wouldn't mind that aspect, but complacency about rising CO2 looks like a major problem.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.
by technopolitical on Sun Oct 15th, 2006 at 02:22:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Rising CO2 plus rising SO2 cannot be good for ocean acidification.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Oct 16th, 2006 at 04:11:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Rising SO2? Given general trends, why would there be an increase?
-----------------------

There's an acidification concern here, not because of a delay in ongoing reductions of SO2, but because of reduced motivations to reduce CO2.

And that poses a problem, because it is hard to argue to people that they shouldn't do X because it will make Y less painful, and we want the pain caused by Y to make them do Z.

Here, X = SO2 cooling, Y = CO2 increase, Z = CO2 emission reduction.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.

by technopolitical on Mon Oct 16th, 2006 at 04:16:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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