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2008: are you telling me that it's already too late to speak about policy because it could threaten chances of victory? ;-)

No what I'm saying is that no politician will say anything of substance over the next two years (especially if it implies taxes or sacrifice). There is no reason why the blogosphere can't keep the issue moving forward. There have been successful grassroots movements in the past (like the 40 hour work week), just not recently (in the US).

Why can't all of you based in Europe put together proposals similar to the effort you did for the US? The first step might be an energy inventory. For example what are the actual amounts of energy that could be generated from existing technologies if they were fully implemented?

How much wind, tide, solar, coal, nuclear, etc. is realistic over, say, the next 20-30 years? How much energy use will there be given current trends, and how much could conservation change this?

Even if the answers turn out to be unpleasant, it is better to face them now and start to adjust goals than to just throw up one's hands at the size of the problems.

Policies not Politics
---- Daily Landscape

by rdf (robert.feinman@gmail.com) on Fri Nov 10th, 2006 at 11:32:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Energy policy is vital, and hence absolutely not an EU issue but a national one. On top of that it is a highly emotional issue (Austria: NO NUKES!, France: ONLY NUKES!). Furthermore, many EU states have completely opposite national energy interest. Just compare the position of Poland and Sweden versus Germany and France on the Nord Stream (Baltic sea) gas pipeline.

Another problem is that all EU commission energy policy has the sole effect of making everything worse by implementing purely ideologic neoliberal contraproductive policies.

So leave energy issues to the Member States. Those who have succesful policies will be role models for the others to follow.

Of course, volontary cooperation is a great idea. That's what EURATOM is for.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Fri Nov 10th, 2006 at 02:36:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Another problem is that all EU commission energy policy has the sole effect of making everything worse by implementing purely ideologic neoliberal contraproductive policies.

So leave energy issues to the Member States. Those who have succesful policies will be role models for the others to follow.

There will be an EU energy policy, so you're better off trying to steer the process of adopting one than dismissing it off-hand on the asusmption that Sweden is going to be allowed to develop ts national model and serve as a role model to the rest.

Most of our economy/finance ministers are neoliberals anyway.

The EU's Energy White paper is expected in December. We'll see how much neoliberal nonsense there is in it, and how much resistance national governments put up.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 10th, 2006 at 04:17:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
... the dreaded "s" word.

First a bunch of foreign policy stuff on the "we're better than that" theme, including a good helping of feel good stuff to convince the folks assembled that there was this time that America did all this good stuff and we have to go back to that. And then,

6:00 to 7:01. John Edwards NH AFL-CIO, American Labor Day

"... If you say that we can solve this problem with just that, its not the truth ... and we know its not the truth. Its time to call on America to be patriotic about something more than war. We ought to ask the American people to sacrifice for the good of their country, for the good of their children and their grandchildren. We can't continue to drive around in vehicles that get 10 miles to the gallon [4.2 km/litre]. We can't continue to consume energy, the way we are today.

And we, our party, we need to tell the country the truth about this, and lead it in a different direction."

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Sat Nov 11th, 2006 at 03:52:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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