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by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 12:33:39 AM EST
Le Figaro: Chirac's planned birthday dinner with Putin upsets NATO summit

Jacques Chirac is faithful in friendship, but he had planned to celebrate his 74th birthday the evening of November 29th, in Riga, where the NATO summit ...

Jacques Chirac is faithful in friendship, but he had planned to celebrate his 74th birthday the evening of November 29th, in Riga, where the NATO summit is being held, with a rather awkward friend, Vladimir Putin. But yesterday evening the Kremlin finally announced that the Russian president would "unfortunately" not be at the celebration. The deputy spokesperson for the Kremlin, Dmitriy Peskov, explained in Moscow that discussions had indeed taken place regarding such a trip. "But unfortunately, given the impossibility of coordinating the schedules of the heads of state, ultimately this trip will not take place," he said in very diplomatic terms. It must be noted that the possibility of this three-person dinner (since Latvia's President Vaira Kike-Freiberga was to be among the guests) provoked the anger of American President George Bush on Sunday  November 26th. Embarrassed by the scale assumed by this affair, the Latvian president then hesitated about issuing a visa to Vladimir Putin, thereby managing to offend the sensitivity of the Russians.

In fact, initially Vaira Kike-Freiberga had planned to make a gesture at one time or another "to wish a happy birthday" to the French president "with the heads of state and government present." The summit was to conclude with a lunch offered to her guests by the Latvian president. But the announcement of the Chirac-Putin dinner had upset this nice schedule.

According to Alliance officials, initially the French president wanted to celebrate his birthday in an Armenian restaurant in Riga, with his closest European partners and his Russian counterpart, but without Tony Blair or George W. Bush. Upon learning this, the American President reportedly intervened to block this plan. The Elysee [the president's office] presented a very different version yesterday: "President Putin expressed the wish to come meet the president of the Republic to offer his best wishes, as he has done with other heads of state and government," and "the idea was suggested by Russia of a three-person dinner, hosted by the president of Latvia."


by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 12:43:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just so no one gets the wrong idea about what NATO is all about.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 01:25:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This whole thing is hilarious. Chirac might as well have thrown a stink bomb during the NATO meeting.

Gawd diplomacy can be petty.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 03:59:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yet another Chirac's poorly thought out antic. Hoewever I appreciated Kike Freiberga's determination to keep Putin at bay refusing him visa. Even the smallest ones can change the course of future. Bravo.
by FarEasterner on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 04:41:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
George isn't ready for a new Yalta
by oldfrog on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 06:36:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Independent: Lord Ramsbotham exclusive: Justice system is absurd. Broken. Chaotic

The former prison chief lambasts a justice system in meltdown after Tony Blair's decade of failure on crime and punishment

 Yesterday's announcement that the prison population now exceeds 80,000 is the latest low point in what one can only describe as the Government's headlong and self-induced race to absurdity as far as the conduct of imprisonment is concerned.

The reasons for this dreadful figure are not hard to find. If you produce legislation that results in longer prison sentences, more people will be in prison. If you do not resource prisons, to enable them to conduct work, education and training, prisoners are more likely to reoffend, as proved by the fact that the reoffending rate among adult males has gone up from 55 per cent to 67 per cent in the past five years. If you continue to have a dysfunctionally organised prison service, you will continue to have dysfunctional organisation of an overstretched system. And so on.

Many people have been warning the Government about this for years but, instead of listening to those with practical experience, it has preferred to take advice from people who know nothing about running large organisations, let alone an operational service. When, as now, the whole is run by a home secretary who, within weeks of taking office, publicly described the Home Office and the overburdened immigration service as not being fit for purpose, and recently disparaged the probation service to prisoners in Wormwood Scrubs, you do not exactly have a recipe for getting out of what is an increasingly dire situation. Leaders undermine the morale of their own troops at their peril. If, at the same time, you continue to bombard them with a continuous torrent of flawed legislation, much of which replaces previous legislation before the ink on it is dry, you create a mess that can only be cleared up by long-term planning, based on discussion with those who understand not only what needs to be done but how it might be done. That requires ditching current plans that are marching the whole system into even greater chaos.

by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 12:45:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We have the exact same problem in France. After years of tough talk, tougher laws, and dismantlement of all the soft mechanisms that allowed to deal with crime (prevention, parole, etc...), of course the situation is worse.

Brute force sovles very few problems. But it's the only thing that is talked about.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 04:02:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I read somewhere that the Blair government, in less than 10 years, has passed more penal laws than had been enacted in the previous century.

It is the same pattern of change for the sake of change and legislate new laws instead of operating the existing ones effectively, that makes the Blair regime so ineffective administratively.

by Gary J on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 06:46:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's because there's also this idiocy of evaluating the value of legislators' work by the number of laws enacted. "Is this what we pay MPs for?" kind of crap.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 07:10:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Unfortunately it's not ineffective. It's been very effective - at breaking things and wasting time on trivial plays for the Daily Mail crowd.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 07:34:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And do not forget that if you have enough laws, everybody is guilty.

Which can be an end in itself.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 07:40:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That is why I wrote ineffective administratively. It is (at least for a time)  effective politically, but it is not good government.
by Gary J on Fri Dec 1st, 2006 at 03:46:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Shami Chakrabarti : Director of Liberty comments:-

"Before you decide whether the system is fit for purpose you have to decide what that purpose is.

In this country there is too much pressure on the criminal justice system because it is supposed to solve society's ills. But it is not the answer to everything; it can't be used to cope with the mentally ill, the homeless and problem teenagers. That's not what it is designed for; it can never be fit for that purpose. Politicians have created a panic about crime so the public now fear there won't be enough space in prison for all the people who are guilty of offences. They have trapped themselves in a debate where they tell the public there is nothing wrong with the system, then enact more criminal laws to change it."

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/crime/article2026804.ece

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 09:10:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Deutsche Welle: EU Commission Suggests Halting Part of Turkish Accession Talks

The European Commission on Wednesday called for a partial suspension of Turkey's negotiations towards European Union membership after Ankara refused to open its harbors and airports to Greek Cypriot ships and planes.

"We are going to recommend suspending the chapters of negotiations which are connected with commercial restrictions on Cyprus, which is between four and nine chapters out of 35," a

Commission source said.

"Turkey has undoubtedly made progress. But it has still not implemented all obligations it has agreed to," said Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso.

A spokesman for the Turkish representation to the EU in Brussels, Caglar Cakiralp, said eight "chapters," or policy areas into which the accession talks are divided, would be suspended.

He added that he considered the move too harsh.

"It means you suspend nearly the whole process," he said. "It's too much."

by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 12:47:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is another of those situations where everybody knows what the final solution will look like, nobody disputes that resolving the issues in that way will be a good thing.

Yet somehow the vanity of politicians prevents them taking unpopular decisions that will ultimtely be to everybody's benefit. where do we find these people ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 09:34:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's mostly posing for elections next year.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 09:56:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Deutsche Welle: Commission Cracks Down on EU Carbon Credit Give Away

On Wednesday, the European commission demanded from some EU counties, including Germany, to cut carbon credit permits for 2008-2012, under its European Trading Scheme (ETS), after over-supplying emission rights.

The ETS aims to reduce greenhouse gases by 8 percent by 2012 as it promised under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on climate change. The scheme, established last year and ending in 2007, aims to reduce carbon emissions by providing a market-based trading system. It is based on limiting the total amount of CO2 emissions, but can offer control over reductions flexibly and at a low-cost.

It is designed to put caps on the amount of carbon dioxide emitted by heavily polluting factories across Europe. But in 2006, the governments of some EU countries gave away free carbon pollution permits that exceeded the amount of pollution that was released -- which the European environment commission has decided to put a stop to.

Germany was the most generous, with France and Poland also handing out carbon credits faster than pollution can be emitted. Only a few countries -- such as Britain and Ireland -- distributed allowances that fairly matched the needs of big companies.

EU environment commissioner Stavros Dimas criticized several European countries, including Germany, Greece, Ireland, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Slovakia and Sweden, for giving away too many pollution allowances that they hold in reserve for building new factories.

by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 12:49:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC: EU embarks on tough carbon cuts

The EU has set tough carbon limits under the European Trading Scheme's second phase, to the consternation of some of the 10 states involved.

To make the scheme effective in tackling climate change, the EU has cut member states' carbon permits by 7% on average from 2008-2012.

Germany, a major polluter, said the stricter limits were unacceptable and would push electricity prices up.

Critics have accused nations of making carbon allowance levels too high.

The European Trading Scheme (ETS) aims to cut emissions by 8% of 1990 levels.

'Level playing field'

"Today's decisions send a strong signal that Europe is fully committed to achieving the Kyoto target and making the ETS a success," said EU Environment Commissioner Stavros Dimas.

This view was echoed by Michael Grubb, head economist of the UK's Carbon Trust: "They have done a lot to create a level playing field."

by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 01:02:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Guardian: US threatens legal action over carbon emissions proposals

· Including airlines 'will push up cost of flights'
· EC says current system is not a level playing field

The EU is heading for a legal showdown with the US and Asia over plans by the European commission to bring all international flights to and from Europe into its carbon emissions trading scheme (ETS), its main weapon for fighting climate change.

Senior US sources warned yesterday the proposal to extend the ETS from heavy industry and power plants to civil aviation within the EU breached the 1947 Chicago convention on international air travel and would not survive legal challenges.

But Stavros Dimas, EU environment commissioner, insisted his plan, due to be adopted by the full commission on December 12, was compatible with the rules of the International Civil Aviation Organisation. He said it was being drawn up after consulting senior lawyers and all challenges would fail.

Philippe Varin, chief executive of steel group Corus, claimed the scheme needed to be tightened and widened if it was to be effective.

by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 01:38:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the US would play merry hell if we tried to stick our noses into their domestic taxation arrangements, even when they impact our companies.

But somehow it seems perfectly reasonable for the owners to complain if the serfs get uppity.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 09:14:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EUObserver: Germany clashes with Brussels over Emissions Plan
Germany has reacted with irritation to a European Commission decision to slash its allowances to emit greenhouse gasses, calling the move "adventurous" and terming Brussels' handling of the issue as "the opposite of transparency."

EU environment commissioner Stavros Dimas on Wednesday (29 November) told Germany and eight other member states that their national pollution-reducing plans for the are too weak, demanding from Berlin that it reduce its carbon emissions by six percent to 453.1 million tonnes per year.

But FT Deutschland reports that Germany - the biggest polluter in the EU - immediately called Brussels' move into question with German environment minister Sigmar Gabriel calling the decision an "adventurous procedure."

This is great! For the first time in a long time, I'm cheering the Commission on...
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 08:02:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC: Sarkozy declares presidential bid

France's Interior Minister Nicolas Sarkozy has declared his intention to run for the presidency next April.

The announcement had been widely expected, and Mr Sarkozy is the favourite to win the election, according to recent opinion polls.

His centre-right UMP party is due to select its candidate in January and President Jacques Chirac is not expected to seek a third term.

Whoever wins the UMP's race will face the Socialist Party's Segolene Royal.

"I feel I have the strength, the energy and the desire to propose a different view of France," Mr Sarkozy said in an interview to be published in a number of regional newspapers on Thursday.

"I have the ambition to develop a new relationship with the French based on two words: confidence and respect. Confidence in pledges made and respect for every Frenchman considered individually."

by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 01:00:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Libération has scooped him out by publishing his interview with other papers earleir than expected, so this is not making a lot of waves. Plus it's not like it's a surprise in any way.

I note that his slogan "rupture tranquille", while absurd on its face, hints at Mitterrand's "force tranquille", a interesting and unexpected move.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 04:05:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
what do the slogans translate to in English Jerome?

Money is a sign of Poverty - Culture Saying
by RogueTrooper on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 05:24:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
force tranquille would be quiet, or steadfast, force.

rupure tranquille would be the same with rupture. It makes no sense, but it rings bells.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 06:39:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Times Online: 'London's bridge is falling down'

# Damning verdict on one-sided US-UK relations after Iraq
# State Department official says Blair is ignored by Bush

Timeline

In a devastating verdict on Tony Blair's decision to back war in Iraq and his "totally one-sided" relationship with President Bush, a US State Department official has said that Britain's role as a bridge between America and Europe is now "disappearing before our eyes".

Kendall Myers, a senior State Department analyst, disclosed that for all Britain's attempts to influence US policy in recent years, "we typically ignore them and take no notice -- it's a sad business".

He added that he felt "a little ashamed" at Mr Bush's treatment of the Prime Minister, who had invested so much of his political capital in standing shoulder to shoulder with America after 9/11.

Speaking at an academic forum in Washington on Tuesday night, he answered a question from The Times, saying: "It was a done deal from the beginning, it was a onesided relationship that was entered into with open eyes . . . there was nothing. There was no payback, no sense of reciprocity."

His remarks brought calls from British politicians last night for the special relationship to be rethought, but also attracted scathing criticism from one close supporter of the Prime Minister.

by Fran on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 01:06:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
for all Britain's attempts to influence US policy in recent years, "we typically ignore them and take no notice -- it's a sad business".

It's not just "recent years". It's the story of US/UK relations since WWII.

And for this the UK will go on snubbing Europe?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 01:49:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"He only hits me because he loves me. It's my fault really."
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 02:24:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Stop being anti-American. Or anti-British. Or both. Stop hating people who speak English. It's not nice.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 04:07:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
K'es ki dit, l'monsieur?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 03:34:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's the sad state of affairs that the constituency that is seen as being possible to swing between the two main parties is that of the readers of the daily mail, due to which a ludicrous selection of policies get enacted in this country.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 05:51:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The government seems to be owned by the arms trade and the City. They're the only sectors that make any money out of the 'special relationship' and the only ones who can make it look justifiable on something that might resemble rational grounds if you squint hard and do lots of drugs.

Politically it makes no sense at all. You can understand Thatcher and Reagan cosying up, because they were opportunists of a feather. But ten years ago the idea that Blair would ever have hitched his star to Bush's rickety wagon would have seemed ridiculous to most people.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 07:40:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The strangest thing is that I have found nothing but the most open contempt for George Bush and his policies in the City. I don't usually bring up the topic myself, but have found myself quite surprised to hear near universal contempt from British bankers for both Bush and Blair on the Iraq adventure - and not just in the past few months, that's been over the last 3 years.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 10:01:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The trouble is that the British political establishment are all star-crossed lovers of America.

We could use some clear-eyed realists in govt, not dewy-eyed romantics forever blind to the other's ills.

I find their pro-US syconphancy sickening. Not because I dislike the US : I dont. But because we are a european nation and this mooning across the atlantic makes us look pathetic.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 09:26:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If you're a European nation why do Commonwealth citizens get voting rights in the Westminster elections, but not EU citizens?

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 09:32:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Dunno. I imagine it's cos we're still notionally a monarchy and so all subjects of the Crown (inc commonwealth) have some form of voting right here.

But I don't really know. Anyway, as a spanish citizen, you can vote in spain and I won't be able to even when I move there. I'm not surprised it works the other way too.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 09:54:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
According to this (PDF)
These countries give you voting rights after a set period:
Belgium Denmark Estonia Finland Ireland Lithuania Luxembourg  Netherlands Slovenia Sweden
regardless of nationality.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 10:09:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well that is wrong when it comes to Sweden and national elections.

Local and regional you get to vote after living a certain time in Sweden, but for the national parliament citizenship is required.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 10:34:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It is possible that the list is only for local elections. That seems to be the case in Belgium, too.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 10:53:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And in France. Local and European (this includes eligibility).
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 03:47:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If by "London Bridge" they mean Britain's role as a bridge between America and Europe, I suppose a better headline would be "Trojan Horse is Burning Down"?

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 05:27:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No hope of improvement...
Sir Menzies Campbell, the Liberal Democrat leader, said: "These remarks reflect a real sense of distaste among thinking Americans for Mr Blair's apparent slavish support for President Bush . . . The special relationship needs to be rebalanced, rethought and renewed."


Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 11:03:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
La Stampa and Corriere della Sera have finally gotten around to seriously covering Scaramella- a job done only by la Repubblica the past ten days.

Both papers reveal that Scaramella has been under investigation since January at the least. Transcripts of legally obtained taps have been leaked to both papers.

The excerpts indicate a conscious scheme on Scaramella's part to beaf up false evidence against Romano Prodi, Alfonso Pecoraro Scanio (head of the Greens and now Minister of the Environment) and Antonio Bassolini, president of the Campania Region. In a conversation with Senator Paolo Guzzanti, Scaramella volunteers unsubstantiated charges against Pecoraro Scanio immediately after a violent diatribe in TV between Guzzanti and Pecoraro Scanio. Scaramella accused Bassolino and Pecoraro Scanio of being linked to the camorra and the KGB.

Scaramella used Litvinenko as a source that Prodi was a KGB informant. Litvinenko had always denied being Scaramella's source and further accused Scaramella of having tricked him into signing false revelations.

It has also been revealed that one of Scaramella's consultants was Bob Lady, the Milan CIA agent wanted for the Abu Omar kidnapping. A second CIA agent who collaborated with Scaramella is not named.

Other revelations have Scaramella allegedly sabotaging the San Marino investigation into a possible international arms trade involving Switzerland. By publicizing that investigation as a Russian "KGB" operation, Scaramella blew the investigation apart.

There are wire taps on Ukranian and Russian spies or criminals, such as Alexander Talik, that indicate bewilderment on their part over Scaramella's actions.

In a conversation with his wife, Scaramella tells her that the Teramo scam reported yesterday (in which hapless Ukranians were arrested for transporting Russian grenades to a Neapolitan address) had nothing to do with Guzzanti. The Berlusconi press campaign had trumpeted the story as an attempt to kill Guzzanti and Scaramella. Both received police escorts after that campaign.

A conversation in mid- February  2006, between Guzzanti and Scaramella shows that Scaramella knew he was being tapped. Investigators are presently seeking to discover who was Scaramella's informant within the Interior Ministry. Neither article points to the unprecedented Telecom wiretapping scandal that involves Tavaroli, Mancini and Cipriani.

Although Berlusconi is never named it is apparent from the conversations that Guzzanti met and discussed Scaramella's hokum with him and received encouragement to immediately publicize the false accusations against Prodi.

Public Ministers have asked parliament for authorization to use the taped conversations. By law any conversation with a member of parliament or in which the name of an MP is mentioned (a Berlusconi law) must have authorization by the parliament to be used in an eventual trial. Criminal elements need only drop the name of an MP to complicate any investigation.

By publishing these leaks, both the Corriere and the Stampa have once again joined in the battle against parliamentary attempts to limit press freedom.

by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 06:37:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Can you put this into a diary? I'll front page it. This is just too steamy...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 11:27:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Public Minister i.e., prosecutors?

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 11:40:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 04:20:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
RTE News: Gaidar family suspects poisoning (30 November 2006)
The family of former Russian Prime Minister Yegor Gaidar - who collapsed during a visit to Ireland last Friday - believes he was poisoned.

Mr Gaidar, who had been treated in a Dublin hospital after becoming ill during a conference in NUI Maynooth, is now being treated for a mystery illness in a Moscow hospital.

The Kremlin has said President Vladimir Putin telephoned Mr Gaidar at the hospital in Moscow yesterday and wished him a speedy recovery.



Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 02:09:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
RIA Novosti: Doctors deem poisoning cause of Gaidar's illness - press-secretary (30/11/2006)
Doctors say the illness of post-Soviet Russian reformer Yegor Gaidar was caused by poisoning, but have not identified the poison, his press secretary said Thursday.

"This is not poisoning by spoilt food products," Valery Natarov said.

Gaidar's daughter Maria said her 50-year-old father and former acting prime minister started vomiting and fainted at a conference in Dublin Friday, and remained unconscious for three hours. Gaidar was taken to a hospital in Dublin and later transferred to Moscow.



Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Nov 30th, 2006 at 02:10:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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