Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
I think the number of Americans who actually have any clue that Turkey is up for EU membership is very small -- the blogs and newspapers aren't good samples.

Also, weren't the same issues of infrastructure and cost, etc. all played out as the former Soviet satellites joined the EU?

by R343L (reverse qw/ten.cinos@l343r/) on Mon Dec 11th, 2006 at 08:18:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The reason the accession of the Central/Eastern European countries was done so hurriedly (fredouil mantions Turkey being large, poor, extremely nationalistic and not prone to compromise - which unfortunately describes Poland) is partly to do with trying to prevent disillusion with democracy to set in in these countries if they had been told they had to sit out in limbo for another 10 years. Turkey is not a new country or even a new regime: it's been around in essentially the same form for 80 years.

The idea that accession would help bring these countries more in line with EU standards has been proven false, though. Accession candidates have every incentive to do what the EU tells them to satisfy accession criteria, but once they're in they get the carrot and the EU loses the stick (or they get a stick, too), so accelerated accession was probably a mistake on that account, too.

But, like I say in another comment, Turkey won't join the EU for another 15 years at least, so I don't see any rush.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Dec 12th, 2006 at 05:32:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I only brought up the eastern bloc states as a counter to the argument that Turkey is different economically -- it seems quite similar in a lot of ways. But clearly it is seen as a mistake or rushed by some, so Turkey would be too. :)

Rachael

by R343L (reverse qw/ten.cinos@l343r/) on Tue Dec 12th, 2006 at 12:12:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series