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No, I'm not saying they lack editorial lines.

I am saying that they must, however, respond to market forces.  The owners' interests are served by earning more profit.  It just so happens that, in the case of (say) Murdoch, the conservative line was a money-maker for several years, and he was thus able to serve his ideological interests along with his microeconomic interest.  The problem for Murdoch is that this is no longer much of a money-maker, and we see that reflected in Fox's fall in the ratings.  In contrast, Keith Olbermann -- who, of course, takes a more liberal line (not that "more liberal" tells you much when compared to the extremism at Fox) -- is enjoying huge gains over at MSNBC, as is, I think, Matthews.

Clear Channel was looking for ratings when it ran the 1,000 unAmerican songs gig.  It was capitalizing on the post-9/11 mentality the public was stuck in.  As we all know, this was done by many people shortly after 9/11 and all the way up to the 2004 election.  I haven't the slightest idea as to which songs were on the CC program, but I suspect the company would be far less likely to get away with it today.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Wed Dec 27th, 2006 at 02:19:29 PM EST
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Things like "A day in the life" by The Beatles were among the 1000 unamerican songs, as well as many others that I have no clue why were unamerican. The whole thing was insane. To think that knowing about the list (I don't think many people did) would not turn people off from Clear Channel's radio stations gives me the creeps. Meantime, you couldn't escape Lee Greenwood wherever you tuned.

Now, are you also going to say talk radio just mirrors the audience's opinions and doesn't create them?

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 27th, 2006 at 02:43:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Lee Greenwood.  Yes.  I was a fan of that song until I discovered what a little Nazi he was (or had become after 9/11).

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Dec 28th, 2006 at 10:31:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I should note that I was a fan of the music to the song, not the unbelievably cheesy lyrics.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Thu Dec 28th, 2006 at 10:31:36 PM EST
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I'm relieved.

Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Dec 29th, 2006 at 05:59:54 AM EST
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I suppose this means you're right, however:
While rumors initially floated that the list was a corporate mandate, or a cruel hoax, the radio conglomerate insists that a program director created and distributed the list to its 1,100 stations, including KIIS-FM in Los Angeles and Z100-FM in New York.

"Given the environment, a Clear Channel program director took it upon himself to identify a number of songs that certain markets or individuals may find insensitive today," the company said in a statement. "This was not a mandate, nor was the list generated out of the corporate radio offices. It was a grassroots effort that was apparently circulated among program directors."

Not all Clear Channel stations are paying attention to the list. For instance, New York's Z100 has been playing many of the tunes, while Q104 has noted that "inappropriate" songs like "New York, New York" and "Imagine" were some of the most requested of the week.



Those whom the Gods wish to destroy They first make mad. -- Euripides
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Dec 27th, 2006 at 02:53:20 PM EST
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