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Well, it's true that nuclear plants can be built pretty quickly if there's a standardized design and a streamlined approval process--neither of which is in place in the U.S. today. But even so it takes a few years to do the construction.

Electric cars with moderate range (100 miles) are completely practical today. Recent progress in battery technology has been very rapid, and there's nothing particularly difficult about making the car itself.

Electric trains are already in use. It would be very expensive to electrify the railways in the American west because of the distances, but again there's nothing particularly difficult about it.

A big problem would be to migrate from our current goods hauling system based on trucks, which give flexible point-to-point pickup and delivery, to a rail-based system that requires two intermodal transfers (from truck to train, then from train to truck.) Ideally all the big warehouses would be on rail lines, like they were until about 1950.

by asdf on Tue Feb 28th, 2006 at 10:54:19 PM EST
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Electric cars use electricity guys - so, again we are facing with the question of nuclear energy. And though it is environmentally friendly during operation, mining and disposal of uranium is not.

About the edvanced battery technology - this is probably one of the few technologies that hasn't moved a lot during the past 100 years (i.e. since are used). Batteries are still using the same design and the only new thing is that they now come in different shapes and sizes (mind you, this is hard as well).

Be careful! Is it classified?

by darin (dkaloyanov[at]gmail.com) on Wed Mar 1st, 2006 at 02:18:06 AM EST
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