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Yep...I was born and bred in Dublin...as were my parents and 90% of my grandparents.
(90% - my grandmother was born in Limerick but grew up in Dublin!)
Colman is a blow in with an Irish passport.  Born in London to Irish parents and then they let him into the country 10 years later.


We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 05:39:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, so this is sort of a regional rivalry deal?

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 05:45:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep.  With parents from Mayo and Fermanagh he doesn't stand a chance.
Begorrah and bedehokey

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 05:50:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Poor, poor Colman. :)

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:17:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hi, Sam -

Sorry if I missed the answer to this question, but do you speak Irish then?

by slaboymni on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 05:49:40 PM EST
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It would take a little while for me to have a conversation in Irish now but I can read it and understand it.


We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 05:54:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Was/is it taught in school?

It sounds like you don't get many opportunities to use it.  Do most people not have your level of fluency or just choose not to speak it with others who can?

by slaboymni on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 05:55:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Irish is taught in school as a compulsary subject from the age of 5 until 17.  It's not spoken or used on a day to day basis in most of Ireland.  There are a few areas in the West of Ireland called The Gaeltacht (pronounced G-wale-tock-t) where Irish is the 1st language.  I used to attend mass through Irish in our local church which would have had people in the congregation speaking Irish to eachother before and after the mass.  Some schools teach their students through Irish.

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:02:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There is a long, sad, story of early 20th C nationalism that I could tell if I hadn't reached the Guiness-with-Jameson-pure-po-still-chaser stage of the evening . Irish is almost entirely an academic subject where a made-up dialect is taught and everyone pretends it's a living language.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:03:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Emmm...Colman, I think you mean 'poT' still.  Otherwise you may have to take mine back and pour me something else...

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:06:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Has there been a renewed interest in the recent past in reviving Irish?  Kind of like Welsh has been bouncing back lately?
by slaboymni on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:14:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They're trying to make it more popular...but they always are.  It was recently listed as an official language in Europe but that appears only to be causing headaches for the legal types who need to have their long sprawling documents translated into yet another language.

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:27:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wow, from the wikipedia entry for "Irish Gaelic":


 Since the State was founded in the 1920s as the Irish Free State (see also History of the Republic of Ireland), the Irish Government required a degree of proficiency in Irish for all civil service positions (including postal workers, tax officials, agricultural inspectors, etc.), as well as for employees of state companies (e.g. Aer Lingus, RTE, ESB, etc). Proficiency in Irish for entrance to the public service ceased to be a compulsory requirement in 1974, in part through the actions of protest organizations like the Language Freedom Movement. While the requirement was also dropped for wider public service jobs, such as teaching, Irish remains a required subject of study in all schools within the Republic which receive public money (see also Education in the Republic of Ireland). The need for a pass in Leaving Certificate Irish for entry to the Gardaí (police) was dropped in September 2005, although applicants are given lessons in the language during the two years of training. Most official documents of the Irish Government are published in both Irish and English.

So until Sept. of last year you had to know Irish to join the police force.

What do you think of the dropping of the language requirement for civil servants?

by slaboymni on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:31:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More jobs for Irishmen ;-)

I am generally very supportive of minority languages.  I really think having Irish as an official EU language could end up saving it from obscurity.

by slaboymni on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:34:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Juat like Batua basque and Nynorsk. You just need to give it another century.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:27:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And just to point out to the world in general...the Irish language is called IRISH...not GAELIC!!  And the country of Ireland is IRELAND not EIRE!!

Now...that feels so much better...

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde

by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:05:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gaelic is a Celtic language, isn't it?  I think some of the Scots speak it, though less and less so as time passes.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.
by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:16:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Based on this link I think Irish, Scottish, and Manx are all Gaelic languages.
by slaboymni on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:25:34 PM EST
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No...gaelic is really a blanket name for all the celtic languages.  Irish speakers and Scots Gaelic speakers would not necessarily understand each other.  As a matter of fact Irish speakers from the East and West of Ireland would have difficulty understanding each other.


We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Fri Mar 17th, 2006 at 06:35:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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