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I think there might have been a story by Colman a year ago about this.

Ok, here it is:

Colman: What power do we have? (August 3 2005)

One of the successes of dKos and our other colleagues in the US has been fund-raising for candidates, choosing and backing politicians running for office who would have been ignored by the official Democratic Party. The near-win of Paul Hackett in Ohio yesterday is perfect example.

This is possible because any US citizen is permitted to donate to campaigns. Due to the nature of the EU, it does not seem that we can do the same at the national or EU level. While the amounts of money involved in most European elections are smaller than in the US, fund-raising is still an important activity for parties in Ireland and the UK and I assume in other states.

...

Are hassling the media and harassing our representatives the only two levers of power available to us in Europe? Is this a good thing?



A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 06:14:16 AM EST
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This seems pretty unfair, given the $millions that lobbyists are permitted to invest in the influence of law-making.
by cigonia on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 07:05:01 AM EST
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You will notice if you read the diary that UK and Irish law is designed to make it easy for a company to donate to any political party (all they have to do is to pen an office in the appropriate country) while preventing individuals from doing it unless they are citizens or residents.

A stacked deck.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 07:07:21 AM EST
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