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It is not true in Swedens case. Anyone can for example donate to a political campaign.

Which I know because I am a flag-waiving member of The Pirate Party of Sweden which accepts international donations. And yeah, we checked that it is legal. Btw, we aim at having a european Pirate Party in the next EU elections.

</shameless selfpromototion>

I would say that a larger problem would be the aims and strategies of a trans-national political organisation. Political structures, organisations, experience and most debate are all national and different. There is no public EU-level organisations right now. But this is a chicken and egg situation, which can be solved. It is just a question of how.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 11:36:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We should revive Colman's story from last year and research what is and is notpossible in each EU member state. Then we can write to the European Commission asking them to harmonize campaign finance in a way that allows citizens to organize seamlessly across borders.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 11:39:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Excellent idea!

I think we should also add a part on every member state about election systems and how campaigns are normally financed.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 02:43:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Though I might add, that I suspect the letter to the commission might not do the trick, we will gain some insight in where the EU political system is pushable.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 02:49:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As I wrote in my diary Locustwatch Vision (October 24 2005)
EU legislative initiative is vested in the European Commission. To quote the Commission's own basic facts (emphasis mine):
Although the Commission has the right to take any initiative it considers appropriate to attain the objectives of the Treaties, most proposals are a response to legal obligations, technical requirements or to a specific request for action from another institution, a Member State or from the interested parties.
What this means is that the European Commission expects to be lobbied for new legislation.
Note that there is no pretense that proposals will be disinterested. If you think your needs as an individual or collective could be served by EU-level legislative action, you are expected to address the Commission with a request. At least that's my reading of it. And the commission is always talking about "stakeholders". An organized trans-national group which would like to constitute itself into a political party but is hindered by national legislation is a stakeholder and has a problem that can only be solved by EU-level legislative action and whose solution is consistent with freedom of movement, a leading principle of the EU.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 30th, 2006 at 04:28:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You wrote in the diary you link
If you like to, you are very velcome to donate. If you do it would also be terrific if you end your sum with .03 € cents or something close to it (that would be .04 $ cents), so that what comes via the Eurotrib can be seen (Thanks to DailyKos for that idea).
Has anyone used this mechanism?

Anyway, I visited the donations page and I saw the following little table on the right-hand-side:

Membership [medlemsantal]
v         11000
muf          8503
mp          7862
pp          7321
kdu          4620
and thought "that can't be right, you can't have 60% more members than the Christian Democrats"... but it turns out 'kdu' stands for "KDU youth organization", haha. Anyway, I am very impressed by the fact that you are within spitting distance of the Green party and the Communist party. And you said you estimated that at 8,000 members your penetration in Swedish society would be large enough to give you a good chance of breaking the 5% barrier.

Arrrr, me protagonist mates and beauties!

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jul 1st, 2006 at 03:13:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh those cents, well, ehm, I...

akward paus

...forgot. So I have not checked with the cashier. Been busy. Will check with the cashier (so much for followup).

Quickly skipping to next item at hand:
Christian Democrats in Sweden are named Kd. The 'u' is for 'ung' (young), not union. The youth organisations are there for reference and to have some organisations to pass. We have been sending pressreleases for every organisation we have passed. When we pass the Greens (sometime in July probably) we will send a big one.

Right now the projection lands us at about 9000 members by election day which should give us something around 5% of the votes (for those who are not privy to previous conversations this is based on the number of voters/members in other parties), sailing over the 4% threshold (5% threshold is Germany).

Of course there is always the possibility that the other parties triangulate us out of the picture by copying over positions. Which would be cool.

Arrr!

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Sat Jul 1st, 2006 at 09:42:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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