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Helen ordered a glass of your favourite 'stale ale' and I tasted it.  Delicious!!!  Don't remember the name of it though!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 09:12:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Duchess de Bourgogne (sp?)  It was stale?  

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire
by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:11:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's its designation, see my beer diary

http://www.eurotrib.com/story/2006/8/8/174720/7830

The first beers were brewed in open baths where wild yeasts would blow in from the fields. this created a vinegar like beer that had to be aged before it could be drunk. Hence beers called "Old", a slightly sharp hoppy beer, and a style no longer brewed in the UK called "Stale" (for those who know it this is the equivalent of a belgian "Lambic").

Actually having tasted it recently it's more of an Old than a stale, but never mind.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:17:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Aha. Lambic, I know...

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire
by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:23:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
La Gueuse? (Don't look it up in a Fr-Eng dictionary, you'll get the wrong idea...)
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 12:38:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is that a question?  

So, well, I had to look it up because I have no clue what you're talking about. This is funny:

courir la gueuse:  go looking for a bit of skirt (chase girls)

ET's doing wonders for my language skills...  


Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:04:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
La Gueuse is a lambic-type Belgian beer.

But the word means other things, including rascally wench. That's why I told you not to look it up. ;)

(As for courir la g..., the older sense is not as fluffy as a bit of skirt, more, well, rascally wench...)

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:08:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah, Gueuze...

You know, I've heard of chasing rascally rabbits, but not rascally wenches...

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 01:16:26 PM EST
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It's true you don't have to chase rascally wenches far. Unlike wascally wabbits.

Yes, it's spelled both ways, -z- and -s-, and you're probably right the -z- is more correct.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 03:25:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I've heard gueze pronounced as Hoyt-zuh where the first h is like clearing your throat.

Ah, Cantillon !!! - swoon

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 03:27:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Must be a Flemish word.

This Cantillon?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:24:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes, the very same. Very much an acquired taste tho

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:31:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I haven't tried enough Gueuze to acquire it. There are the fruit-flavoured kinds and the sweetened kinds too, that put me off at first tasting.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:03:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, as with everything there's good and bad.

Generally I'd recommend Liefman's fruit beers, raspberry or cherry. Go for the ones wrapped in paper that have no label. They are the one's with the full flavour. The labelled small bottles are filtered and a pale reflection of the originals.

Lindemans are okay, but they are noticeably sweeter and less charactered than liefmans. The peach one tastes like perfume, it's beer jim, but not as we know it.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 05:20:35 PM EST
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Lambic. Mmmmmm (though I've only had it bottled).
Still haven't found any Greene King that is sufficiently aged.
by northsylvania on Tue Aug 22nd, 2006 at 04:46:46 AM EST
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to be honest, I can't imagine draught lambic. It's best when it's 4 or 5 years old and nobody is gonna barrel it for that long. Tho...mmmm what an idea.

It's usually bottled after 2 - 3 and then it's the purhaser's responsibility to age it. Some bars in Belgium have lambics that are 15 - 20 years old I'm told.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue Aug 22nd, 2006 at 05:28:24 AM EST
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Ah yes!  It's coming back to me now.  I only had 2 pints in the whole day...not being a huge beer drinker...but I tasted lots of others.  That Rauchtbier was VERY interesting...it would be good with nice bread and cheese...I can still remember the smoky sausagey flavour!

We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. Oscar Wilde
by Sam on Mon Aug 21st, 2006 at 04:08:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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