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Haven't seen anything about occupying oilfields.  Protesters here typically just block access and throw rocks at PEMEX employees. They are currently camped out on top of a new PEMEX pipeline project that runs from the fields to the Dos Bocas port facility.  This as a result of losses due to the tremendous pipeline explosion that took place last year along the old pipeline. I arrived a few days after the explosion and you could see scorched palm trees over a 3km area.

Oil is mostly a negative here.  The industry does provide jobs, but most of the better ones go to non-Tabascanians who already work for PEMEX. There is widespread polution, and since the oil belongs to the Nation, the central Govt. sucks up all the profits, leaving little for PEMEX to run and maintain its operations (thus the explosion in a pipeline that hadn't seen a "pig" in over 30 yrs).  There is little evidence, from what I see and hear , that the State of Tabasco receives much benefit. It remains behind the rest of the country in infrastructure.  The little town I live in has no water supply (in a State that's mostly water) and no sanitary (waste water treatment) services.  

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears

by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Thu Aug 10th, 2006 at 12:57:33 PM EST
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Actually, I believe the recount is widespread (althought as pointed out above) not an actual large number of polling places are involved. I don't think there will be any recounting here in Tabasco.  El Peje won here handily, but in October it will all start again with elections for Governor, city mayors, and other local positions.  

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Thu Aug 10th, 2006 at 01:08:47 PM EST
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