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Where on Earth does the saying go 'en fuego'?

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 03:25:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In North America.

In 1994, when calling the highlights for a game in which Marv Albert described Sam Cassell as being "on fire", Dan Patrick said he was "el fuego", which he thought was Spanish for "on fire". A few months later, he received a letter from a Spanish teacher in Pennsylvania suggesting that he say that athletes are "en fuego" (on fire) rather than "el fuego" (the fire). Since then, Patrick has used "en fuego" on certain occasions when a player is said to be "on fire". Note that "en fuego" is an Anglicism in Spanish, since it is a literal translation from English, and other translations would be more fitting, e.g. prendido ("lit" or "fired up"). Patrick started using the "en fuego" phrase because he believed the standard "on fire" phrase had become cliché.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 03:54:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The couner of the phrase, Dan Patrick, is an ESPN sportscaster.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 03:56:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BTW, I can't believe you haven't heard this in SoCal but I did here in Yurp!

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 03:57:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
'en fuego' means 'in the fire' but whatever.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 03:58:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Treat it as an (American-)English expression, and you'll feel better :-) Reminds me that when I was in central Germany, I saw that "Gulasch" is a food name everyone knows, except it didn't denote the heavy soup from Southeastern Hungary from which it took its name (gulyás), but a kind of stew (incidentally also a Hungarian dish, but called pörkölt).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 04:23:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You don't even want to know what "goulash" was in the home I grew up in. (It involved a pack of elbow macaroni, a big can of Hunt's tomato sauce and three or four pounds of hamburger.) And, injury to insult, we actually used to call it "Hungarian goulash" and thought it was a nice change from "Eyetalian spaghetti."
by Matt in NYC on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 04:58:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No problemo.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 05:05:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Heh, then there is another one: Alf's "no problemo" became the common phrase "Null Problemo" in German.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 05:13:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The anglicism part reminds me of something I saw the other day. Standing in line at the supermarket I eavesdropped on two clerks teaching each other Spanish - or rather one, presumably an American born Latina, was teaching US spanish, the other, presumably an immigrant, was teaching standard Spanish - como se dice en latina (that was the word she was using), come se dice en espanol). (I don't speak any Spanish, but French is close enough for me to understand some)
by MarekNYC on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 04:07:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
New York Spanish has to be one of the biggest arguments against bilingual education in the (so-called) civilized world.
by Matt in NYC on Thu Jan 18th, 2007 at 05:03:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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