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apart from the popularness of the operation, you're going to need to ship in about twice as many trucks as are already in theatre, just to deal with the extended lengthy of the supply lines, on top of that you're going to need extra to cope with increased  losses. (this will be equally true going through Turkey

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 25th, 2007 at 05:27:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
popularness????

lets try poularity instead.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 25th, 2007 at 05:32:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If you operate out of Kuwait the supply lines won't be lengthened. And the Kuwaiti Army has 218 M1 tanks which might very well be leaseable...

I guess there are large supply depots in Kuwait anyway, and it's not like fuel is going to be a problem...

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Thu Oct 25th, 2007 at 05:48:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
well half of the supply is supposedly coming through Um-Quasar, so the lengthening of supply lines is real. It depends wether you can opperate out of Kuwait. If the Iranians have managed to shut the straits, that may be something that is of little help.

The big problem would be the military supplies. on a war footing just for the real troops you're going to need in the region of 20,000 tons of supplies per day then you have to supply the contractors on top of that. (so probably in the region of twice as much)

Getting the right sorts of fuel to the right places will be a problem. Fuels one of the biggest supply headaches. Without that the US militarys combat capability drops away very sharply.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 25th, 2007 at 06:09:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Forces operating out of Kuwait should be well supplied and could hold a corridor open northwards to supply the main forces in Iraq.

That is after all what they do today (or well, from Umm Qassr, byt the difference should not be big). This new situation with mugh greater insurgent activity could be countered with indiscrimante firepower.

Of course, there will be convoy losses, but that is not of great importance.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Thu Oct 25th, 2007 at 06:35:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
depends how big those losses are

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Oct 25th, 2007 at 06:38:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The casualties are not likely to be relevant from a military perspective, but from a political perspective a few thousand casualties over a few weeks might be problematic.

I would worry a lot more over naval casualties. Losing an aircraft carrier is not at all unimaginable.

Still, that would not be a critical blow either. From a military perspective.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Thu Oct 25th, 2007 at 06:52:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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