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It's a translation from a Finnish researcher - hormones are cell to cell messengers, and they come in 3 basic varieties - amine-derived, peptide and Lipid. I think the semi-hormone name is given to the derivatives of amino acids - but I am way out of my depth here.

Endorphins are polypeptides. Serotonin is a amino-derived neurotransmitter. Dopamine is both a hormone and a neurotransmitter. So it's all very confusing ;-) But that researcher always told me to make the distinction. Just following orders, sah!

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 10:03:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Your 'Finnish researcher' is free to call them whatever he feels like, even them little fookers. Especially if he/she one of those genetics who will decide the relative capabilities of the 'manufacturing centres' in the brain. That is, how much (if at all) of these hormones, semi-hormones and neurotransmitters will be produced. I mean, to manage to put endocrine glands producing hormones (such as, say, the thyroid gland)  right into the brain, probably next to the pituitary! That seems sensible indeed, if they do belong to one endocrine system, they just have to be situated in one place - in the brain, where else! But such experiments probably don't work properly at first and that is why such unique chemical substances as semi-hormones appear which, as it clear from their name work only part-time as hormones and the rest of time are just fucking around.
:)
by lana on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 10:53:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Dopamine is a hormone and a neurotransmitter. Half of one, half of the other. I guess that might make it a semi-hormone.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 12:02:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]
nah, that might not. But you may notice that almost all (if not all) neurotransmitters are hormones but not all hormones are neurotransmitters. Say, the hormone oxitocin which releases birth pain is a neurotransmitter while such hormone as estrogen is not. However your 'Finnish researcher' may try to turn it into neurotransmitter too -  he/she first should put ovaries into the brain ot dunno, glue them to the spinal cord and see what happen
:)
Have you ever thought about writing a book of comics called Semi-hormones or how our brain works?
:)
and publish it on the Lulu site (which is the best place for people struggling with graphomania and has, i believe, just been mentioned in this thread?)
by lana on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 05:58:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
graphomania

Excellent!  I can see the book cover.  But who would (or already has) writ()te(n) it?  I can see Dostoyevsky's beard (my fantasy image....hmmm...)

Maybe this image on the cover.



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 07:54:37 PM EST
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What about Eakin's The Gross Clinic

(I love that painting.)

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 08:59:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and publish it on the Lulu site

Imagine the vanity press money!

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 08:03:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Biotic entities are conservative.  They tend to latch onto something, such as Dopamine-as-hormone, and since the stuff is floating around - note the technical terminology!  ;-) - it gets used for other things.  Dopamine in its homeostasic role had to precede its use as a neuro-transmitter -- since it's hard for a species to evolve a Central Nervous System if all the individual members of that species are dead.  

I note the thalamus has been around far longer than higher brain functioning.

Thus there may have been co-evolution going on with D-as-H (body side) promoting D-as-NT (brain side) being used by the thalamus - the lazy sod - to keep things simple.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Nov 27th, 2007 at 07:43:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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