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Original content for the radio shows will initially be produced in five "core" languages - English, French, German, Spanish and Polish - and will be translated into Bulgarian, Greek, Hungarian, Portuguese and Romanian.

More core languages and translated versions will be added in the coming years so that by 2012, all official 23 EU languages should be covered.

management:

Deutsche Welle will ensure the editorial coordination of the project, while Radio France will be responsible for financial affairs and Radio Netherlands will run the web portal of the euro-station.


Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.
by marco on Fri Dec 14th, 2007 at 03:29:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I know many will disagree, but I have always felt it might be a good idea to introduce classes in esperanto for children across the EU. It would mean that when they met they would have at least one language in common and cold play and communicate. surely the basis of closer ties.

It's all very well to assume english as the default language in the EU, but experience tells me it's mighty rare east of vienna where german predominates. And that's not forgetting that most people are effectively monolingual.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Dec 14th, 2007 at 07:02:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Polish is quite a canny move. Although it's questionable how effective it will be at reaching the Hail Mary audience in Poland.

As an aside - I was in a local bank yesterday, and they had an ad on the wall for credit cards.

In Polish.

This is rural Wiltshire, and the only reason I can think of for having an ad in Polish is because someone has looked at the stats and realised that there's enough of a critical mass of Polish people here to make the ad worthwhile.

Which means immigration will have been huge - historically significant, and bigger than the influx of ex-pats after WWII.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Dec 14th, 2007 at 08:01:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
This is rural Wiltshire, and the only reason I can think of for having an ad in Polish is because someone has looked at the stats and realised that there's enough of a critical mass of Polish people here to make the ad worthwhile.

And perhaps a ploy to keep rich Poles from remigrating back to Poland:

Indeed, Britain may soon face a novel immigration problem. As Poland's economy has improved this year, immigration has slowed, which economists say could cause labor shortages in British industries.


Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.
by marco on Fri Dec 14th, 2007 at 08:28:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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