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The French love two-syllable words ending in "o". Ségo and Sarko join the ranks of metro, boulot, dodo, coco, facho, ecolo, sado, maso, reglo, anglo, franco, pseudo, mao, dodo.

It's just irrestible with these two names, and I don't think you should see more in the use of Ségo(lène) than this.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Mon Feb 26th, 2007 at 06:04:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, actually,nall through my school years I observed that boys were generally referred to by surname and girls by name. I never figured out where that came from, but I took it as a subtle indicator of sexism.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Feb 26th, 2007 at 06:10:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It was quite common when we had conscription to call people you knew well (but not intimately) by their names, as if they were surnames. In many jobs it's still like that, even using the "tu" thing !

I agree with Jerome for the "Sego and Sarko" short style !

"What can I do, What can I write, Against the fall of Night". A.E. Housman

by margouillat (hemidactylus(dot)frenatus(at)wanadoo(dot)fr) on Mon Feb 26th, 2007 at 06:15:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd much prefer to be called by my first name.  

I suppose it is sexist in that the last name connotes the formal and professional and the first name connotes the informal and personal.  It may also just have to do with the fact that women often take different last names when they marry, so for consistency's sake...  And we "get" our last names from fathers and husbands.  So it's not like they are illustrative of our independence.

Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities. -Voltaire

by p------- on Mon Feb 26th, 2007 at 06:28:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I always preferred to be called by me first name, and women in Spain don't take their husbands' names.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 27th, 2007 at 03:13:29 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Disagree.

How often is SR simply called "Royal" ?

How often is Sarkozy referred to as "Nicolas" ?

How often have we heard "Nico and Ségo" ?

There's an infantilising and patronising tendency in all this - to some extent.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Feb 27th, 2007 at 01:32:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nico coumld have been used - but it is not as distinguishable. I think that Ségolène, being quite rare, is a nice identifier.

I expect my youngest kids to be identified by their first names later in their lifes, rather than their family names...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue Feb 27th, 2007 at 09:18:02 AM EST
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