Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
Sego seems all over the place, with no real focus.  
Everybody gets his or her wish in Royal's platform, and the only subject left hanging is how to pay for it all. (One page of her "hundred points" that I picked at random included: raising the monthly minimum wage to fifteen hundred euros, which means a little more than two thousand dollars; raising the lowest retirement benefits by five per cent; raising benefits for the handicapped by five per cent; doubling the annual subsidy for schoolchildren; reducing bank charges; and guaranteeing housing for life.) Campaigning, she can sound like a social democrat one day and a socialist out of the nineteen-thirties the next. Sometimes she loves immigrants, sometimes she loves the police more. Sometimes she wants to pay businesses to provide job training for the unemployable, sometimes she wants to raise their taxes. Last month, the Party's chief economic adviser, Eric Besson, got so frustrated by her shifting stands that he quit both his job and the Party. She is "heavily incompetent," he said. "I wouldn't wish it on my country."
How can anyone really expect to get anything done if they present a program of 100 points?
by wchurchill on Mon Apr 16th, 2007 at 08:48:49 PM EST
Mitterrand's program in 1981 had 110 points. He certainly got a lot done...

Hell, 100 points barely fill the schedule of the legislative assembly for a couple years.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Apr 16th, 2007 at 09:02:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
sure, hundreds of bills are passed in the US Congress, and I would imagine most Parliaments around the world.  But when one is a leader, one normally puts together themes and programs that they can communicate and focus on.  The broad themes probably have many legislative bills that need to be passed.  Does Sego have such a clear message that she is running on?  She may, btw, and we're just not seeing it from our English press.
by wchurchill on Mon Apr 16th, 2007 at 09:13:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The 100 propositions are grouped into about 10 themes, and constitute the program of Segolène.

As for the tendency to say many, disjointed things, Sarko and Bayrou do exactly the same - Sarko often saying something and its contrary, while Bayrou doesn't even have a clear plan on how to apply its program. But, in a classic way, Ségo's faults are pointed out and not her adversaries'

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Apr 16th, 2007 at 09:45:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
if you have a link for the themes I would appreciate it.  English would be great, but I would work through the French.
by wchurchill on Tue Apr 17th, 2007 at 12:46:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
and I meant to add, thanks for the comments re; Sarko and Bayrou.  the english press is saying exactly the opposite, pointing out actually the focus and coherence of particularly the Sarko program--as you can see in the New Yorker article.
by wchurchill on Tue Apr 17th, 2007 at 03:00:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Top Diaries

Occasional Series