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by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:12:09 AM EST
German Minister Urges Reversal of Dual Citizenship Policy | Germany | Deutsche Welle | 24.04.2007
A public debate about the introduction of dual German citizenship has resurfaced after a senior Social Democratic Party (SPD) member demanded new incentives for foreigners to integrate into German society.

Ralf Stegner, interior minister in the regional state of Schleswig-Holstein, has urged conservative Chancellor Angela Merkel to rethink her position on dual citizenship, saying law-abiding foreigners should be given the chance to become German citizens while maintaining their original nationality.

"Those foreigners who are well-integrated, speak the German language and have an income of their own should be offered German citizenship," Stegner told the weekly Bild am Sonntag. "And that without the precondition of having to relinquish their original nationality first."

Latest available statistics show that in 2005 only about 110,000 foreigners applied to become German nationals -- a drop by almost 60 percent compared with the year 2000 when figures peaked in postwar Germany. At that time the previous SPD-led government made it easier for Germany's four million foreigners to become citizens of this country.

by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:14:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hooray for him! The dual citizenship law was made a big cultural war issue by the CDU, and they successfully blocked it.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 03:59:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
MEPs to vote on historic anti-piracy law - EUobserver.com
EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - The European Parliament is for the first time ever set to vote for EU-wide criminal penalties - including imprisonment - for crimes breaching intellectual property rights, but critics say the proposal is badly drafted and would affect millions of young Europeans including MEPs' own teenagers.

MEPs gathering in Strasbourg for their monthly plenary session are on Wednesday (25 April) expected to vote in favour of a first-reading report by Italian socialist MEP Nicola Zingaretti proposing criminal measures aimed at ensuring the enforcement of intellectual property rights across the 27-member bloc.

The report comes after the European Commission in April 2006 put forward a proposal for an EU-wide law in the area and is the first piece of EU draft legislation seeking to harmonise national criminal law in the union.

According to the commission, the range and value of pirated goods - from cars to cosmetics to DVDs - is on the rise in the EU and increasingly linked to organised crime.
by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:16:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
German-Born Ex-Guantanamo Inmate Publishes Memoir | Germany | Deutsche Welle | 24.04.2007
Former Guantanamo inmate and German-born Turkish citizen Murat Kurnaz has published a harrowing account of the time he spent in the notorious US prison.

Beatings, amputations and torture were parts of the excruciating daily routine with which Murat Kurnaz claims to have lived for almost 5 years. The 24-year old German-born Turk was a prisoner in Guantanamo Bay and the subject of a legal battle with the German government of the time, who, according to Kurnaz, failed to secure his release when they had the chance.

 

Bildunterschrift: Kurnaz claims he was even mistreated by German soldiers in Afghanistan

His memoir, entitled "Five Years of My Life," which hit German bookstands on Tuesday, paints a disturbing picture of Kurnaz' ordeal.

 

"I understood a long time ago what this prison was about," Kurnaz said. "They could do with us whatever they wanted."

 

Kurnaz was arrested in Pakistan shortly after the Sept. 11 attacks on the United States. Kurnaz insists he didn't travel to Pakistan to fight alongside al Qaeda, but rather to work for an Islamic "Salvation Army" to help the homeless, among others. Kurnaz claims he was "sold" to US soldiers by unscrupulous bounty hunters. He was then taken to Afghanistan, where he faced torturous interrogations.

by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:17:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Beatings, amputations and torture were parts of the excruciating daily routine with which Murat Kurnaz claims to have lived for almost 5 years.

I have no wish to denigrate what this poor man endured, but I think a sub-editor has become a little confused. Daily amputations ? For five years ? How much of him is left ?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:30:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wirtschaftswunder 2.0: German Economic Boom Creates Job Machine - International - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News

Experts in the government and academia are astonished over the strength of Germany's economic recovery. Unemployment is declining more rapidly and the government coffers are filling more quickly than during any other economic recovery in postwar German history. What's causing the powerful economic upswing?

 Construction of a new shopping center in Hanover: A boom unlike any seen in Germany in years The town of Friedrichsdorf in the Taunus Mountains north of Frankfurt is experiencing a boom of China-like proportions -- at least on a 50,000-square-foot industrial site on Max Planck Strasse. Here, pharmaceutical company Axicorp is producing low-cost drugs and registering impressive growth rates.

Holger Gehlhar, Axicorp's founder and owner, expects sales to jump from last year's figure of €50 million ($68 million) to €80 million this year, and he also plans to boost the workforce by 50 percent -- translating into 70 new jobs. "This year was the best in the five years since we have been in business," says Gehlhar.

Friedrichsdorf isn't the only place where the local economy is booming. In the southern Bavarian town of Kempten, Dachser, a logistics firm, plans to hire 1,000 new employees, including 400 in Germany alone. According to Bernhard Simon, the company's CEO, Dachser increased its staff by the same levels last year. By the end of this year, the family owned company will employ 8,600 in its domestic operations, and increase of more than 10 percent over 2005. "Our business is doing so well because our customers' businesses are doing well," says Simon.

by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:19:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
obviously.

After 15 years of squeezing labor costs, German companies have nothing left to cut?

Or there is the small thing that Germany is specialised in capital goods, and China and big chunks of Asia are in the midst of a huge industrial investment boom?

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 02:53:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think a not insignificant factor is the end of the "business strike": there was a government change, they can't expect any more grand policy changes, so investments went ahead. Another factor is the EU expansion.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:03:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We're also perhaps finally seeing the German economy emerge from "paying for reunification." There are still social costs to be worked out (c.f. migration patterns, destitution of some elderly in the East and unemployment levels in the East) but maybe things are mostly trending up again?
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:43:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Germans Bank on "Treaty" to Replace Doomed EU Constitution | Europe | Deutsche Welle | 24.04.2007
By calling it a "treaty," the current German EU presidency has begun reviving the stalled approval process for a new constitution for the union. But not everyone is happy about the strategy.

Chancellor Angela Merkel and other German officials are currently in talks with representatives from the bloc's other 26 members to try and hammer out an agreement before the German presidency ends at the end of June.

By leaving the word "constitution" out of the discussion, Merkel hopes to get her colleagues to agree on a document that lacks the grave connotations and still manages to give the EU an improved voting system based largely on population size, a president and a foreign minister -- even though they might not be called that.

Bildunterschrift: Großansicht des Bildes mit der Bildunterschrift:  Merkel has been discussing the idea with euroskeptics such as Klaus
"I consider it likely that symbolic elements like the words 'constitution' or 'constitutional' or the title 'foreign minister' will not be in the new treaty," Czech negotiator Jan Zahradil told Reuters news service after Merkel met Czech President Vaclav Klaus, a euroskeptic, last week.

"Maybe the position will be there without the title of minister," he added.

by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:23:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's not nice to say I told you so, but I told you so, here too.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:06:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It's all symbolic. Don't call the treaty a constitution in order not to raise the bar too much, and don't call the HRCFSP a "minister" in order not to make the EU sound like a State.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:56:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Embryo-cell vote spotlights MEPs' ethics - EUobserver.com
EUOBSERVER / STRASBOURG - MEPs are divided over EU rules on new types of treatment for diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer's, with conservative deputies calling for a blanket European ban on medicines developed through stem cell research, a practice that is illegal in some countries.

After a series of delays, the European Parliament is set to vote on Wednesday (25 April) on the new EU regulation on so called "advanced therapies" - gene therapy, adult stem cell therapy and tissue engineering.

All three of them are based on the principle of replacing the abnormal body parts (genes, cells or tissues) affected by various diseases with healthy ones.

The stem cell therapy is the most controversial as it can involve cells being extracted from human embryos - a practise illegal in some countries, such as Poland and Italy.

Still, experts argue that it is crucial for the treatment of blindness, spinal cord injury, as well as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

At the moment, rules on the authorisation of the new therapies vary across the EU's 27 member states and most stakeholders claim that such differences hamper research and prevent access for patients from some countries to modern medical treatment which could save their lives.
by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:25:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
An interesting issue. I love the idea of "ethically unaccepotable" products. How about the ethics of promoting suffering and death from curable disorders ?

Why do we need these superstitious goat-worshippers (or whatever jumped up hederow sprite they worship) to tell humanity how to deal with its issues ?

If they wanna follow the Bible, I want to see them follow ALL of it. No smorgasboard religions thank you, don't pick or choose they bits that fit your world projudices, go follow all of it. And when they realise how bloody contradictory, messed up, hate-filled, genocide encouraging, misanthropic it all is, maybe they'll just shut the f*ck up.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:46:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
And when they realise how bloody contradictory, messed up, hate-filled, genocide encouraging, misanthropic it all is, maybe they'll just shut the f*ck up.

Yes, but rather too many of them seem to like those parts the best of all.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 06:43:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EU commissioner backs Royal in French election - EUobserver.com
EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - Although Brussels is formally keeping quiet on who it would like to see win the French elections, certain individual commissioners have been less discreet.

Margot Wallstrom, the EU communications commissioner, has made an all-out plug for socialist candidate Segolene Royal in her blog.

In an entry posted on Monday, the day after presidential elections that saw Ms Royal go through to the second round run-off on 6 May against Nicolas Sarkozy, the commissioner wrote that she "cheered" the achievements of her fellow socialist politician.

Continuing her blog in French, Ms Wallstrom says that "maybe more than anything else, I was so happy to see that a woman will take part in the second round of the presidential elections."

Noting that there are women ministers in several governments, particularly in Finland, she emphasizes that this is the first time a woman has made it through to the second round in France.

"It's historic and I wanted, as a woman involved in politics, to pay homage to Segolene Royal and wish her 'good luck' for what comes."
by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:26:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd normally denounce this on principle, but after so many EPP help across the border also utilising commissioners and Barroso himself, some balance is needed...

Continuing her blog in French

Hehehe, what happened? And what did her blog's moderator say?...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:08:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Offshore abortion women's group is given licence again-Life & Style-Women-TimesOnline

An "abortion ship" is planning to sail to countries where the practice is illegal and take women out to sea for terminations after the Dutch Government lifted restrictions banning it from international waters.

Rebecca Gomperts, the director of Women on Waves, told The Times: "We have just received the licence and there are some restrictive conditions but, yes, we are going to prepare a new campaign, that is for sure.

"We are in touch with women's organisations in several different countries. There are still three countries where abortion is illegal in Europe but there are also invitations from Argentina and some other South American countries."

Under the terms of its licence, the group is able to sail under the Dutch flag in international waters and hand out "abortion pills" for women up to seven weeks pregnant, causing them to have a miscarriage.

[Murdoch Alert]
by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:30:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Moderate to be next Turkish president but tensions remain - Independent Online Edition > Europe

Turkey's governing party nominated a moderate as the man almost certain to become the country's next president yesterday, as it prepared to take over one of the most symbolic posts of the secular state.

Abdullah Gul, the Foreign minister, is regarded as a less confrontational figure than the Prime Minister, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has angered traditional secularists with his Islamist policies and had been expected to stand for the job.

Mr Gul promised yesterday that, if elected, he would follow the country's basic secular principles. "The president must be bound by the basic principles of the constitution," the Foreign minister said.

But his candidature failed to defuse tension with Turkey's secular elite, including the country's powerful generals, which is alarmed at the prospect of the presidency falling to an Islamic-rooted party for the first time.

The main opposition party said that it would not take part in parliamentary voting for the next president and would appeal to the Constitutional Court if fewer than two-thirds of MPs vote.

by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:30:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There is no Blairism. An 'ism' needs a coherent set of ideas | Comment | Guardian Unlimited Politics
This last decade has seen a new style, a new PR technique, but not a new ideology. Thatcherism remains the guiding light

We are to be overwhelmed. A tidal wave of epitaphs, eulogies and obsequies of Tony Blair is upon us. His era will crave definition. The flesh must be made word, and the word is Blairism. Already it is creeping into the columns of this paper. It hangs on the lips of friend and foe alike.

Let us get one thing straight. Blairism does not exist and never has. It is all froth and miasma. It consists of throwing a packet of words such as change, community, renewal, partnership, social and reform into the air and watching them twinkle to the ground like blossom until the body politic is carpeted with sweet-smelling bloom. An -ism implies a coherent set of ideas, an ideology capable of driving a programme in a particular direction. In plumbing the shallows of Blair's ideas, even his guru, Raymond Plant, was reduced to taking refuge in Daniel Bell's End of Ideology. Like most British prime ministers - whatever they proclaim - Blair in office has taken things as he found them, tootling along until the dying fall of his departure.

Article continues That is not to say that Britain under Blair and Gordon Brown has lacked a guiding light, but that light has been Thatcherism. This reality has been obscured by the congenital bipolarity of British politics and the bifocalism of the Westminster media, in which protocol requires that everything is expressed in terms of government and opposition. Hence Blairism cannot be Thatcherism because Blair is Labour and Margaret Thatcher Tory. For a decade British politics has, quite simply, been wrongly described.

by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:32:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It was about Sarkozy imitating Blair - their philosophy is "whatever works". The optimistic view is that they are pragmatists; the more realistic one is that they are opportunists with no core beliefs who are just following the mood of the day, with no driving line.

Only poodlehood constrains that to some extent.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 02:56:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, that would be too generous. Bliar showed time and again that he is capable to dismiss the mood of the day -- that is the mood of the day of the public, never the mood of the day of the elites he always tried to appease.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:12:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
No, Blair is not Thatcher, because Thatcher actually knew where to stop. Blair is more Major-ite, the constant need of the insecure apprentice to do more insane things to prove he has "courage".

Major's "courage" led him to privatise the railways, something Maggie actually told him not to do. A disaster that unfolds on a daily basis.

Blair's "courage" led him to privatise everything else following Brown-ite neocon priciples of abdicating responsibility for large swathes of policy that, in traditional european terms, were entirely the province of governmental control.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:37:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There is no Blairism. An 'ism' needs a coherent set of ideas

Has this guy not heard of personality cults? Or patronage networks?

In any case, maybe he's right and Blairism won't survive Blair. We'll just get something worse.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 05:23:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Is it a good sign or a bad one that it's possible to say 'Cameronism' without thinking 'WTF?'
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 06:38:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It is? Not for me, I wasn't able to write it in my comment.

"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 06:47:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A worrying Freudian slip, I think.

I meant to write 'impossible.'

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 07:02:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC NEWS | World | Europe | Greens condemn EU's carbon cost
The European Parliament's monthly move from Brussels to Strasbourg generates more than 20,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide a year, Green Party MEPs say.

The Green Party commissioned the study, which says the carbon cost is equal to 4,000 households in London.

The monthly trek is often referred to as the "travelling circus".

The report is published on the same day the parliament is expected to set up a temporary committee to propose new measures tackling climate change.

STRASBOURG PARLIAMENT Used by MEPs once a month Not in use for 307 days per year One chamber, 21 large and 13 small conference rooms with simultaneous translation facility 2,650 offices Cost of second chamber, 203m euros per year CO2 burden estimated at 20,268 tonnes per year "and probably much more"

Nearly 800 MEPs travel by air, road and rail to Strasbourg - along with hundreds of EU officials, journalists, lobbyists and 15 lorry-loads of official documents.

by Fran on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 12:36:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The upgrade of the rail connection should be fast-tracked, and then rail transport be made mandatory.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:14:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe this presentation of the "costs" (CO2 rather than economic) will finally at least hint to some (who usually declaim it all as an Anglo whinge) that there is something here which needs looking at?
by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:46:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
STRASBOURG PARLIAMENT Used by MEPs once a month Not in use for 307 days per year One chamber, 21 large and 13 small conference rooms with simultaneous translation facility 2,650 offices Cost of second chamber, 203m euros per year CO2 burden estimated at 20,268 tonnes per year "and probably much more"
Let's look at the actual calendar of the European Parliament:
12 four-day part-sessions in Strasbourg and six additional two-day part-sessions in Brussels
Okay, so it is true it is used once a month (for a 4-day week each time, for plenary sessions), but the Brussels parliament is used only once every other month (for 2-day "part-sessions").
* two weeks a month for meetings of parliamentary committees and interparliamentary delegations,
* one week a month for political group meetings
These happen almost exclusively in Brussels, that's true.
and four weeks a year where MEPs concentrate exclusively on constituency work.
and these generally don't happen (I would like to see a Spanish MEP meeting their "constituents". That would be a first).

See also the 2007 calendar (PDF).

So: of 365 days in the year, we have:

  • 5 weeks of vacation in July/August and two weeks over New Year: 51 days
  • 3-day weekends for the remaining 45 weeks minus 4 working fridays: 131 days
  • 4 constituency weeks (which are mysteriously assigned working Fridays): 20 days
  • 12 4-day plenary sessions in Strasbourg: 48 days
  • 12 parliamentary group weeks: 48 days
  • The rest for parliamentary committees and part-sessions in Brussels: 67 days

In other words: of the 365 days of the year:
  • 182 days "off"
  • 67 days of parliamentary work in Brussels
  • 48 days of parliamentary work in Strasbourg
  • 48 days of party work (mostly in Brussels)
  • 20 days of constituency work (neither Brussels nor Strasbourg)


"It's the statue, man, The Statue."
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 05:20:10 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The waste is the parliament built in Brussels which should never have been built. The Parliament is in Strasbourg, full stop.

Oh, in other news. The net carbon emissions of green MEPs is equivalent to that of a whole London neighborhood. Scandal! Screaming headlines! Grossly sensasionalistic news.

Meh.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 05:57:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Voters turn their backs on Labour and Tories | Special Reports | Guardian Unlimited Politics
Both Britain's big political parties are under heavy pressure ahead of next week's elections across England, Wales and Scotland, a Guardian/ICM poll published today shows.

One in three voters have turned their backs on Labour and the Conservatives and now back the Lib Dems or a smaller party such as the Greens or the SNP. Support for Labour is down one point on last month, at 30%. The Conservatives have dropped four points to 37%.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 03:17:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If only!... If only this would be the news after the elections.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:16:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yes. Unfortunately though, once you add turnout problems (big party supporters are more likely to turn out) to the First Past the Post system, this is not enough to make much difference.

To truly establish a "third force" in UK politics you need to be polling around 50% of the vote. And when I say "establish" I mean get enough seats to be in a position to win further elections in the near future.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:49:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
For a start, I'd be content with news headlines focusing not on the changes in the Tory/NuLab balance but on falling support for both, even if third and fourth and fifth forces don't gain much influence in terms of elected reps.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 05:12:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I notice there are no figures for rises n support of 3rd parties. People stopping voting out of apathy/disenchantment does not support the article.

I've not seen any move to the lib dems down here, even if the SNP have attracted voters with their impossibilism up in Scotland (c'mon Merry, we need diaries on this)

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 04:40:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nope, the article continues with:

The Liberal Democrats, campaigning hard to defend half their council seats on May 3, rise three points to 21%. Other smaller parties climb to 12%, including 2% each for the Greens and Ukip.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 05:14:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Harsh Words From German Commissioner on Data Protection | Germany | Deutsche Welle | 24.04.2007
The Federal Commissioner for Data Protection has accused the German government of "culpable neglect" in protecting data privacy. He said the government should halt plans for greater access to phone and Internet records.

Fundamental civil liberties in Germany are increasingly under attack from state authorities and private businesses seeking to snoop into peoples' lives, said German Federal Commissioner for Data Protection Peter Schaar during an annual data protection presentation in Berlin on Tuesday.

 

Schaar accused security officials of violating the law in their attempts to fight terror, adding that the Federal Criminal Police Office had passed on information to Germany's domestic intelligence agency -- the Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (BKA) -- that was unnecessary for its fight against terrorism.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt ät gmail dotcom) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 03:20:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I found the Spain employment and GDP figures for housing... in Le Figaro

Apparently it occupies 14% of the workforce, and represents 18% of GDP.

Spanish private debt apparently is 90% of GDP...

Let's hope the bursting bubble doesn't hit too hard.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Wed Apr 25th, 2007 at 08:13:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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