Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
In four decades in amurka, i virtually never drank a beer unless it was the only thing available at the moment, which was rare.  My favorite Frisco literary pub served shit budweiser on tap, to which the regulars added Angocostora bitters so it would taste like something.  Except for the specialty brews just beginning to pop up in the 70's and faster in the 80's, it was all piss.  Plus the make me expand by the minute.

Then i landed in Germany, where for the first months i drank Bordeaux as i did at home.  But as physical labor settled in to distract me from my lack of windpower consulting, discovered that Feierabend (directly party evening, or more linguistically "quitting time") began to feel great with a good Pils.

As the months became years, and i'd begun to sample so many of both German brands and styles, i had to admit my lifelong aversion to swill had been overcome by the deliciousness of dem Deutsche Reinheitsgebot.  In fact, as i post i'm drinking a Schwelmer Bernstein, which is truly amber (hence the name) from a brauerei where they normally make pils.  It comes in one of those bottles with the steel lever to pop off the ceramic top.

With the news of the world bearing disturbing flavors of depression and other symptoms of lack of vision, it's so nice to have a discussion here about one of the true pleasures of northern Europe.  Danke.

(by the way, when it gets hot and sunny... so often here, heh... die deutsche Leute have been known to mix pils and lemonade 50-50, called either Radler or Alster unless Alster is with lemon soda or whatever.  Just goes to show that even the experts can adjust their tastes to the weather, or if they have to drive home.)

Regarding Kolsch, or Colognisch as i call it, i didn't know it was an ale.  it sure looks and tastes like pils, only less so.  But there is a small 150 year old brauerei, Muhlen Kolsch, which makes the most brilliant variety of this local favorite i have ever had.  Head and shoulders above the rest, and well respected.  And the restaurant has the same waiters in the same building as the brauerei's birth!

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin

by Crazy Horse on Tue May 29th, 2007 at 02:40:49 PM EST
Well, even tho' you fetched up in a great place for beer, it's a shame you left the US when you did. Theirs is now a really exciting place to be for brewing and tasting great beers. I could be persuaded quite easily to make a trip to the Great american Beer Festival in Denver this october.  

I feel a short diary coming on.(promises...promises).

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue May 29th, 2007 at 03:19:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Prohibition set American beer back by 6 decades. At least.

you are the media you consume.

by MillMan (millguy at gmail) on Tue May 29th, 2007 at 07:09:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Go to the Wynkoop (St.) Brewery, one of the oldest micros, was really good and Randy, the master brewer was my next door neighbor, so my parties were well supplied.  Current Mayor Hickenloper may still own it.

Our knowledge has surpassed our wisdom. -Charu Saxena.
by metavision on Tue May 29th, 2007 at 07:20:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series