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subcontracting is illegal in cases where the subcontractor would work on site as if he were an employee ("delit de marchandage"), since in the eyes of the employment code the subcontractor is taking the place of an employee. So, yes, it's a solution in certain cases, not in others. Some public companies like the SNCF quite happily breach this part of the employment code.

Just looked that up on Wikipedia.  Wow.

La jurisprudence établit qu'il y a délit de marchandage notamment dans les cas suivants :

  • le personnel sous-traité travaille pour un seul client depuis plusieurs années ;
  • le personnel sous-traité reçoit ses instructions de l'encadrement du client ; le client contrôle lui-même le suivi, définit les tâches et les lieux d'exécution ;
  • le personnel exécute la totalité de sa mission dans les locaux du client, et est soumis à des horaires identiques à ceux du personnel du client ;
  • le client fournit les matériaux, les pièces de rechange, met à disposition son outillage, ses véhicules, des locaux lui appartenant, ses documents, etc.
  • la rémunération du sous-traitant était calculée au temps passé par son personnel.

Get nailed, and you risk 1-2 years imprisonment and/or a $40,000 fine, with or without a ban on using subcontractors for two to ten years.

So if you don't want CDI, hiring subcontractors is not as simple as all that.

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Sun May 6th, 2007 at 09:58:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, what's really forbidden is one company selling the work of its employees to another - and even then, only for long timescale. Nowadays all the IT banking system is organised through SSII's, a kind of company that essentially hires workers and then rent them to other companies. But the mission has to last less than 3 years or trouble comes.

self-employed subcontractors aren't really forbidden...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon May 7th, 2007 at 10:50:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, what's really forbidden is one company selling the work of its employees to another - and even then, only for long timescale.

in the U.S., i have worked as a self-employed independent contractor (software developer), at times under all five of these conditions simultaneously (except perhaps the last, and even then it depends on how you define temps passé):


  •  le personnel sous-traité travaille pour un seul client depuis plusieurs années ;
  • le personnel sous-traité reçoit ses instructions de l'encadrement du client ; le client contrôle lui-même le suivi, définit les tâches et les lieux d'exécution ;
  • le personnel exécute la totalité de sa mission dans les locaux du client, et est soumis à des horaires identiques à ceux du personnel du client ;
  • le client fournit les matériaux, les pièces de rechange, met à disposition son outillage, ses véhicules, des locaux lui appartenant, ses documents, etc.
  • la rémunération du sous-traitant était calculée au temps passé par son personnel.

Are you saying that this in fact is perfectly legal despite what the Wikipedia entry says?

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 04:34:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Yep, unless it lasts for a really long time (above three years). My current mission has lasted for one and a half year, under all those conditions, and not as "self-employed" but with labor sold by my employer to the large bank.

I'm not saying that it is perfectly, 100% legal, but that to that point it's a situation that is accepted by the prud'hommes. (and it's not the only way to provide flexibility for the employer : CDD, interim (temp jobs), and partial employment with lot of overtime (think 10 hours weekly contract, with overtime when needed) are other forms of flexibility.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Tue May 8th, 2007 at 06:00:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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