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Same in London and the English South East.

We have a drought and houses don't even have water meters: people pay a flat rate.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2007 at 04:30:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Most houses built since 1987? or so in the South East do have a water meter in, particularly houses aimed at lower income families.

Strangely enough, articulate rich people have found ways around these planning regulations with some regularity.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2007 at 06:00:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
In other words: metering for the poor, flat rate for the rich?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2007 at 06:17:09 AM EST
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Those lawns aren't cheap to maintain, and if they had to pay the full price they wouldn't be able to afford them.

So expecting them to pay makes no sense, clearly.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Jun 11th, 2007 at 08:08:51 AM EST
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Yes, but in defence of the south East, it's only in the last couple of decades that rainfall patterns have changed to the extent that there are real threats to the aquifers.

That said, government has simply not reacted at all to the reality that they need to discourage development in the south east over this issue. That and the certainty that the Thames Barrier (or any proposed replacement) will be overwhelemed increasingly during this century means that any sensible country would be getting heck out of London, not encouraging even more.

In that context, water meters are like carbon offsets; missing the point entirely.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Jun 11th, 2007 at 10:56:44 AM EST
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