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You found exactly from where I stole the basic idea ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 03:39:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
btw, according to this site we have

2007                        2007
Perihelion  Jan   3 20    Equinoxes  Mar   21 00 07    Sept  23 09 51
Aphelion    July  7 00    Solstices  June  21 18 06    Dec   22 06 08

Which, if untangled, says, I think, that the summer solstice this year is on June 21st--today!  At 18:06...hmmm...I think it means that at midday today the sun is at its highest point in the sky at local noon (plus BST = 1300), and it got up earliest this morning and will go to bed at its latest this evening.  And then winter will be on its way.  But first the summer!



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 04:12:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Strictly correct - however here in Finland we celebrate Midsummer Eve tomorrow, Friday 22nd and Midsummer day on Saturday.

From wikipedia:

Before 1316, the summer solstice was called Ukon juhla, after an old Finnish god Ukko. In Karelia, people had many bonfires side by side, the biggest of which was called Ukko-kokko (the "bonfire of Ukko"). At present, the midsummer holiday is known as Juhannus (or midsommar, for the Swedish-speaking minority), and is the year's most notable occasion for drunkenness and revelry.
Most of the people of Finland burn bonfires (kokko) at lakesides, and eat smoked fish from the same lakes. In the coastal areas that are the stronghold of the Finland-Swedish, these are supplanted by a maypole tradition, transferred from Sweden, and pickled herring.
When Finland was Christianized, the holiday was named after John the Baptist (Johannes) in order to give a Christian meaning to the pagan holiday. The traditions, however, remain quite unchanged and survive in modern-day Finland, although they have lost their original purposes. In folk magic, still well known but no longer seriously practiced, midsummer was a very potent night and the time for many small rituals, mostly for young maidens seeking suitors. Will o wisps were believed to be seen at midsummer night, marking a treasure.
A great many people get very drunk and happy. It is also an occasion when many people look for a relationship (often a rather short one). The statistics for the number of people drowned and killed in accidents are morbidly counted every year while the number of assaults also peaks. It's also common to start summer holidays on Midsummer day.

We are planning a quiet evening in the garden, playing backgammon and Yatzee.

 I doubt if we shall be more than slightly sozzled.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 04:30:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Still a lot of pagans around, you know.

Was in Norfolk a while ago - that's a pretty pagan place still.....

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 04:52:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah!  I love the fact that the road to Norwich--the main road from London--runs through Thetford forest, in the middle of which is...a crossroads...and at the crossroads they have put up...traffic lights.

I think there's a pagan edge around where ThatBritGuy lives, too.  Ditto ceebs.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 05:03:56 AM EST
[ Parent ]
What you didn't say was that it is a trap for unwary foreigners.

All the lights are set to green.......

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 05:36:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I take it you have never been in one of the miles-long queues that form of a morning and of an evening....when the lights turn to red.

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.
by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 05:49:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think there's a pagan edge around where ThatBritGuy lives, too.

Stonehenge is an annual rain and darkness fest, of course.

Avebury has seen a crackdown. (My, how the authoritarians love that word.) You now have to pay a fiver to park in the main car park, which holds a few hundred cars. You cannot park anywhere else or you will be towed away. The police are spoiling for a fight. All conversations to be held in whispers, and definitely no guitars or drums.

And so on.

I had the urge to wander over last night seeing as it's only ten minutes from here. Then I realised the only way I'd be able to get there and back safely would have been to borrow the horse from the paddock next door, and tie it up outside the pub once I got there.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 05:50:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Stonehenge is an annual rain and darkness fest, of course.

When I was reading up on astronomy of the ancient kind, it did occur to me that whereas in some countries (e.g. Egypt) you can probably see sunrise and sunset most days of the year, in England...

"Okay.  It's rising."

"What, you mean behind that large grey cloud?"

When a lot of days are "dull and overcast"...I suppose their calendars were slightly more flexible.

"Well, I think it's today.  I can't actually see it, but I'm pretty sure...ish."

Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 05:57:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
England really was a free country once, remember?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 10:43:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
by wu ming on Sat Jun 23rd, 2007 at 01:37:53 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... at least we can use the myth in a freedom-provocing manner.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Sat Jun 23rd, 2007 at 11:57:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We're all pagans at heart - especially here ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 05:16:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have an urge to watch the sun rise, but that will involve...hmmm...staying up late or getting up early.

London:

Sunrise at 04:43 in direction 49° Northeast

http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/city.html?n=136

Helsinki:

Sunrise at 03:54 in direction 34° Northeast by north

Cairo:

Sunrise at 05:54 in direction 62° East-northeast

Johannesburg:

Sunrise at 06:55 in direction 64° East-northeast

A tilted planet...

Tilty!



Don't fight forces, use them R. Buckminster Fuller.

by rg (leopold dot lepster at google mail dot com) on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 05:01:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Aha, I got to see that sunrise, on the bike ride to work.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Sun Jun 24th, 2007 at 06:00:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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