Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
Strictly correct - however here in Finland we celebrate Midsummer Eve tomorrow, Friday 22nd and Midsummer day on Saturday.

From wikipedia:

Before 1316, the summer solstice was called Ukon juhla, after an old Finnish god Ukko. In Karelia, people had many bonfires side by side, the biggest of which was called Ukko-kokko (the "bonfire of Ukko"). At present, the midsummer holiday is known as Juhannus (or midsommar, for the Swedish-speaking minority), and is the year's most notable occasion for drunkenness and revelry.
Most of the people of Finland burn bonfires (kokko) at lakesides, and eat smoked fish from the same lakes. In the coastal areas that are the stronghold of the Finland-Swedish, these are supplanted by a maypole tradition, transferred from Sweden, and pickled herring.
When Finland was Christianized, the holiday was named after John the Baptist (Johannes) in order to give a Christian meaning to the pagan holiday. The traditions, however, remain quite unchanged and survive in modern-day Finland, although they have lost their original purposes. In folk magic, still well known but no longer seriously practiced, midsummer was a very potent night and the time for many small rituals, mostly for young maidens seeking suitors. Will o wisps were believed to be seen at midsummer night, marking a treasure.
A great many people get very drunk and happy. It is also an occasion when many people look for a relationship (often a rather short one). The statistics for the number of people drowned and killed in accidents are morbidly counted every year while the number of assaults also peaks. It's also common to start summer holidays on Midsummer day.

We are planning a quiet evening in the garden, playing backgammon and Yatzee.

 I doubt if we shall be more than slightly sozzled.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Thu Jun 21st, 2007 at 04:30:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Others have rated this comment as follows:

Display:

Occasional Series