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I was thinking of the children of German Jews.  

Yes, you have a point, and perhaps this is the way to stop war.    Kind of like war reparations but for individuals. Because if no one can profit, I doubt there would be any wars.

By the wa, if any Iraqi wants to sue George Bush, by the way, I'll contribute to paying the legal fees.

by zoe on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 07:15:13 AM EST
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The people who profit won't pay. And besides - after this long, they'll be dead. Is it legal or moral to sue their descendants?

The problem I have with this is that Germany in 2007 is not the same legal or ethical entity as Nazi Germany in 1937.

I have no problem with individuals being sued, and with corporations being sued. It's my fervent hope that if Bush and Cheney ever leave office, they'll be taken to the woodshed legally - as should Halliburton, Bechtel and the rest.

But I think the ice is much thinner when you try to pin the blame on countries. There is a difference between a regime and a country, and if you challenge countries and not regimes, the danger is that you create a precedent for grudge politics, with a potentially indefinite time-frame. Once you do that all kinds of nasty things become possible - legally and otherwise.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 07:58:27 AM EST
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tell that to the Kaczyinski twins in Poland!
by zoe on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 08:01:07 AM EST
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So, all a country needs to do is get a new constitution and they're off the hook?

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 08:11:02 AM EST
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Could someone clear something up for me please?

Were the charges against the Nuremberg defendants included in the League of Nations' Charter or in the Geneva Conventions or were the charges of starting an aggressive war, for example, or crimes against humanity and genocide,  laws made up by the victors after the fact?

Since Germany was not invited to join the League of Nations, I've always had problems with the legal concept behind the issue - I don't mean the humanist values behind the charges, of course.

I am wondering how these same charges could be applied to certain warmongers living today.  If the UN Charter and the League of Nations' Charter differ in these points, perhaps not.

by zoe on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 08:26:35 AM EST
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According to Wikipedia, the relevant treaties are
For war crimes
  • Hague Conventions (1899 and 1907)
  • Kellogg-Briand Pact (1928)
  • Geneva Conventions (1929 and 1949)
  • London Charter (1945) for the Nuremberg Trials
Crimes against peace and crimes against humanity were first defined by the London Charter. The League of Nations Charter dates from 1919, the UN Charter from 1945 and Universal Declaration of Human Rights from 1948. I don't think the Charters say anything about war crimes, that's what the other treaties are for.

The Nuremberg tribunal was ad hoc, just like the tribunals for Rwanda and the Former Yugoslavia, and I believe the reason for the International Criminal Court was to create a standing court with universal jurisdiction to try all these crimes.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 08:40:02 AM EST
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gracias
by zoe on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 08:46:13 AM EST
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So, all a country needs to do is get a new constitution and they're off the hook?

If it's mostly rubble and all of the old leaders are dead, yes.

If it's obviously just pretending and nothing much has changed, then no.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sat Jul 14th, 2007 at 09:47:37 AM EST
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