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I don't think it's quite that simple. Firstly, the middle class journalists will have (literal) vested interests. They're probably the kinds of people who send their kids to public schools and resent paying taxes so that the oiks at the poor end of town can be sent to the local comprehensive. Lowering taxes and improving capital mobility will benefit them personally.

But it's true there will be a strong tribal element in their upbringing. I have a half-finished diary about an inverted Maslow motivational pyramid describing what drives these people.

The key point is that the current incarnation of this AngloSaxon mythology seems to be rooted in dominance for its own sake.

The Wall Street sharks, the neo-cons and the fundies might now look like they have anything in common at all ideologically. But what they all agree on is a metaphysics of power and violence. They worship domination for its own sake, and are forever creating narratives that justify their violent and abusive impulses. There are different shadings between economic and religious fundamentalism, but the basic dynamic - which is the right to be violent and predatory to the weak, excused by some quasi-metaphysical nonsense about God or Manifest Destiny or the Invisible Hand - is common to all of them.

This is not exlusively an AngloSaxon syndrome. It's probably fairer to say that the AngloSaxon tribal grouping has been more successful at it than the rest, and is most obvious at the moment.

That could change. But you can't really solve the problem by tackling either the mythologies or the instantiation of the process directly - the only long-term solution is to name and shame the process itself, in its entirety, in whatever form it appears.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Jul 17th, 2007 at 08:27:59 AM EST

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