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There is a reason I put "of color" in quotes.  It's her language, not mine.

As I said, I feel rather ambivalent about it.

But don't you agree that too often it is society at large that labels people based on their appearance, and not the individual who embraces a certain identity simply based on their contingent appearance?

A friend of mine's father was black and his mother is white.  He said he did not choose to "be black".  But that is how white America chose to view -- and treat -- him.  So he embraced this black identity which in a very big way was forced upon him by society at large.  In other words, if I understood him correctly, it was very hard for him to try to pretend not to be a person "of color".

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 at 07:33:04 AM EST
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But don't you agree that too often it is society at large that labels people based on their appearance, and not the individual who embraces a certain identity simply based on their contingent appearance?
No, I don't agree. In my experience, not every woman of color identifies primarily as a "Womyn of Color". Whether the difference is the extent to which society at large has brought that identification home to them is a question I can't answer.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 at 07:36:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
not every woman of color identifies primarily as a "Womyn of Color".

That's fine for them.  For example, being half-Japanese, I could easily be considered/pass as a person of color.  But I do not identify as a "person of color", not even "primarily".  On the other hand, my sister, I believe, does identify as a "person of color".

The point of my sister's dance teacher was that there are women of color who do identify primarily as such.  And that is their own business, not yours or mine.

And one of her goals, as I quoted is

To create a network of support that validates the artistic practices and creativity of a group of women of color who have traditionally had difficulty in finding that support.

Her view was that white women, at least in Minnesota, cannot relate to the experiences of "women of color", and their experience would hamper in the fostering of that community/network of support for those women who do self-identify as women of color.

Truth unfolds in time through a communal process.

by marco on Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 at 07:54:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The point of my sister's dance teacher was that there are women of color who do identify primarily as such.  And that is their own business, not yours or mine.

I agree. But when they then become political separatists or segregationists, it becomes an issue for the wider community.

On a related note, the other day I watched the beginning of the Channel 4 documentary on the Nazi twins and when the voiceover mentioned White Nationalism I found myself wondering why I found Black Nationalism less offensive.

Can the last politician to go out the revolving door please turn the lights off?

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 at 08:05:14 AM EST
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Well, typically, (as in anti-trust law with near-monopolies) we ascribe different rules to hegemonic majorities compared to the minorities living with them.

I don't know that I'd defend that principle in general, but there is something to it in some cases I suspect.

by Metatone (metatone [a|t] gmail (dot) com) on Mon Jul 23rd, 2007 at 01:27:07 PM EST
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gee, could it be because one is a resistance movement and one is an established and hegemonic supremacy?

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...
by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Tue Jul 24th, 2007 at 08:13:31 PM EST
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