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I also am not interested in it, simply because enough of my time is already take up more locally - though I am interested in non-mainstream US opinion. That does not preclude careful observation of what goes on in the US, because it can affect us all.

I've always found a mainstream American very difficult to discuss with, and thus any attempt to influence those opinions is beyond my talents.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:11:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The US and UK have huge cultural differences glossed-over by the fact we speak dialects of the same Mother Tongue.

Me duck.

(Whatever that means.)

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:25:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well if we have to explain me duck...

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:38:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It is simply an anatidaen greeting of a tolerant type applicable to all, regardless of age, gender, race or relationship. It originates from the East Midlands of England, where divers and dabblers abound.

I advise against it's use except when in the locale or speaking to inhabitants or former inhabitants. It can also cause problems in France where it can be confused with Medoc.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:42:41 PM EST
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I don't confuse it with Médoc, believe me, me duck.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2008 at 02:58:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
East Midlands English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Though spoken less commonly today, the dialect of the East Midlands has been investigated in notable texts such as the affectionately titled Ey Up Mi Duck[3] series of books (and an LP) by Richard Scollins and John Titford. These books were originally intended as a study of Derbyshire Dialect, particuarly the distinctive speech of Ilkeston and the Erewash valley, but later editions acknowledge similarities in vocabulary and grammar which unite the East Midlands dialects and broadened their appeal to the region as a whole.

"Ey Up" is a greeting of uncertain origin used widely throughout the North Midlands and South Yorkshire, and "Mi Duck" is thought to be derived from a respectful Anglo Saxon form of address, "Duka" (Literally "Duke"), and is unrelated to waterfowl. [4] Non-natives of the East Midlands are often surprised to hear men greet each other as 'Mi Duck.' [5]



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:44:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No no that's all wrong ;-)

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:58:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
you en gunna get mi wi thattun.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 06:01:46 PM EST
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Anyroad, I'm off to bed.

You can't be me, I'm taken
by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 06:06:23 PM EST
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Written out that way, it sounds strikingly similar to a strong Southern US drawl.  Odd.
by Zwackus on Wed Jan 2nd, 2008 at 12:10:33 PM EST
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