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Their only strategy in that case, would be to adopt the new messages. They would still lose direct political influence for a while, but they would still have access.

But it is a moot point imo. I can't see newspapers lasting too many years in their present formats. The Finnish paper industry is already closing mills at speed, both at home and abroad, in ackowledgement of those newspapers' forthcoming demise. No panic here yet in the fibre industry since 85% of Finnish fibre goes into packaging, not print papers. But there will be some expensive paper machines sitting idle for a while before they get sold off to other markets.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:31:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What is "their present formats"?

With the multiplication of free newspapers it seems newspapers will not disappear.

If you look at the content of the free newspapers, mostly full of sensationalism or celebrity gossip and of the advertising that makes them viable, and compare it to, say, weekly glossies (where the audience pays to see the ads and the gossip and pseudo-wisdom), maybe what has its days numbered is the "broadsheet" newspaper as a mass product.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:38:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Their present format is to deliver a loyal target audience to advertisers.

Free newspapers do not differ in this.

The market for LWC and super-calendared paper is still holding up (glossies, ad mailings, brochures, catalogues etc.) But even a couple of those have been closed by Finnish companies recently.

Basically many newspapers in the US and Europe are losing a few % sales each year and it is beginning to add up. Add to that the loss of classified ads. Circulation loss is unimportant as far as income, but loss of readers is hugely important in retaining a share of the total ad spend. A formerly wide-circulation Finnish newspaper 'Talous Sanomat' recently abandoned print altogether to focus entirely online - where they had built up a similar audience, or should I say 'community'

And interestingly even the ad spend is shifting (in Finland) with a move away from msm toward seminars, training, sponsorship and trade fairs.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:56:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
and of the advertising that makes them viable,

Are they?

In France they are mostly losing money. It seems their real utility is providing influence to their owner ; the adds cover a part of the losses, but certainly not all of them.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:59:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I find the whole thing throughly enjoyable.

The pluts have been pissing away their money buying newspapers at the exact moment, as you say, they are losing their major influence, importance.

Double butter on my popcorn, please.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Tue Jan 1st, 2008 at 05:40:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Exactly. I just can't imagine why there are people buying stagnant print media at p/e 20 when they can get deep sea oil drillers with immense growth rates at p/e 10.

Buying influence is the only explanation.

Oh, and incompetence. Never underestimate incompetence.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Wed Jan 2nd, 2008 at 01:17:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
p/e ratios are not comparable across industry sectors.

We have met the enemy, and he is us — Pogo
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2008 at 01:29:28 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That was kind of the argument...

By the way, when you look at the PEG it becomes utterly preposterous.

And one more thing, buying companies not to maximize profits, is that not the thing we are supposed to stop those sovereign wealth funds from doing?

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Wed Jan 2nd, 2008 at 01:58:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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