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Sven Triloqvist:
not expecting any historical insight

No, but we shouldn't underplay the fact that this IS popular entertainment and thus brings a degree of education to people who have never been outside the US or taken an interest in foreign policy.  I wouldn't be surprised if Sorkin deliberately produced and timed the film to coincide with the elections and boost the Democratic cause.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Jan 15th, 2008 at 06:21:04 AM EST
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Hollywood has a key role in the narcissistic view that the view US has of itself, and history 'reimaginings' are SOP.

I don't agree that this shouldn't be taken seriously - I think TV and cinema are key tools for building national narratives, and I'd be surprised if viewers don't assume the film is accurate history.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue Jan 15th, 2008 at 07:18:09 AM EST
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Syriana was pretty good.
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Tue Jan 15th, 2008 at 07:25:16 AM EST
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Saw it again (first time in englisch) two nites ago, and was struck by how good it was, AND how unbelievable it was that it got made.  

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Tue Jan 15th, 2008 at 02:44:02 PM EST
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Well that's partly due to Clooney's box-office appeal, which he uses to try to make/be in films he really wants to make - as with Good Night and Good Luck.

For anyone who hasn't seen it - a number of people complain that it is too complicated - just don't try to understand everything as you watch, some things you've just seen become clear some time later in the film.

Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.

by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Tue Jan 15th, 2008 at 05:15:07 PM EST
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Yes, but all cinema builds national narratives. Andy Millman,  Alan Partridge or Mr Bean are as important as the character Zaafir from 'Extraordinary Rendition'.

I am not at all sure that audiences differentiate between fictional or factual-related, ror even comedy and drama. An (old) movie such as Chariots of Fire is just as likely imo to change or reinforce attitudes to the 'national narrative' as anything else.

But I was speaking only for myself in saying I was not going to be looking for relevant insight to the more serious debates. There has been however a drip drip of personal cumulative cynicism from movies such as 'Wag the Dog'.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Tue Jan 15th, 2008 at 07:42:04 AM EST
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