Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
Where are the quotes from?

brave behaviour of the wallachian prince all through those dark years.

Whether one of the warlords of the time was brave or not, I couldn't care less, but Wallachia under its successive leaders certainly had a disproportionate share in the conflict, particularly as involuntary buffer state for the two mighty neighbours. (Actually, it started already when the Southern mighty neighbour was Bulgaria.) The situation was particularly hot -- and presumably quite bad for the population -- after Mircea and into Vlad III "Dracula"'s time, when the two empires would replace each others' liege voivods with bloody coups and punitive campaigns, and send their lieges on proxy wars to today's Bulgaria resp. Transylvania. Just between (checking) 1420 and 1427 alone, there have been eight coups -- every one of them involving Radu II The Bald, Mircea's son kept as hostage and educated in the Ottoman court (and hence Ottoman liege).

The Bulgarian local population was in a particularly bad situation, too, and I wouldn't be surprised if some preferred the Ottomans. For, 30 years prior to the Battle of Nicopolis, Hungary conquered Vidin, and Angevin King Louis I ordered the forced conversion of the Orthodox population.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Tue Oct 21st, 2008 at 05:46:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Others have rated this comment as follows:

Display:

Top Diaries

Occasional Series