Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
ValentinD:
If you monitor fashion industry, you'll likely find a huge majority of woman-employees. Are these companies  supposed to address the causes (I don't know, women more interested in fashion?... more esthetically fit for fashion shows?... no idea).

Well, you can find men in the fashion industry, there are male models, male designers seem even to dominate. Where the men are missing are in the low salary jobs like seamstresses. Unfortunately, it seems still to hold true that female dominated jobs usualy are lesser paying jobs, like chasiers in supermarkets - you find rarely any men. And and even when there are both genders doing the same kind of job there still is no pay equality, men still earn more for the same job. So yes, I think it is up to businesses to offer same salaries for the same jobs, that would create more equality and I assume also what you would call better diversity.

by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Nov 9th, 2008 at 11:13:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And of course raise salaries for 'female' jobs in general. Thus they might get more interesting for men too. This worked here with nurses, once the salaries improved, men were moving into this area too.
by Fran (fran at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 at 12:23:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wasn't speaking of salaries but employment numbers - salaries are quite high for supermodels, and most supermodels are women just like a majority of designers seem to be men.
And speaking of numbers, I honestly doubt that the reason men models are not numerous is low salaries. The same holds for nurses or teachers, btw.
Which makes the whole idea of "creating incentives" useless, for based on false premises. Like I said on another thread, the social-equality methodology is simplistic and even mistaken, not based on serious scientifical studies, and going against individual freedoms and incentive, in the end. (I'm a fierce opposer of anything ultraliberal/neocon btw)

Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last! (Martin Luther King)
by ValentinD (walentijn arobase free spot frança) on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 at 01:49:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Part of the problem there is linked to the expectation that women are going to the be the ones who make compromises to their career to look after the children. Am I right in saying that the countries with the least of those problems are the ones who provide real support for working and rearing children?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 at 03:53:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I wonder how much that is true or a rationalisation. Teachers until 20 years ago were as likely to be men as women, yet there were even more expectation to see the women raise the kids at the time. Feminisation correlates as much with the loss of prestige of a profession as with the ease it allows to raise kids : see nurses, for example. A family's "prestige" still comes from the man's profession, not the woman, so men are more strongly pressed to avoid a career which pays less and less (as is the case for teachers) and is becoming less prestigious.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 at 04:13:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I was more thinking of the reduced wage issue and the issue of women in the lower status jobs in fashion rather than teaching.

The teaching issue is different, I think.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 at 04:25:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
France provides quite a lot of support for working and rearing children... yet still faces these gender inequality issues.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Nov 10th, 2008 at 04:43:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series