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Now my head hurts.  Tips and recs appreciated.  

Has anyone seen "Brat"?  OMG - I'm obsessed with it now.  I think I've watched it every day for the last 3 days.

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Tue May 20th, 2008 at 06:43:59 PM EST
The color scheme, the characters, the music, the thugs running things right out in the open, the economic desperation and McDonalds.  The moral ambiguity, nihilism.  The weird combination of bleakness and euphoria.  Some of the scenes feel like they're taken right our of my own experiences.

Indeed it had a very realistic and direct feel when I watched it a few years back. Unsentimental post-collapse. (Or was there a love-story with a tram driver? I don't remember its details well.) Question: do I remember right that the cast was largely amateur actors?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Wed May 21st, 2008 at 09:29:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
To kick off some discussion: I pair The Rifleman of the Voroshilov Regiment and Brother in my mind. Both portrayal the post-Soviet "moral downfall" in their way. But the first does it in a kind-of 'Hollywood' style: I don't mean the budget, but the one-rightful-man-against-the-world theme, and the happy ending. When I sat down to watch Brother, I expected something in that direction, mixed with that other Hollywood template of the rise and fall of a mobster - but both of those themes were fused into something other.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed May 21st, 2008 at 10:26:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I haven't seen The Rifleman of the Voroshilov Regiment so I can't comment.

But Brother lacks any heavy handed moral of the story message, leaving you to judge things for yourself.  I've read that it angered people with its apparent amorality, because it does not explicitly condemn Danila's actions.  But I don't know.  I think there is a subtle "moral message" about sending a kid off to war (he obviously did not set out the war in HQ as a clerk.)  There's some sense that society, the war, the poverty, etc. has created this seemingly amoral person.

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed May 21st, 2008 at 11:37:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Indeed it had a very realistic and direct feel when I watched it a few years back. Unsentimental post-collapse. (Or was there a love-story with a tram driver? I don't remember its details well.)

There was a "love story" with the tram driver, but it didn't have a happy ending.  She was beaten and raped by gangers and chose to stay with her abusive husband rather than run off with Danila.  But you know, "unsentimental" is not the word I would choose.  There is a certain sentimentality about it, more implied than explicit.  Maybe Danila is even absurdly sentimental, doing these things all for his brother, or the way he saves the director who stumbles accidentally into that hostage situation.  

Question: do I remember right that the cast was largely amateur actors?

I have no idea.  I didn't do much background research on the making f the individual films (unless it was included on the DVD.)  I was more interested in having an overveiw of the current state of things.

"Pretending that you already know the answer when you don't is not actually very helpful." ~Migeru.

by poemless on Wed May 21st, 2008 at 11:25:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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