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Jack Forbes' book popularised the (transliterated) Cree word "wetiko"

Wiktionary entry... "the characteristic of a wetiko is that he consumes other human beings for profit..."


The difference between theory and practise in practise ...

by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Tue May 27th, 2008 at 03:09:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had never heard of it.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue May 27th, 2008 at 03:21:04 PM EST
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Ah, a wendigo!
The Wendigo (also Windigo, Windago, Windiga, Witiko, Wihtikow, and numerous other variants)[1] is a mythical creature appearing in the mythology of the Algonquin people. It is a malevolent cannibalistic spirit into which humans could transform, or which could possess humans. Those who indulged in cannibalism were at particular risk, and the legend appears to have reinforced this practice as taboo.


When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue May 27th, 2008 at 04:05:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
immortalised in Anglophone culture by Thurber, I believe:

... perhaps they saw the Wendigo
or were eaten by bears.
this I know not, I only know
that buses headed for Scranton travel in pairs.

(had to do this from memory since -- for some inexplicable reason -- this much-loved bit of doggerel appears not to exist in the googleverse!)

The difference between theory and practise in practise ...

by DeAnander (de_at_daclarke_dot_org) on Tue May 27th, 2008 at 09:43:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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