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ThatBritGuy:
They also know that if they're ever tried under due legal process, instead of some wacky-land authoritarian S&M declaration of enemy-osity, this inconvenient fact will go into the public record, and they will be so busted that not even Obama is going to be able to say 'No, let's just leave them be.'
So, is this an opportunity for impeachment?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 08:14:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
in the public domain.  

All that is missing (as has been for the last few years) is for Congress to do it.  

The Fates are kind.

by Gaianne on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 11:51:19 PM EST
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<DKos>but that would not be expedient!</DKos>

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jun 14th, 2008 at 11:10:31 AM EST
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Impeachment does have problems, and isn't the only option:

  • Impeachment would focus attention on one or two individuals (distracting attention from the others);
  • It would focus on the legalistic details of few specific, prosecutable crimes;
  • It would distract attention from the reality of broad systemic abuse;
  • It would distract from what could be a massively realigning electoral process;
  • It would distract Congressional and public attention from positive action.

What do you think of the South African option, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission? It could be implemented post-election (unlike impeachment), would avoid the problems I've listed, and could to more to discredit the radical right than any one or hundred prosecutions.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.
by technopolitical on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 02:39:50 PM EST
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Is this Truth and Reconciliation Commission a hobby horse of yours, or have other people been suggesting that the US should have one? In any case, you could write a diary about it.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 04:22:06 PM EST
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A hobby of some sort, I suppose. When I see an idea with merit that isn't being discussed, sometimes I like to give it a push, mostly using the LWLC method (that's Lazy Wikipedia Link Comment). Writing a whole diary would make my perception of my own procrastination too overwhelming, I fear.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.
by technopolitical on Tue Jun 17th, 2008 at 03:35:20 PM EST
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Truth and reconciliation is probably good for whatever low-level apparatchiks who possess sufficiently useful skills to be retained in the absence of political patronage. But I am not sure that it would be a good idea for the highest echelons.

There has been an unfortunate history of American administrations committing crimes against humanity and walking away with barely a slap on the wrist. The truth and reconciliation committees worked in part because there was a very real threat that those involved would have been tried and convicted and lived out the rest of their lives in prison. I don't believe that anyone in the Bush regime believes that this is a realistic option when it comes to their crimes, so prosecuting a few of the end-of-level bad guys would show the rest of the gang that you mean business.

Actually prosecuting some of the bushies and putting them behind bars for a very long time would also demonstrate to the rest of the world that there are limits to the atrocities that US administrations can wreak with impunity. I should not think that I need to stress the effect this would have on the image and soft power of the US.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 05:53:52 PM EST
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Focused criminal prosecution, to be completed post-election, has few problems that I can see. As you point out, there would be great value.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.
by technopolitical on Tue Jun 17th, 2008 at 03:31:45 PM EST
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