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A writer for the WaPo who isn't a republican schill ? The "paper's most reliable critic of the Bush administration" !! You mean there are two ?? Ah, you say a lonely voice, so no.

Which is why I thought he was a republican, I simply could not imagine any other creature being tolerated there.

But it does not stop my wider critique. I imagine the media will finally wake up from their acquiescent torpor sometime in mid-January 2009 and immediately start asking awkward questions of the new administration like it has any right whatsoever to the role of holding the administration to account. And I find it a little sickening to see all those signs of awakening and trying to pretend they've been at it all along. They weren't, they collaborated. With McCarthy it was from fear and yet some still spoke out. But this time it was from commitment and all other voices were stilled.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 09:03:20 AM EST
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I think you might be confusing "Republican" with "conservative" and "Democrat" with "liberal" (American usage). The fact is that both of our parties are conservative, and our "liberal" columnists are, too. The voice of the left in the U.S. is hard to detect in the press...
by asdf on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 09:12:46 AM EST
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The problem is that we have "conservatives" who don't "conserve" and liberals who don't liberate.

In what sense is the (radical right) ruling faction of the Republican party "conservative"? There is a case to be made for genuine conservatives as stabilizers of traditional social orders that have evolved features that no one fully understands. There is little that can be said for radicals who favor overturning law and a liberal social order in favor of greed, war, and authoritarian rule.

Today, Democrats are indeed conservative: The US tradition they are defending includes relatively strong support for rule of law, personal liberty, social welfare, and so on. Democrats are fighting to reverse recent erosion of these traditions. Surely this noble effort is conservative, perhaps even reactionary.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.

by technopolitical on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 02:20:40 PM EST
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The editorial pages have been Bush shills, though actually  the torture issue has tended to be an exception for some reason. The op-ed pages (i.e. the columnists) tilt very heavily pro-Bush or concern trolly high centrism, but there are a couple liberal columnists there - Howard Meyerson, EJ Dionne, and Eugene Robinson. The news pages have produced some of the most important work on exposing the Bush administration abuses.
by MarekNYC on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 10:12:54 AM EST
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I think I posted it last year when it happened, but this was interesting.
by the stormy present (stormypresent aaaaaaat gmail etc) on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 10:29:44 AM EST
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Forgot to mention King among the columnists since so much of his work deals with DC issues (in the literal, not metaphorical sense)
by MarekNYC on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 10:36:22 AM EST
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He's not a Republican.  There are no black Republicans beyond Clarence Thomas.  Most of the WaPo columnists are Beltway brownshirts.  David Broder is the perfect example.

Robinson is not one of them.  He's one of the good guys and a damned good columnist.  The only one worth reading from the WaPo, actually, but I always found Dionne boring.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 01:11:27 PM EST
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Condi Rice? Colin Powell?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 01:39:51 PM EST
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There are no black Republicans beyond Clarence Thomas.

HYPERBOLE ALERT

Anyone who has done business in Los Angeles can tell you that there are lots of Black Conservatives.  A friend of mine is one.  His father is a Republican and I will guess that his grandfather was also. His father was instrumental in the land deal that enabled Pepperdine University to sell its South Central L.A. campus and move to Malibu.  I was a consultant to his son for a year.  We bantered back and forth about politics all of the time.

A company I worked for had four partners.  Two of them wanted to retire.  The other two brought in two new partners, a husband and wife team of Black lawyers, both Republicans.  The woman became the CEO.  Unfortunately she did not understand contracting and ran the business into the ground within five years.  Fortunately, I had an opportunity to begin consulting for LAUSD and doubled my income the year following my departure.  One of her abilities which she touted was "managing account receivables." This bought her a couple of months of cash flow, but then we were on credit hold by all of our vendors.  But these two were exceptionally inept.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Jun 13th, 2008 at 04:38:47 PM EST
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